Dance Till Dawn – a Poetry Story for the #RWThe13WritingChallenge.

Dance Till Dawn
by Ronovan

Are you old and decrepit

or aged and wise?

Are you young and foolish

or idiot in disguise?

 

No matter your answer,

you’ll be pleased to know,

The devil is in you,

way deep in your soul.

 

He travels your pathways,

sees through your eyes.

He kills your darlings

and thrills your lies.

 

Your betraying glances,

are his to play and toy.

Making his days fun,

and his nights to enjoy.

 

In either day or night,

matters not to he.

He’ll help dig your grave,

dance on it with glee.

 

But this tale fear not,

a myth to be sure.

The devil doesn’t dance,

but your writhing and twisting?          It holds an allure.


(The Badge)

Orange Letter with qwill and ink on black background.My writing witth 113 Word Count for the,

Ronovan Writes The13 Writing Challenge

Theme: Spooky. Challenge: Write your style/choice with a word count of 13/113/213/313/413 or 513. It can be more, but try to sttick with these. Title not included in wordcount. Pingback here or to the challenge prompt by clicking the link in blue, orange, and black (the link just above these plain text sentences.

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© 2020- Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Dance till dawn poetry image. Orange letters on black background. Orange quill and inkwell.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 29 (FRIGHT) This week, it’s the A rhyme line.

I chose the word FRIGHT this week.

You may, if you wish, make some kind of link between the Haiku Challenge prompt of (BLOOM & Wet). and FRIGHT. Im thinking they could work well together, depending on how macabre you wanted to get. The HIAKU challenge can be switched out with synonyms.

The 2 CHALLENGES are SEPARATE but CAN BE combined if YOU CHOOSE to do so.


Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for FRIGHT, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster.com  Use this site for syllables. I’ve used several online counters and too many have given different counts for the same word, so I use the dictionary now. Also, in some parts of the English speaking world, the syllables may come out in the spoken language a bit differently. And that’s okay. Write to enjoy, too learn, and yes, try to get the syllables right, but above all create and enjoy.

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc with a choice of a break between lines 4 and 5, then being abba accddc, which I use in my example below.


For example, if I say in the subject line of the post:

“…(FALL) This week it’s the B rhyme line.”

my Décima might be…

NO!

As the end wept upon the land,

we could hear the approaching fall.

Justice answered the trumpet’s call,

trusting the fight to her troop’s hand.

 

Fate trembles with haste to expand,

through misdeeds by her shameless foe.

Past foolish decisions now crow,

“Wait—no—this was not meant to be.”

They beg the nation, “Hear our plea.

Heal honor, shout, no…no… NO!”

 

Notice the example prompt word ‘FALL’ is in line 2, the first B line, and its rhyme is in line 3, matching the rhyming pattern of abba accddc.


For today’s challenge, the word FRIGHT must be one of the A line words. Then the other A line(s) word(s) must rhyme with FRIGHT.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 


 

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© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Décima Challenge 28 Poets Collected

13 Poets from last week’s challenge of FATE and their Décimas. All links open in a new window when clicked on.

A strong set of Décimas this week. Some very personal, with guts and backbone and brutal reality. That’s what the Décima can do. It’s a style from Spain and very much a part of Latin culture and the passion in those cultures seem to give permission through this style to go wherever you need to, or wherever it takes you. Sometimes, a poem just wants to be written.

 

 

Decima Challenge Poets Collected Image

Arthur Richardson | Poems, Polemicks and Licks: The Fates


Charmed Chaos: Whatever It Brings


Don’t Forget the Half: Unpredictable Certainty


EASTELMHURST.A.GO.GO: The Expendable Pawn


http://www.engleson.ca

The Change of Seasons-Dark

Winter pokes out from the far hills
And I watch, I wonder, I wait
for the snow caps to shape my fate,
the storms, the winds, the cold deep chills.

Other welcome winter. It instills
a warmth, an air of solemn grace,
of times evoked, the soft sweet face
of life and love forever lost
yet still alive, a permafrost
of pleasure ever to embrace.


Frank Hubeny:  Fate


The Hidden Edge:  Occult Vault  


Like Mercury Colliding: Blooms From Dust 


Mindfills: Magnetic


MMA Storytime:  Left to Fate


Mystical Strings:   Tempting Fate


Stine  Writing: Integrity


willowdot21:   The Awakening


© 2020- Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

morn’s first kiss – a poem

morn’s first kiss

 

caressed by dawn’s light

petals’ tips awash with dew

pearl white blossoms sing

 


My poem for this week’s Haiku Poetry Prompt Challenge.


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© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 329 BLOOM & Wet

Also, check out this much shorter explanation of my Halloween writing challenge. RW’s The13 Writing Challenge. A Spooky Word Count Enforced Challenge for Poetry and Prose. IYou have all the way until the end of Wednesday, October 28th to enter.



Drop by on Wednesday for the Décima Poetry Challenge. Sometimes the two challenges have similar themes you can unite over the week.

Check out the COMMENTS for entries this week, and come back throughout the week to see more links to poems as they come in.

Click HERE for last week’s collected links for easy access to the poems of last week’s poets.

Click HERE. To learn about the new style I’ve created called Shi Rensa Haiku and how to write one, maybe even for the challenges.



An updated How to Write Haiku in English. that has just a little more detail and for knowledge and perhaps craft. And how to do a Pingback.

Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Bloom, Wet
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster Dictionary

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  1.  
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
    • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


The Challenge Words!

GAZE & Touch


 


 

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@RonovanWrites

 © Copyright-All rights reserved by ronovanwrites.wordpress.com 2020

 

Haiku Challenge 328 Poets Collected.

