Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #10. Use GROWING UP/Mature as your inspiration this week.

Graduations are beginning around the country. This week think back on either your High School days or perhaps your own children and their experiences. Remember a Sijo is an opportunity to be contemplative.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #9. Use HIGH SCHOOL as your inspiration this week.

Graduations are beginning around the country. This week think back on either your High School days or perhaps your own children and their experiences. Remember a Sijo is an opportunity to be contemplative.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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The Bright Side.

The Bright Side

In times of good
and in times of bad…
the good wish they would
while the bad wish they had.

Going from thought to thought,
and from one extreme to the other,
there are dreams that you sought
and dreams that you smother.

The key to living is not the path you take,
nor the path you traveled,
it’s the things you forsake
while your world is unraveled.

Remember this while you smile away…
when you arise each morning… call it a great day.

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© 2014-2022-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #8. Use REBIRTH OR CHANGE as your inspiration this week.

 

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #7. Use PERFECTION as your inspiration this week.

Perfection’s meaning has changed over time for me. Is it because of what I want, where I am, what I’ve given up on, or all of them?

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

GRACE

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #6. Use GRACE as your inspiration this week.

The word grace has proven to have many different meanings as I’ve grown older. I’m not sure where people’s minds will go in that first moment of reading the word, but with me it’s almost as though all of the important moments come in one flash. Audrey Hepburn is one of those moments.

Thesaurus.com

GRACE

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #5. Use YIELD as your inspiration this week.

Thesaurus.com

YIELD

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #4. Use PASSION as your inspiration this week.

A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #3. Use GUARD as your inspiration this week.

***Prompt NOT inspired by current celebrity events. Prompt challenge and my poem written and scheduled on Sunday.***

A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

© 2022 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #2. Use SEASON as your inspiration this week.

A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

© 2022 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #1. Use (BLUE) as your inspiration this week.

A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or at least used in the poem itself. You can think of BLUE this week as how you feel, your humor, or even nature itself during spring, or the color of the ocean and how it makes you feel.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

© 2022 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Surf – a poem.

Surf
by Ronovan Hester

No peaks, valleys, or destination points.
Never was a road map pointing the way.
No guarantees the fall will eventually end.
The trek back to the top not blazed or marked. Lost. Alone.
Unique in your success, and one more number in the failures.

Dreams ride the random undulating waves.
The crests unstable and never solid for long.
The high only lasts a moment before the crash.
The climax ends in a churning trough of descent, expected, unknown.
To climb this mountain your vision is vast and wide, planning, and watching.

Carried by the past dashed dreams of others,
and the burning saltiness of millennia of failures.
Just one unbalanced breath, and your ride in peril.
And your next, you slip, not along rough terrain to the bottom of dirt and stone.
But down the wall of see-through glass, life on the other side. Predators of players?

Or the dramatic plunge, less graceful than chaos.
Watching the greeting sun reflecting surface below.
Chest raw from the impact through the vanishing hopes.
Pushing through, chin, knees, shins, scrapped with sandpaper of pulverized dead things.
Bloodied and bruised, but not the end, tumbling over and over, gasping for breath. Dying?

Your limp body washes up on the sand, choking.
You join the other eons of unrecognizable rejects.
No one to help. No roadside assistance. No guardian.
People walking along, heads down, looking for empty shells, and finding you.
But you’re not enough, not quite dead enough, you stink of fresh disappointment.

Their heads refuse to look out to the horizon,
never seeing the sun-soaked crests of possibilities.
None of those tumbles, those survivors, or those joys.
They always walk safely on dry sand, toes dry, just out of reach of adventure.
The chance, the opportunity, of living. Heads not in the sand but forever bowed.

Lives only change with empty shells of the living.
Polished with time to the point they all look the same,
yet the wary keep up their search for the next perfect vessel.
Only inches away, a vibrant and exciting life calls with a roar they no longer hear.
But you’ve survived, and you tremble to your battered and pain-filled knees, again.

