Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #23. Use ADVICE as your inspiration this week.

I’ve been given it and I’ve given it. I’ve taken it and I’ve not. But I’ve still listened each time and do learn. Even bad advice can do good… just by knowing who that advice is from, you might find out it’s good advice by how they’ve turned out.

So I guess I’m saying all advice is good, as long as you’re smart enough to know how to get the good out of it.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 423 FOWL and Weather.

This could be fun, or it might not be. Can’t wait to see what this one brings up.

 

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

FOWL

Weather

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.


 

How to Write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


 

 

Haiku Challenge

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #22. Use ACHIEVEMENT as your inspiration this week.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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The World Rolls

The World Rolls

the tide keeps rolling

steady through ages of time

empires rise and fall

 

This is my entry for this weeks Haiku Poetry Challenge ROLLING and Steady.

There are details in the prompt on how to write a Haiku.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

© 2014-2022-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 422 ROLLING and Steady.

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

ROLLING

Steady

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.


How to Write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


 

Haiku Challenge

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #21. Use GOALS as your inspiration this week.

Goals. We’ve all got them even if we don’t realize it. I have many but that motivation to achieve can be a problem. Even my son has some and he’s definitely got the ambition. He’s been planning a degree in Mechanical Engineering since he was 6th Grade.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 421 SAND and Life.

So what is SAND to you? The beach, desert, sand box, or maybe even the Sand Man and a good long nap?

 

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

SAND

Life

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.


 

 

 

 

 

An updated How to Write Haiku in English. that has just a little more detail and for knowledge and perhaps craft. And how to do a Pingback.

 

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


 

 

 

 

 

 

Haiku Challenge

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #20. Use PRIDE as your inspiration this week.

I’ve been thinking about what pride means and how pride has impacted my life. Has it been good or bad? Is it a good thing or a bad thing? Healthy? Not? Does it all depend? How has PRIDE been part of your life?

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 420 PRIZE and Wait.

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

PRIZE

Wait

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.


 

 

 

 

An updated How to Write Haiku in English. that has just a little more detail and for knowledge and perhaps craft. And how to do a Pingback.

 

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


 

 

 

 

 

Haiku Challenge

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #19. Use DREAMS as your inspiration this week.

We’ve all had them. The dreams for the future and even those we have when we’re asleep. So I may not be referring to the sleep kind here. Have any of your dreams come true? Have they not? Do you still have them? What are you doing to make them come true?

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 419 GRASS and Stain.

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

GRASS

Stain

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.


 

 

 

An updated How to Write Haiku in English. that has just a little more detail and for knowledge and perhaps craft. And how to do a Pingback.

 

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


 

 

 

 

Haiku Challenge

Painted Knees

Painted Knees

too many live their lives

denied knowing the green grass

stains the dreams of youth

 

This is my entry for this weeks Haiku Poetry Challenge GRASS and Stain.

There are details in the prompt on how to write a Haiku.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

© 2014-2022-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #18. Use REGRET as your inspiration this week.

Do you have any? Would you change them if you do?

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 418 KIND and Vivid.

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

KIND

Vivid

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.


 

 

An updated How to Write Haiku in English. that has just a little more detail and for knowledge and perhaps craft. And how to do a Pingback.

 

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


 

 

 

Haiku Challenge

Dance of the Heart

Dance of the Heart

each night the heart breaks

not knowing what new day brings

dance like it’s your last

 

This is my entry for this weeks Haiku Poetry Challenge BREAK and Dance.

There are details in the prompt on how to write a Haiku.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

© 2014-2022-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #17. Use WORK as your inspiration this week.

My son finally started to work at his first job this past week. I’m trying to give him advice about spending…. but he’s a 17 year old boy. He knows everything.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Head Spinning

Head Spinning

breaking out all day

cardboard flat on the sidewalk

dancing on my head

 

This is my entry for this weeks Haiku Poetry Challenge BREAK and Dance.

There are details in the prompt on how to write a Haiku.

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© 2014-2022-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 417 BREAK and Dance.

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

BREAK

Dance

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.


 

An updated How to Write Haiku in English. that has just a little more detail and for knowledge and perhaps craft. And how to do a Pingback.

 

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


 

 

Haiku Challenge

Question for Writers- Software/Programs.

I am wondering if any of you writers out there could tell me what Writing Software/Program you have found useful. It can be FREE or something you must PURCHASE. If you’ve had bad experience with one, please let me know in the comments. I’ll leave it there so I don’t influence your ideas by what I’m needing. Why? Because I may need something totally different than what I think I do.

 

Thanks in advance,

Ronovan

Party Days.

Party Days

Eighteen years ago one month from today, the party started.

Cheeseburgers in Paradise and blew out a flip flop in the air.

Now at work, almost grown up, on the way to independence day.

This is my entry for this weeks Sijo Poetry Challenge with theme/inspiration of PARTY.

There are details in the prompt on how to write a Sijo, a syllable based poetry form similar to a haiku but originating in Korea.

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© 2014-2022-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.