Links to the 35 Poets from last week’s challenge of DRIP & DROP and their haiku. All links open in a new window when clicked on.

 

Haiku Poetry Challenge Links Collected Image

An Enigmatic Life: An Enigmatic Life


Annette Rochelle Aben: Barren Ballerinas


Francis Barker | The Midlode Mercury: Haiku: ‘Abundance’ A First Timer to the challenge. At least I think so. You know me though, I’m lucky to remember to post the challenge in the first place.


Crazy Nerds: Draft


William Thomas Engleson:

The Last Season

I am but a weed,
chilled on the earth, awaiting
Winter’s snow dusting.

 

(And a Shi Rensa)

The Last Season

I am but a weed,
chilled on the earth, awaiting
Winters snow dusting.

Winter’s snow dusting,
Scattered o’er the crying earth,
A silver wasteland.

A silver wasteland,
A dream of frozen sorrows,
And no passage home.

And no passage home,
The deep of it, the journey
Will not see the end.

http://www.engleson.ca


Bob Fairfield: https://bobfairfield.org/2020/10/16/ronovan-writes-haiku-weekly-challenge-327/


Breathing Shallow Poetry:  Dust and Weeds – Z & Z Poetry 


CBialczak | Stime Writing: Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 328 DUST & Weed – Stine Writing


Geetha Balvannanathan’s Blog:  https://geethaprodhom.wordpress.com/2020/10/20/the-dust-had-settled/


Goutam’s Writings: Success – Goutam’s Writings


Help from Heaven: Learning to Respect Each Other


Laura McHarrie @ The Hidden Edge: Whoa  Sometimes an interesting title will get the attention. 🙂


It’s A Humphrey | Humphrey’s Place:

Humphrey’s Place Haiku #1

Humphrey’s Place Haiku #2


J-Dubs Grin and Bear It: Haiku – Dust & Weed ~ 10/19/20 – J-Dubs Grin and Bear It      


Like Mercury Colliding:  blooms from dust


LSS Attitude of Gratitude:   Ronovan Writes Haiku – Dust and Weed – ❀ Welcome To LSS Attitude of Gratitude❀


Mindfills: eerie   


MMA Storytime: Practice, Win, Repeat


Mukhamani (Lakshmi Bhat}:  Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 328 DUST & Weed – Mukhamani              


Dr. Crystal Grimes | Mystical Strings: Harvest


Prairie Chat: Haiku Challenge (10/19/20) – PrairieChat   


Queen Nandini:  My Haikus with the Words Dust and Weed | queennandini  


Lizl Bennefeld | Quilted Poetry:

Raindrop Promises

Dry ground


Arthur Richardson | Poems, Polemicks and Licks: https://arthurrichardson.org/2020/10/21/haiku-challenge-weed-and-dust/


Ronovan Writes: Heavenly Rain?


Scribblans: Sometimes I Don’t Rhymes  


Sketching Words: https://sketchingwords.com/2020/10/19/ronovan-writes-weekly-haiku-poetry-prompt-328/


somawrites:  Faux


teleportingweena: Ronovan Writes Haiku Challenge – Dust/Weed | teleportingweena


The Verse Smith: The Wasteland  First Timer here. Makes sure to visit. Make sure to visit. This is a blogspot blog and their pingbacks don’t seem to work with my blog.


They, You and Me: Ecosystem


Thoughts and Entanglements:  dust .. weed | thoughts and entanglements


Tina Stewart Brakebill:  memories bloom


To Wear a Rainbow: love,live and let live


WillowDot21:   Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 328 DUST & Weed | willowdot21


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© 2020- Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ranee of Atlantis

Ranee of Atlantis

The vault revealed empty, clarion calls sound,

Ranee slips through shadows, each entrapment found.

 

Fiends unfurl and fly, Deceiver’s crown gone?

What will Ranee do, once set upon?

 

Through streets of Ubar, through dwellings past,

she passes the poor, so many…vast.

 

The demons fly in, stones rain down,

Ranee the rightful queen, wears the crown.



There are a number of words used this time with many meanings. Your interpretation could make the story of the poem be several things, although mostly the same, just with your own imagery and flair to it. Ubar is one of the names of a legendary lost city in the southern Arabian sands, claimed to have been destroyed by a natural disaster or as a punishment by God. The fictional name for it is Atlantis of the Sands.


This poem was created in response to the Weekend Writing Prompt by Sammi Cox of sammiscribbles blog. As you can see it was to use the word ‘Vault’ and be 56 words.

Weekend Writing Prompt 180 Vault badge. Black text on white background.

Sammi’s challenge as well as other blogger’s challenges/prompts links are collected on the page at the top of this blog Challenges/Prompts from the Blogosphere.


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© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

How to Write The “10×10” or also called the “Vocabularicon” Poem.

A few months ago, after I started the Décima Poetry Challenge, I was wanted to create something of my own, as I tend to do. A 10 line poem with 10 syllables per line. It was inspired by a poet named Vocabularical and his participation in the challenge. He was a cool guy, with awesome ideas, and a way with words. I mean, if you’re going to give yourself a name like Vocabularical…you better be good. I was originally going to name the poetry form a Vocabularicon, which I think if you want to, you can. and if you think about it, you definitely will need to use great vocabulary to deliver that 10×10 form, see the next paragraph for what I mean.

What changed with the form was the syllables. I still wanted them to be 10 per line. Then I participated in MMA Storyline’s 100 Word Flash Fiction Challenge. I thought this challenge is perfect for trying out my new style for the very first time. So, I wrote 10 lines, 10 words per line, with only 10 syllables per line. Yes, that means only one syllable per word. Your word choice is even more vital here than in other poems. Other than perhaps a Haiku, especially the 3/5/3 version, that’s syllables, not necessarily words or even the non-existent 1/2/1 I’ve tried**.