You stand, turn to that uncharted, desired filled world.
Wading in up to your chest, deep in the sting of the past.
Now dive and swim to fight the tide, or others will drag you.
They’ll help you along or drown you with their own failures, sinking before they’ve crested,
back to those footprints in the sand, now another empty shell to add to their dead collection.

Turn, wade, dive, scan the playing field, and wait for the swell.
Each fall, each ripped open chest and scrapped chin, battle scars.
No success without trying, nor without appreciated amounts of failure.
With each toe that leaves the sand behind, it dips into the salty dreams of ancient warriors.
You learn to descend from those crests in control, with less in chaos. With more success than not.


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© 2021- Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Holiday Train – a poem

The night is dry, and the lights glow with cheer,

As the train rolls through to announce the Holiday is here.

The pretty blue tree, an elf singing with the band,

makes the clouds festive, while in the cold we stand.

Cheeks are happily frozen, slight relief from hot cocoa cups,

a time it’s okay to make kids out of grownups.

Rushing our way home to find comfort in warm beds,

Jobs are tomorrow, tonight joyful dreams play in our heads.


Lynn’s Tuesday Picture Prompt  A Holiday Train.

Lynn's Picture Prompt at twilight with neon, the word Holiday, a blue Christmas tree and an elf.
Photo by Lynn. CP Holiday Train

Penisitivity’s Three Things Challenge   Festive/Pretty/Drypensitivity three things challenge logoFandango’s One Word Challenge.   Comfort.fowc challenge prompt imageMMAStorytime’s 100 Word Flash Fiction Challenge   Job

MMA Storytime’s 100 Word Flash Fiction Challenge Badge Image.


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© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Upside Down – a poem.

Upside Down

 

Been in disguise since I was twenty-five,

never knowing if I should live or die.

Always thinking this world left me alone,

feeling it deeply through blood and bone.

Needing answers with these decades of doubt,

reaching for a handhold before I shout.

Then I met a small Carolina town,

flipping this Southern boy’s world upside down.

So close it hurts can touch but not feel it,

thrown up obstacles I fight to not quit.

This mask is slipping, years I’m passing through,

with no doubts I’ll live now that I found you.

 

ronovan writes poetry black words on transparent background


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© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

my pleas…please. – a poem.

my pleas…please

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Dreams obscene,

thoughts so wrong.

Things your wearing.

turn me on.

What do you think I, feel when I see ya?

I’ve been stupid shy, this I can’t deny.

What is this cold fear, waitin’ for the all-clear?

Praying for a leap year, so I can see…you…dear…

That sinful grin,

jeans so tight.

I love it when,

you walk just right.

 

Skin so smooth

hair feels nice,.

Those fingertips,

I’ll pay the price.

This fire inside of me, is fighting to be free.

It needs hotter degrees., please hear my pleas.

Fire deep inside…

of me.

I’m on my…

knees.

I’m begging…

please.

Please hear my pleas.

Please hear my pleas.

Please hear my pleas.

ronovan writes poetry black words on transparent background


Sometimes I just have to let it go.


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© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

brave your colors – a poem.

brave your colors

Separate roads spread, from shore to shore,

passing through towns, locked door after door.

Where once a neighborhood, or a community park,

now you will find are places filled with dark.

 

All shades, all hues, divide people from another,

but now they separate a sister from a brother.

Where once it was skin, and so it still is,

now it includes what politics is hers or his.

 

Red, blue, green, and more around the world.

In divisive times we must brave our flags unfurled.

 

No matter your age your religion or family,

in this great land, your thoughts are yours and they’re free.

What I fear most is we will fall to our enemy

where once there was democracy, there will be anarchy.

 

If you must battle through the generations,

fight right now for our nation’s foundations.

For tomorrow is not tomorrow, it’s in five, ten, or thirty years,

by standing up now the future will have fewer tears.

ronovan writes poetry black words on transparent background

 


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© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

A Gray Day in November-a poem.

