Posted in Word of the Week

Word of the Week: Chagrin.

Chagrin n.  A keen feeling of mental unease, as of annoyance or embarrassment, caused by failure, disappointment, or a disconcerting event. “He decided to take the day off, much to the chagrin of his boss.”

Did You Know?

Chagrin comes from French, in which it means “grief,” “sorrow,” or essentially the same thing as our “chagrin,” and in which it is also an adjective meaning “sad.” Some etymologists have linked this “chagrin” with another French chagrin, meaning “rough leather or “rough skin.” Supposedly, the rough leather used to rub, polish, or file became a metaphor in French for agitating situations. English-speakers have also adopted the leathery “chagrin” into our language but have altered the spelling to “shagreen.” (m-w.com)

First Known Use

Circa 1681

Advertisements

Author:

Ronovan Hester is an author, with a debut historical adventure novel Amber Wake: Gabriel Falling now on available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle. "5.0 out of 5 stars: Now, I want to warn you… this is not your typical pirate tale! It’s BETTER!" "5.0 out of 5 stars: Totally unpredictable and a real gem of a discovery - Highly Recommended" "5.0 out of 5 stars: An action packed journey to piracy and revenge – all in the name of the crown, queen and county – set in 1705." He shares his life of problems and triumphs through his blog RonovanWrites.WordPress.com. His love of writing, authors and community through his online world has led to a growing Weekly Haiku Challenge, Weekly Fiction Prompt Challenge, and the creation of a site dedicated to book reviews, interviews and author resources known as LitWorldInterviews.com.

5 thoughts on “Word of the Week: Chagrin.

  1. I don’t use this word often. I think it’s because it’s almost too vague by itself. Is the feeling of unease caused by embarrassment OR annoyance OR what? Hmm I’m probably overthinking it!

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Isn’t that funny? As time goes by I find myself looking up more words just to confirm that I’m using them correctly even though I “think” I’m sure I am. 🙂

        Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s