The quick and dirty instructions: (links are to LiteraryDevices.net)

  • 10 lines/verses
  • 10 one-syllable words per line.
  • Divided into 5 Couplets See the example below.
  • With Couplets, meter is important. “Essentially, meter is the basic rhythmic structure of a line within a poem or poetic work. Meter functions as a means of imposing a specific number of syllables and emphasis when it comes to a line of poetry that adds to its musicality.”-LiteraryDevices.net
  • “The literary device “foot” is a measuring unit in poetry, which is made up of stressed and unstressed syllables… The combination of feet creates meter in poetry. Later, these meters are joined for the composition of a complete poem. Therefore, a foot is the formative unit of the meter.”

Below is an example of the 10×10/Vocabularicon.

 

Daddy’s Baby Boy

They sneak at night, to pick their mid, fall  gourd,

But they know not,  they have crossed the Dark Lord.

 

The clouds do glow, to buy the fools some time,

and lead the way, clear of his broods’ wet grime.

 

They come each year, to choose for their blithe signs.

and with plans made, hunt one with thick lush vines

 

Once they find him, his life’s line is cut short,

pray what comes next, you’ve heard tell of a sort

 

The Dark Lord comes, his rage steams up the night,

It’s All Saint’s Eve, and Dad’s set for a fright.


Most of us self-taught poets have used poetic meter and feet for the entirety of our poetic lives. Meter, for this poem, is the shared length of the verses and the rhyme pattern. The feet are either stressed or unstressed words. Stressed is when you go up on the word or syllable. Since this poetry form is restricted to one-syllable words, you stress a word. For this poem  I’ve made the first part of each verse four words long, and the second six. As you read you quickly pick up both the feet and meter patterns with ease. Or so I hope. But, for each person their might the opposite feet emphasis than another person reading it. Also, feet are not as simple as four words here and six words there, you should also listen to how your words are working together to accomplish a natural rhythm and not one that’s hunted for. As I’ve been working with these types of poems, I’ve been trying to do better with meter and feet, but still have a long way to go. But…I keep writing.


**My How To Write A Haiku Poem In English Form post has been updated with some added information.

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© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

RW’s The13 Writing Challenge. A Spooky Word Count Enforced Challenge (The Shorter Explanation.)

This is a much shorter version of last week’s post, which was around 1500 words. This week’s post is under 600, with 132 of that being the recommended tip post descriptions.

This year I thought I would hold a writing challenge based around a spooky theme, your interpretation of that. I intend to do this annually moving forward. This would be a prime opportunity to share the ‘spooky’ is of your country/culture.


(The Badge)Orange Letter with qwill and ink on black background.

HERE IS THE CHALLENGE

Write a spooky (Your interpretation of what that means.) piece of word fiction (Your choice of style.)

  1. Use one of these word counts: 13, 113, 213, 313, 413, or 513.
  2. I would like it to have a beginning, middle, and end. No matter the style, it is still a work of fiction. Those three elements don’t have to be what we traditionally think of. Yes, Poetry can have those. A hero or main character, conflict, and resolution would be nice. Again, those three elements don’t have to be what we traditionally think of.
  3. At 00:01 Wednesday, October 28th, 2020, EST: My personal piece will go live. You can post that day and pingback to it and/or copy and paste your link. Also, you can copy and paste your link in the comments. (Did you know that you could post tomorrow, include the link in the next section, and on the 28th, it will ping my post?) So you could copy and paste your link/pingback to this post your reading AND set a pingback for the 28th post. I just blew my mind.
  4. MY POST’S SHORT LINK TO PINGBACK: https://wp.me/p4y9jb-HfZ (I’ve already named my post, Dance Till Dawn, without having an idea what it’s about or style for it yet. I figured that’ll be even more of a challenge.) It will go live At 00:01 Wednesday, October 28th, 2020, EST, or New York City time, although I don’t live in New York City. (How to do a Pingback )
  5. Did you know that if you wrote a piece and published it today, with my Oct. 28th link in it as a pingback, that it would activate when my post goes live next week?
  6. So you could pingback both here and there. You could even paste your link in this post’s comments and then come back on the 28th and paste them there.
  7. The Hashtag to Use: #RWThe13WritingChallenge This is if you want to use it. For social media as well as the WordPress Reader. It’s easier when you do it that way for you to find works by those who you don’t follow and for those who don’t follow you.
  8. On Thursday, October 29th, I’ll begin making a post with all the links, as I do with the poetry challenges. I hope to include a one-sentence description for each piece.
  9. Saturday, October 31: The collection post will go live on.

For the original post with some tips, inspirations, and the like, click HERE.


For further inspiration and tips, see:

5 Ways to Discover Story Ideas. This one came out this week. The name says it all, except for the fact it gives some examples of some of the ‘Ways’ provided.

Stripping for Fiction.  This is about how to write Flash Fiction.

Using Proofing to Help Your Fiction Diction & More! With this one, you learn how to use Word to polish your piece. It shows you how to customize your Spell and Grammar Check in Word to do so much more than you realized. It includes checking for Passive Sentences and can even give you the reading grade level of your piece.

5 Unexpected Ways to Inject Humor Into Your Writing  Spooky doesn’t mean scary. Think of the Abbot and Costello meets (Insert Monster Here) movies.