So stark and dreary, this day of judges be,

with scarred scalawags limp in somber defeat.

Are they still useful, or just dried up debris?

Do they wish to win by revolting deceit?

 

The fragrant smell of a hard-fought victory.

Winds wave a once more respected Old Glory.

As the free people of the world cheer and sing,

Wistful crusaders rest and binge The West Wing.

 


 

fowc challenge prompt image

Fandango’s One Word Challenge-Scalawag

 

Tuesday Writing Prompt Challenge Badge, GoDogGoCafe Blog

Tuesday Writing Prompt Challeng-Pick 3 Favorite words beginning with W.

pensitivity three things challenge logoPensitivity101’s Three Things Challenge-Fragrant, Limp, Scarred

Stein Writing's blog logoStine Writing’s Simply 6 Minute Challenge- Use the given quote as inspiration.

 

MMA_Storytime_Rispetto_ Poetr _Prompt_Challenge

MMA Storytime’s Rispetto Poetry Prompt Challenge-Judges

 

Lynn’s Tuesday Picture Prompt

 

Fandango’s Flash Fiction Challenge-Use the given photo for inspiration.

 


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© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Dance Till Dawn – a Poetry Story for the #RWThe13WritingChallenge.

Dance Till Dawn
by Ronovan

Are you old and decrepit

or aged and wise?

Are you young and foolish

or idiot in disguise?

 

No matter your answer,

you’ll be pleased to know,

The devil is in you,

way deep in your soul.

 

He travels your pathways,

sees through your eyes.

He kills your darlings

and thrills your lies.

 

Your betraying glances

are his to play and toy.

Making his days fun,

and his nights to enjoy.

 

In either day or night,

matters not to he.

He’ll help dig your grave,

dance on it with glee.

 

But this tale fear not,

a myth to be sure.

The devil doesn’t dance,

but your writhing and twisting?          It holds an allure.


(The Badge)

Orange Letter with qwill and ink on black background.My writing with 113 Word Count for the,

Ronovan Writes The13 Writing Challenge

Theme: Spooky. Challenge: Write your style/choice with a word count of 13/113/213/313/413 or 513. It can be more, but try to stick with these. Title not included in wordcount. Pingback here or to the challenge prompt by clicking the link in blue, orange, and black (the link just above these plain text sentences.

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© 2020- Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Dance till dawn poetry image. Orange letters on black background. Orange quill and inkwell.

Ranee of Atlantis

Ranee of Atlantis

The vault revealed empty, clarion calls sound,

Ranee slips through shadows, each entrapment found.

 

Fiends unfurl and fly, Deceiver’s crown gone?

What will Ranee do, once set upon?

 

Through streets of Ubar, through dwellings past,

she passes the poor, so many…vast.

 

The demons fly in, stones rain down,

Ranee the rightful queen, wears the crown.



There are a number of words used this time with many meanings. Your interpretation could make the story of the poem be several things, although mostly the same, just with your own imagery and flair to it. Ubar is one of the names of a legendary lost city in the southern Arabian sands, claimed to have been destroyed by a natural disaster or as a punishment by God. The fictional name for it is Atlantis of the Sands.


This poem was created in response to the Weekend Writing Prompt by Sammi Cox of sammiscribbles blog. As you can see it was to use the word ‘Vault’ and be 56 words.

Weekend Writing Prompt 180 Vault badge. Black text on white background.

Sammi’s challenge as well as other blogger’s challenges/prompts links are collected on the page at the top of this blog Challenges/Prompts from the Blogosphere.


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© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

How to Write a Vocabularicon Poem.

This is replacing the previous post due to inappropriate spam I would rather not deal with. Don’t ask.

There are two ways you could do the Vocabularicon.