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© 2020- Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Daddy’s Baby Boy – a 10×10/Vocabularicon poem

Daddy’s Baby Boy

 

They sneak at night, to pick their mid, fall  gourd,

But they know not,  they have crossed the Dark Lord.

bikurgurl photo all rights reserved pumpkin farm at night

 

The clouds do glow,

to buy the fools some time,

and lead the way,

clear of his broods’ wet grime.

Image by Bikurgurl

They come each year, to choose for their blithe signs,

and with plans made, hunt one with thick lush vines.

 

Once he is found, his life’s line is cut short,

pray what comes next, you’ve heard tell of a sort.

 

The Dark Lord comes, his rage steams up the night,

It’s All Saint’s Eve, and Dad’s set for a fright.


I used this form of poetry for my last poem, Fuel, for the first time, also written for one of our very own poet community members., MMA Storytime’s challenges. I’ve had the idea for this style for a while, haven’t been able to find it out there anywhere so far. I call it the 10×10, meaning 10 lines with 10 one-syllable words each. You see the structure above if you’d like to try it.

This 10×10/Vocabularicon poem has been composed in response to bikurgurl’s 100 Word Wednesday image prompt below. (Out on Wednesdays, see the challenge list at top of this blog.)She provides the image, and you write what you like, how you like, with, I’ll say, exactly 100 words. She’s a bit more lenient. As you can see, I used my new style for this one. It just works so well, I couldn’t resist.


 

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© 2020- Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

 

Décima Challenge 27 Poets Collected

12 Poets from last week’s challenge of BLISS and their Décimas. All links open in a new window when clicked on.

I’m serious when I say you need to visit and read these this week. I think they’re some of the best we’ve had yet. A few sent me scurrying to a search engine to find the inspiration. And I was glad I did. Great discoveries.

Decima Challenge Poets Collected Image

Arthur Richardson | Poems, Polemicks and Licks: https://arthurrichardson.org/2020/10/15/bliss/


Charmed Chaos | Linda LeeLyberg: Reminiscing Summer


Don’t Forget The Half: Blissful Memories  First timer, Give her a visit and a welcome.


eastelmhurst.a.go.go: The Happy Couple


http://www.engleson.ca

PRIMEVAL POTUSK

He’s in a state, euphoric bliss,
something opaque, and somewhat mad,
deranged, demented, slightly sad,
his urge to share his COVID kiss.

He’s taken us to the abyss,
with megalomanic raving,
“I’m immune,” his new saying,
As if he is a chosen one,
Yet he has simply come undone,
Our souls are what he’s craving.


Frank Hubeny | Poetry, Short Prose and Walking:  Bliss – Poetry, Short Prose and Walking  


Laura McHarrie @ The Hidden Edge:  Bliss – (Decima Challenge #27) – Laura McHarrie @ The Hidden Edge 


Mindfills: The More I Live


MMA Storytime:  Thrills of Victory, Agonies of Defeat


Mystical Strings:   Glissful Love


Revived Writer:  Precious and Priceless


willowdot21:   Bliss is a Quiet Tap!


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© 2020- Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 28 (FATE) This week, it’s the B rhyme line.

I chose the word FATE this week.

You may, if you wish, make some kind of link between the Haiku Challenge prompt of (DUST & Weed). and FATE.

The 2 CHALLENGES are SEPARATE but CAN BE combined if YOU CHOOSE to do so.


Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for FATE, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster.com  Use this site for syllables. I’ve used several online counters and too many have given different counts for the same word, so I use the dictionary now. Also, in some parts of the English speaking world, the syllables may come out in the spoken language a bitt differently. And that’s okay. Write to enjoy, too learn, and yes, try to get the syllables right, but above all create and enjoy.

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc with a choice of a break between line 4 and 5, then being abba accddc, which I use in my example below.


Example, if I say in the subject line of the post:

“…(FALL) This week it’s the B rhyme line.”

my Décima might be…

NO!

As the end wept upon the land,

we could hear the approaching fall.

Justice answered the trumpet’s call,

trusting the fight to her troop’s hand.

 

Fate trembles with haste to expand,

through misdeeds by her shameless foe.

Past foolish decisions now crow,

“Wait—no—this was not meant to be.”

They beg the nation, “Hear our plea.

Heal honor, shout, no…no… NO!”

 

Notice the example prompt word ‘FALL’ is in line 2, the first B line, and its rhyme in is in line 3, matching the rhyming pattern of abba accddc.


For today’s challenge, the word FATE must be one of the B line words. Then the other B line(s) word(s) must rhyme with FATE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image


 

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© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Fuel – a 10×10 Poem.

The mind is a vast starved beast of a thing,

it takes all you give, like leaves in the spring.

 

The means to stir one to move like the wind,

is the means it takes to make the same bend.

 

To feed the soul or to feed the gut’s fire,

start with one thing, to push you to the wire.

 

When the three piers are good, glad, and well fed,

there’s not one thing they can’t do when well led.

 

Keep in tune and you will not fail to win,

lest be your foe man, or be your foe sin.

 

I’ve had the idea for this style for a while, haven’t been able to find it out there anywhere so far. I call it the 10×10, meaning 10 lines with 10 one-syllable words each. You see the structure above if you’d like to try it.

But, I haven’t had the time. So, when I saw today that MMA Storytime, our resident all things macho, (at least in my mind) had his 100 Word Flash Fiction Challenge, (Out on Tuesday, see the challenge list at top of this blog.) I thought…oh why not give it a shot. This week’s word is DIET. You don’t have to use the word, just be inspired by it.

MMA Storytime’s 100 Word Flash Fiction Challenge Badge Image.


 

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5 Ways to Discover Story Ideas.

Many people want to be a writer. They want to create the perfect story about___________? And that blank is about as far as the majority gets with their dream. The dream will stay with them for years or even decades of their lives. They might have a vague image of something in their mind, but it refuses to become a clearly formed image.

I’ve been like that with some of my ideas. I’ll sit for hours on adjectives swirling around in my brain but not sure what they’re mean. But, eventually, I growl into the 02:00 AM air and break out a pen and pad of paper or go full-on rage mode and boot up the laptop. That’s when the business of story ideas begins.

5 WAYS TO DISCOVER STORY IDAS IMAGE, BACK TEXT ON WHITE BACKGROUND


 

“Everybody walks past a thousand story ideas every day. The good writers are the ones who see five or six of them. Most people don’t see any.”Orson Scott, Author of the Ender’s Game series.

Orson Scott quote, white letters, on silhouette of legs walking on coblble stone street.

Scott is right, very right. You hear many people say, “A story torn from today’s headlines.” The reason for that is because the book or short story, headline the author/writer saw on the news, in the newspaper, or even a social media snippet.

TORN FROM THE HEADLINES

These headlines aren’t just for reality-based genres but can be used for science fiction and fantasy, and magical realism. Yes, that last one is somewhat reality-based, but it still can have plenty of fantasy elements.

I took a glance at today’s headlines, and one is about the L.A. Dodgers going for their 7th World Series title while the Tampa Bay Rays are going for their first.
The first idea to come to mind is a fantasy in which to win their freedom, the Rays of Taba must defeat the brutal forces of the Angels of DoLos.  The Rays know this is their last chance. The battle is set in a series of ever-increasing deadly matches of skill, requiring the combatants to overcome the fear of the situation places them in. The protagonist/hero/main character can be any gender or none at all, any skin tone, any traits at all that appeals to you. The Rays don’t need to win in the story but can lose by deceit, and then they begin to truly fight. They do so guerilla-style, hit and run, a war from the shadows.

Here’s another fantasy idea using the same headline and the same names, with a twist. Prince Taba must find the Ring of Wisdom before Lord Ángeles of the Kingdom of DoLos or Ángeles will possess all Seven Rings of The Ancients and have the power to destroy Taba’s people. If Taba can find it first, the wisdom he receives will save his people and overcome the DoLos. The 7th Ring! In the Bible, the number 7 is the number of physical and spiritual perfection. In numerology, it means both deep and wise. Both references have even more meanings, but I think you get where this is going. Here, I turned Taba into a person. You could also turn this into an Indiana Jones-type action-adventure as well, think Temple of Doom. Or you could say Taba must reach the 7th Circle, the Circle of (Fill in the Blank), to defeat Lord Ángeles of the Kingdom of DoLos.

“But there’s a story behind everything. How a picture got on a wall. How a scar got on your face. Sometimes the stories are simple, and sometimes they are hard and heartbreaking. But behind all your stories is always your mother’s story, because hers is where yours begin.”Mitch Albom, author of Tuesdays with Morrie.

Mitch Albom quote on silhouettes of mothers with children scenarios.

This one nails the idea behind finding a story. What Albom says is true. You can take a moment in your life and turn it into something else.

PERSONAL LIFE MOMENTS

For instance, I had a few seconds when I was in the 6th grade that could’ve changed my entire school experience. I can still feel that moment today. I’ve relived that moment but changed it in so many ways. Each change leads me down a new path in life. I usually end up being a common sense, logical genius, solving the environmental, global warming, green energy, unemployment, poverty, and hunger problems of the world. And the solution is easy. After all, I’ve done it several times.

I’ve rescued famous people. Won elections. Prevented disasters. Conquered Mars. Colonized planets in other solar systems. And I’ve done it all by changing one point or other in my life.

INSPIRED BY OTHER WORKS

Another way to find an idea is to read a book, watch a movie or TV show, or listen to a song. I’ve found ideas in each of those. No, I don’t copy what I’m enjoying. What I do is, take a line, or an image or some random interpretation of a moment or an emotion, and turn that into a story idea. I currently have 74 separate series of ideas. That’s not 74 books, that’s 74 series. And some of those series I already have three to twelve books story structured.

I write down everything I come up with, along with a description of the idea, what inspired it and anything else I can come up with. If it’s a song, what line of the song and what was I thinking or feeling that inspired the idea. Just a title doesn’t always work. Get all the details you can, or at least enough to head you in the right direction when and if you ever come back to it. If you are serious about becoming an author, carry something on you that you can get those ideas in a form for later. A little notebook, your phone to either make a note or record a message, a tablet.

If you don’t you may lose the most enjoyable writing experience of your life. Some people say, if you can’t remember the idea until later, then it wasn’t good enough, to begin with. Not true. At least not always. I’ve seen so many of my ideas show up on both the big screen and small screen. Some I’ve written down, and some that come back to me as I’m watching or sometimes even reading my thought I had twenty years ago.

“Don’t stop because you’ve hit a block. Finish the page, even if you write nothing but your own name. The block will break if you don’t give in to it. Remember, writing is a physical habit as well as whatever you want to think it is—calling, avocation, talent, genius, art.”Isabelle Holland, author of The Man Without a Face.

Isabelle Holland quote in simple white text on black band and marble styled background.

GET IT OUT OF YOUR HEAD AND INTO WORDS

But what if you’re still wanting to grab onto that vague image you have?

  1. Write down those adjectives you have, no matter how random or unrelated you think they may be.
  2. Get in front of the laptop, close your eyes, and begin typing what you can make out of that image. It may not make any sense. That’s perfectly fine. First moments of ideas seldom do.
  3. Don’t backspace. You can spellcheck later. That’s what Grammarly or whatever you like to use, is for.
  4. As you type, there is a good chance other random thoughts will come to mind, possibly trying to distract you, or so you think. Type them. Get them out of your head so you can either use them later or get them out of the way of where you’re headed.