#1

A few months ago, after I started the Décima Poetry Challenge, I was wanted to create something of my own, as I tend to do. A 10 line poem with 10 syllables per line. It was inspired by a poet named Vocabularical and his participation in the challenge. He was a cool guy, with awesome ideas, and a way with words. I mean, if you’re going to give yourself a name like Vocabularical…you better be good. I decided to name my new poetry form, a Vocabularicon. If you think about it, you definitely will need to use great vocabulary.

#2

What gave rise to a second manner of doing the poem was when I participated in MMA Storyline’s 100 Word Flash Fiction Challenge. I thought this challenge is perfect for trying out my new style for the very first time. So, I wrote 10 lines, 10 words per line, with only 10 syllables per line. Yes, that means only one syllable per word. Your word choice is even more vital here than in other poems. Other than perhaps a Haiku, especially the 3/5/3 version, that’s syllables, not necessarily words or even the non-existent 1/2/1 I’ve tried**.

The quick and dirty instructions: (links are to LiteraryDevices.net)

Number One

  • 10 LINES/verses
  • 10 SYLLABLES PER LINE.
  • DIVIDED INTO 5 Couplets See the example below.
  • With Couplets, meter is important. “Essentially, meter is the basic rhythmic structure of a line within a poem or poetic work. Meter functions as a means of imposing a specific number of syllables and emphasis when it comes to a line of poetry that adds to its musicality.”-LiteraryDevices.net
  • “The literary device “foot” is a measuring unit in poetry, which is made up of stressed and unstressed syllables… The combination of feet creates meter in poetry. Later, these meters are joined for the composition of a complete poem. Therefore, a foot is the formative unit of the meter.”

Number Two

  • 10 LINES/verses
  • 10 ONE-SYLLABLE WORDS PER LINE.
  • DIVIDED INTO 5 Couplets See the example below.
  • With Couplets, meter is important. “Essentially, meter is the basic rhythmic structure of a line within a poem or poetic work. Meter functions as a means of imposing a specific number of syllables and emphasis when it comes to a line of poetry that adds to its musicality.”-LiteraryDevices.net
  • “The literary device “foot” is a measuring unit in poetry, which is made up of stressed and unstressed syllables… The combination of feet creates meter in poetry. Later, these meters are joined for the composition of a complete poem. Therefore, a foot is the formative unit of the meter.”

IF YOU WOULD LIKE, YOU COULD GROUP THE VERSES TOGETHER TO FORM A GEOMETRIC BLOCK. THAT WOULD BE KIND OF NEAT TO ACHIEVE.

  • Think about it, if you can get the exact same number of letters per line, keeping to the other guidelines mentioned, that would be a nice accomplishment.

Below is an example of the 10×10/Vocabularicon.

 

Daddy’s Baby Boy

They sneak at night, to pick their mid, fall  gourd,

But they know not,  they have crossed the Dark Lord.

 

The clouds do glow, to buy the fools some time,

and lead the way, clear of his broods’ wet grime.

 

They come each year, to choose for their blithe signs.

and with plans made, hunt one with thick lush vines

 

Once they find him, his life’s line is cut short,

pray what comes next, you’ve heard tell of a sort

 

The Dark Lord comes, his rage steams up the night,

It’s All Saint’s Eve, and Dad’s set for a fright.


Most of us self-taught poets have used poetic meter and feet for the entirety of our poetic lives. Meter, for this poem, is the shared length of the verses and the rhyme pattern. The feet are either stressed or unstressed words. Stressed is when you go up on the word or syllable. Since this poetry form is restricted to one-syllable words, you stress a word. For this poem  I’ve made the first part of each verse four words long, and the second six. As you read you quickly pick up both the feet and meter patterns with ease. Or so I hope. But, for each person their might the opposite feet emphasis than another person reading it. Also, feet are not as simple as four words here and six words there, you should also listen to how your words are working together to accomplish a natural rhythm and not one that’s hunted for. As I’ve been working with these types of poems, I’ve been trying to do better with meter and feet, but still have a long way to go. But…I keep writing.


**My How To Write A Haiku Poem In English Form post has been updated with some added information.

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© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.