Once you’ve done what you can. You can do one of two things:

  1. Read what you’ve come up with and see if it takes you somewhere
  2. Walk away for a few days and give your brain and the information time to rest/marinate.
    • You have a creative whirlwind and ideas fly from through your fingers and into words you’ve been begging for.
    • You get frustrated because none of it makes sense and you are no closer to your goal than before you started….or so you think at the time.\

Two things could happen with either choice, in other words, pros and cons:

  1. READING IT NOW:
    • You have a creative whirlwind and ideas fly from through your fingers and into words you’ve been begging for.
    • Or you get frustrated because none of it makes sense and you are no closer to your goal than before you started….or so you think at the time.\
  2. WAITING A FEW DAYS;
    • You return with a fresh uncluttered mind. Perhaps random ideas have popped into your head while doing other tasks
    • Or you see what the words and thoughts, and get frustrated. And for the same reason as the READING IT NOW frustration. You just don’t see it yet.

TAKING WHAT YOU HAVE AND RUNNING WITH IT

But what you can do once you have the results of those initial word writing storms is expand on the words, the adjectives. You know you want a certain kind of story, you just don’t know what the story is. Now you begin to add.

  • Is there a positive protagonist? If so, what are the characteristics you would like the character to have? These can be both external and internal characteristics.
  • Do you want the character to have flaws? If so, what kind do you feel drawn to at that moment?
  • Do you want them to be an anti-hero?
  • Do you have thoughts of an antagonist? Now, this is a bit tricky. An antagonist can take on the guise of a person, a creature, a spirit, a political system, a society, a nation, a world, a universe, and so many other things. Write down the ones you like.
  • Do you see colors? Sounds odd, but colors can lead you places. It could be hair, eyes, the sky, sea, land, or an object.
  • Do you get a feeling there are certain types of people, like an alien race, or elves or sidekicks, anything?

Just because you write it down the initial ideas or the expanded ones, does not mean you must use them. It’s just word playing and seeing if something jumps or sticks.

“This is how you do it: you sit down at the keyboard and you put one word after another until it’s done. It’s that easy, and that hard.” — Neil Gaiman, author of many things.

Neil Gaiman quote in white text on background of people typing and a retro comic strip character.

AND THE BONUS: WRITING PROMPTS

This is such an obvious one, I almost didn’t include it. You can throw a rock at a list of blogs and probably hit one that has writing prompts. And I don’t just mean for you to use flash fiction or prose writing prompts. Poetry prompts or photography prompts will work just as well.  Here’s a post on Reedsy.com’s blog, Best Fantasy Writing Prompts, which has 107 for you to choose from. But don’t forget there’s a list of blogs and prompts they offer here on this site, Challenges/Prompts From the Blogosphere.

Of course. there are other ways to come up with ideas, but these are a few you can start with.


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Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 328 DUST & Weed

Hello to all, I have a request to make: Click here for my post from Friday ‘Poetry Challenges and Prompts‘. I’m not taking any other space here for it than that.

Also, check out RW’s The13 Writing Challenge. A Spooky Word Count Enforced Challenge for Poetry and Prose. IYou have all the way until the end of Wednesday, October 28th to enter. It looks like a long post but isn’t. Some of it is just an explanation of what certain elements are such as a protagonist, conflict, climax, and resolution. I go into quite a bit of detail with examples from the Netflix show House of Cards and Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. Not as their being examples of spooky stories, but to give examples of what most people would be familiar with. I even explain how a villain can be the protagonist.



Drop by on Wednesday for the Décima Poetry Challenge. Sometimes the two challenges have similar themes you can unite over the week.

Check out the COMMENTS for entries this week, and come back throughout the week to see more links to poems as they come in.

Click HERE for last week’s collected links for easy access to the poems of last week’s poets.

Click HERE. To learn about the new style I’ve created called Shi Rensa Haiku and how to write one, maybe even for the challenges.



An updated How to Write Haiku in English. that has just a little more detail and for knowledge and perhaps craft. And how to do a Pingback.

Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Dust, Weed
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster Dictionary

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  1.  
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
    • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


The Challenge Words!

DUST & WEED

Not sure how to write a Haiku? Click HERE for a quick How to write Haiku Poem in English Form with links to posts for other forms of Haiku.

Much Respect-Much Love

Ronovan


 


 

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Haiku Challenge 327 Poets Collected.

Links to the 21 Poets with around 27 Poems, including 2 Tanka and 2 First Visiting Poets from last week’s challenge of DRIP & DROP and their haiku. All links open in a new window when clicked on.

For some who visit, you may wonder why some links below have titles and some have the full post address. Haiku traditionally do not have titles. But, if a poet does use one, which is their prerogative, then I shorten the link to just the title for a more visually appealing, less busy, and easier to read post.

 

Haiku Poetry Challenge Links Collected Image

Art Mater: Drip & Drop: Haiku #11 – Art Mater      First Time to the Challenge that I can recall. Make sure to visit!


William Thomas Engleson:

Where Did it Go

Time tick tocks, time talks
as seasons drip drop, slip slop
Into the vacuum.

http://www.engleson.ca


Bob Fairfield: https://bobfairfield.org/2020/10/16/ronovan-writes-haiku-weekly-challenge-327/


Geetha Balvannanathan’s Blog:  Trace of Red Teardrops    6 Haiku that are linked with one theme. A Must Read. Read it slowly and feel the words and imagery.


Guarded Heart Tapestry | Jael Stevens: God’s Mercy


Help from Heaven:   Patient Endurance


Laura McHarrie @ The Hidden Edge:   Cliff’s Edge


It’s A Humphrey | Humphrey’s Place: (I had to look up what a Humphrey is and it’s kind of like me, a carbon-based lifeform but with a different location.) FIRST TIMER MAKE SURE TO VISIT!

Ronovan Writes Haiku; Drip and Drop – Humphrey’s Place


J-Dubs Grin and Bear It:  Haiku – 10/12/20 – J-Dubs Grin and Bear It     


Lauren | LSS Attitude of Gratitude:    https://lssattitudeofgratitude.wordpress.com/2020/10/15/ronovan-writes-haiku-drip-drop/


Mindfills:  Lulling          


Mukhamani (Lakshmi Bhat}:    Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 327 DRIP & DROP – Mukhamani            


Dr. Crystal Grimes | Mystical Strings:   Natural Music


Prairie Chat:   Haiku Challenge (10/12/20) – PrairieChat 


Queen Nandini:     My Haikus with the Words Drip and Drop | queennandini


Quilted Poetry:    Midnight and Dawn    A Tanka.  HAHAHA, she said kerPLOP. 🙂


Arthur Richardson | Poems, Polemicks and Licks: https://arthurrichardson.org/2020/10/13/haiku-challenge-drip-and-drop/


Ronovan Writes:

fall

sate


Scribblans: Sometimes I Don’t Rhymes


somawrites: Bare | somawrites


Straight From My Heart:   Morning Dewdrops


WillowDot21: Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 27 (BLISS) This week, it’s the A rhyme line. | willowdot21  Anyone else notice the new profile photo? Hmm?    A Tanka.


© 2020- Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Heavenly Rain? – a haiku poem

race through time and space

down to Earth as ghostly dust

to lie in the weeds

*

ronovans haiku image

 


My poem for my Haiku Poetry Prompt Challenge. https://ronovanwrites.com/2020/10/19/ronovan-writes-weekly-haiku-poetry-prompt-challenge-328-dust-weed/.

&

For Eugi’s Weekly Prompt on Monday’s – Ghostly

Eugi's weekly promptt on Monday image. Silhouette of two women at a table with multi colored background.

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 © 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

RW’s The13 Writing Challenge. A Spooky Word Count Enforced Challenge for Poetry and Prose. UPDATED 10/19/2020.

This year I thought I would hold a writing challenge based around a spooky theme, your interpretation of that (some ideas down below to help you start thinking). I intend to do this annually moving forward. This would be a prime opportunity to share the spooky of your country/culture.

RW The 13 Writing Challenge featured image. Orange text on black background.(Not the Badge. 4 Badge choices throughout the post.)


There are some ideas you might use for your Poetry or Prose below, in case you need something to help get the creativity going. The posts will be due no later than Wednesday, October 28th. Here’s the short link https://wp.me/p4y9jb-HfZ to my post that day for everyone to pingback to or paste into once it’s live.  You can put the link in your post as a pingback whenever you complete your Poetry or Prose, and when my Poetry or Prose goes live, and yours does, it works. I actually made up the title of my piece and have no idea what it’s about or what style I’m using.

UPDATE: If you really don’t want to either schedule your piece for the 28th and maybe you just want it live now, you can put the link in the comments here and use he post link in the address bar to pingback.

The hashtag to tag your post with is: #RWThe13WritingChallenge


Orange Letter with qwill and ink on black background.

 

HERE IS THE CHALLENGE

Note: The section on YOUR ENTRY MUST INCLUDE looks long but if you know what the 4 mentioned requirements are, you don’t really need to read the rest of that part. Requirements 3&4 of your P/P might be the one and the same.

  • THEME: It’s a spooky tale to be told. The interpretation of what that means is up to you. Horror, humor, mystery, or any other genre. Romance? Or combine them all.

  • STYLE: Poetry, Prose, Free Verse (As long as it’s tight and not loose like mine usual,ly is when I’m being random.) For those of you who would like to do a Haiku or Tanka, this would work with the word count of 13, which you see just below. Also, a Haibun would work nicely. If you had a non-fiction story to share and then end with a Haibun it might be an amazing combination and show your ability to stay with your poetry style.

  • WORD COUNT: Exactly one of the following, 13, 113, 213, 313, 413, or 513. If you need to go higher than that, just make note of it in the comments of my entry post of what ’13’ you did go up to. The challenge is to stay 513 or less, but I don’t want a great story idea to be weakened if you can’t get the word count down to 513. I would rather read your best than your lesser. The title is not included in the word count, only the body/content of the piece.

  • YOUR ENTRY MUST INCLUDE: You may find that 3&4 are closely aligned. Your Climax may be the Resolution of your idea.
  1. protagonistThe protagonist is at the center of the story, makes the key decisions and experiences the consequences of those decisions. The protagonist is the primary agent propelling the story forward and is often the character who faces the most significant obstacles.” – Wikipedia
    • I used the Wikipedia definition of the protagonist because it basically gave the best one. With this definition, you can see that even a villain can be the protagonist in a story. A perfect example of this protagonist type would be (SPOILER WARNING. If you click these two links, and haven’t seen House of Cards, you’ll learn  more than you might want to.) Frank Underwood from the Netflix series House of Cards. He has a political goal and stops at nothing to try and make it happen. You learn this in the first episode or two. If you’re a writer of fiction of length from a short story and upward I suggest you watch the series. You get some great ideas for a subtle, cagey, and crafty villain. He has the goal of the show, and anyone that tries to stop that goal is an antagonist.
  2. conflict   “In literature, conflict is a literary element that involves a struggle between two opposing forces, usually a protagonist and an antagonist.” – LiteraryTerms.net   There is also INTERNAL conflict.  The link takes you to a list of what internal conflicts can be. It’ll give you an idea of what it’s about, in case you’ve never really thought about it. Good examples of internal conflict would be when a reporter knows something that could be disastrous for a person’s career or crossing what is seen as a moral or ethical line to get a story and get it to press or on air.
  3. climax  “Climax is the highest point of tension or drama in a narratives’ plot. Often, [the] climax is also when the main problem of the story is faced and solved by the main character or protagonist.” –  LiteraryTerms.net
    • Using Romeo and Juliet as an example, the climax comes in Act III, when Romeo is banished after killing Tybalt. But some contend there is a second climax when Juliet refuses to wed Paris by taking the drug to appear dead. This idea is considered because there are two protagonists to the story. Some say the suicides of Romeo and Juliet is either the climax or a second or third climax. But one can argue that the suicides result directly from Tybalt’s death by Romeo’s sword, and Juliet’s refusing to marry Paris by pretending to be dead. They are then left in a unique situation that ends with their suicides. And strangely enough, they were married the day after they met and it is implied they consummated the marriage that night since he spent the night in her bed.
  4. resolution “The resolution, also known as the denouement, is the conclusion of the story’s plot. It’s where any unanswered questions are answered, or “loose ends are tied.” – LiteraryTerms.net
    • Continuing with Romeo and Juliet the resolution is that now with Romeo and Juliet dead, their families end their feud as they realize that their hatred has led to the deaths of their children.

 

Orange Letters with Qwill and ink, transparent background.


  • IDEAS TO GET YOUR THOUGHTS MOVING: If you need help thinking of one.
  1. You open the door on Halloween and you find (?) wanting to receive a specific treat from you or they are going to trick you, and you have to figure out how to either escape or give them their requested treat.
  2. You’re driving along a foggy road and approach a one-lane bridge and (?).
  3. A circus comes to town and does a Halloween night special performance, and the center ring attraction is (?).
  4. You’re reading your favorite Fantasy/SciFi book when the main villain escapes from the pages and you must catch them before (?).
  5. Or using #4, the hero comes to life and you must help them stop (?) before they (?).

  • PUBLISH POST DATE:

No later than Wednesday, October 28th. Why? Because I will put out MY personal entry on the 28th at 00:01 EST, That’s one minute after midnight New York City time. And at that point, pingbacks can ping, and you can paste your links in the comments. The no later part reason is given below.

UPDATE: If you really don’t want to either schedule your piece for the 28th and maybe you just want it live now, you can put the link in the comments here and use he post link in the address bar to pingback.

Black letters with qwill and ink, transparent background.

 


  • HASHTAG TO TAG YOUR POST WITH:

#RWThe13WritingChallenge for tagging your post and on Social Media.


  • MY POST’S SHORT LINK TO PINGBACK TO:

https://wp.me/p4y9jb-HfZ (I’ve already named my post, Dance Till Dawn, without having an idea what it’s about or style for it yet. I figured that’ll be even more of a challenge.)


  • SATURDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2020

On Thursday, October 29th, I’ll begin making a post with all the links, as I do with the poetry challenges. I’ll hope to include a one-sentence description. The collection post will go live on Saturday, October 31. With this collection, perhaps you can have some great stories or poetry to share with your friends of the family. Think like that when you write. This is a time to show your writing chops and entertain.

Good luck. Good writing. And most of all Good Fun to everyone.

There are 4 BADGES FOR THE CHALLENGE in this post for you to choose from if you would like to use one (not required). They are 300X300. Of course, reduce the size to tiny if that works for you. Two have color backgrounds and the others are just text with transparent backgrounds.

Black letters with qwill and ink on orange background.

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

fall – a haiku poem

weeping hues

from canopy falls

food for life

*

ronovans haiku image

 


My poem for my Haiku Poetry Prompt Challenge. https://ronovanwrites.com/2020/10/12/ronovan-writes-weekly-haiku-poetry-prompt-challenge-327-drip-drop/.

 

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 © 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 27 (BLISS) This week, it’s the A rhyme line.

I chose the word BLISS this week.

You may, if you wish, make some kind of link between the Haiku Challenge prompt of (DRIP & DROP). and BLISS.

The 2 CHALLENGES are SEPARATE but CAN BE combined if YOU CHOOSE to do so.


Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for BLISS, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster.com  Use this site for syllables. I’ve used several online counters and too many have given different counts for the same word, so I use the dictionary now. Also, in some parts of the English speaking world, the syllables may come out in the spoken language a bitt differently. And that’s okay. Write to enjoy, too learn, and yes, try to get the syllables right, but above all create and enjoy.

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc with a choice of a break between line 4 and 5, then being abba accddc, which I use in my example below.


Example, if I say in the subject line of the post:

“…(FALL) This week it’s the B rhyme line.”

my Décima might be…

NO!

As the end wept upon the land,

we could hear the approaching fall.

Justice answered the trumpet’s call,

trusting the fight to her troop’s hand.

 

Fate trembles with haste to expand,

through misdeeds by her shameless foe.

Past foolish decisions now crow,

“Wait—no—this was not meant to be.”

They beg the nation, “Hear our plea.

Heal honor, shout, no…no… NO!”

 

Notice the example prompt word ‘FALL’ is in line 2, the first B line, and its rhyme in is in line 3, matching the rhyming pattern of abba accddc.


For today’s challenge, the word BLISS must be one of the A line words. Then the other A line(s) word(s) must rhyme with BLISS.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.