Décima Challenge 26 Poets Collected

10 Poets from last week’s challenge of SWING and their Décimas. All links open in a new window when clicked on.

Nice variety this week. A bit of humor, some family stories, nature, nurture, a bit of this, a bit of that, and etc. In other words, we got some good sttuff this week. (Don’t judge the poets by my lack of couth and grammatcal dexteritty and adeptitude.)

Yeah, I had to look up how to spell couth, what of it? I’m not ashamed to admit it.

Decima Challenge Poets Collected Image

Arthur Richardson | Poems, Polemicks and Licks: Captain Swing


EASTELMHURST.A.GO.GO.: The East Elmhurst A Go Go


http://www.engleson.ca

In the Swing of Things

I wait in my corner: a spring
in my step, smile on my lips,
ignoring that pain in my hips,
loaded for bear, but here’s the thing…

Much has changed, a pendulum swing,
a wearing down, more fits than starts,
my fair share of replacement parts;
Not quite bionic, robot bound,
and there are days I don’t hear a sound,
bred by Science, and not the Arts.


Frank Hubeny:  Swing – Poetry, Short Prose and Walking  


The Hidden Edge:  Swing (Weekly Decima Prompt #26) – Laura McHarrie @ The Hidden Edge


Mindfills:  time-blanket-a-quadrille


MMA Storytime:  Winning Fights


Mystical Strings: A Failing Art


Ronovan Writes: Long Gone


willowdot21:  Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 26 (SWING) This week, it’s the A rhyme line. | willowdot21


© 2020- Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Thanks, Dad! – Flash Fiction

“Hey, did you see that show last night?”

“Which one?”

“Well, it was the only one worth watchin’. So classy. So luxurious. So loaded wi—”

“Dad!”

“Yeah!”

“Do you know where the peanut butter is?”

Bill’s eyes narrowed in deep thought. “Yeah, I think it’s in the garage on the John Deere.”

“Again?”

“Hey, don’t judge me.”

“Thanks, Dad!”

“That’s more like it.”

“So what was this show? I thought you only watched ESPN and Fox?”

“Yeah. But, they don’t show stuff like this one. Let me tell you, you get to go inside thei—”

“Dad!”

“Yeah!”

“Do you know where the jelly is?”

“Which one?”

“The strawberry, duh. Is there any other kind that matters?”

“Don’t get smart with me, girl. And I think it’s in the bedroom.”

“Again.”

“What did I ju—”

“Thanks, Dad.”

“Man, kids these days. No good snots.”

“So, what did you get to see?”

“Huh? See? Where?”

“The show.”

“Oh, in the bedroom and the shower.”

“What kind of show was this. Please tell me it was a home improvement show?”

“Nah, those guys have nothing on this—”

‘”Dad!”

“In the camper!”

“Thanks, Dad.”

“Uh, did you guys just get back from a trip?”

“Yeah, how’d you know?”

“Well, you left the bread in the camper.”

“Bread? What bread?”

“For your daughter’s sandwich.”

“What sandwich?”

“What the? The peanut butter and jelly sandwich she’s making.”

Once again, Bill’s eyes narrowed in deep thought. And deeper. And still deeper. So deep this time, he came out speaking English with a funny accent.

He said, slapping his knee. “You don’t put strawberry jelly on a peanut butter sandwich, you dumb hick. You use mayonnaise.”

At this point, I shook my head, concerned the grinding gears inside might begin to seize from frustration.

“I gotcha. You’ll never believe it. It was hosted by Je—”

“Thanks, Dad. I found it.”

“I’m glad, princess. You believe what this hick thought you were doing. He thought you were making a peanut butter and strawberry jelly sandwich.”

“Mister, everyone knows you put mayonnaise on them.”


This is an attempt to use some of what our guest writer today, from Reedsy, Desiree Villena wrote in her article 5 Unexpected Ways to Ineject Humor Into Your Writing.


 © 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

5 Unexpected Ways to Inject Humor Into Your Writing

Let’s be honest, the business of being humorous can be very un-fun. Good writers make comedy seem easy and natural, but you never really know how much concentrated effort goes into each funny scene and amusing conversation. Not everyone can call on their wittiest self at the snap of their fingers — and on top of that, we don’t all appreciate the same kind of humor.

 

That said, there are some general ways to be funnier in your writing. Whether you’re composing a poem, publishing a book, or writing an article, here are five ways to flex your humor muscles! (Spoiler alert: it does not involve scrolling through endless memes and waiting for osmosis to transport all that good-natured banter into your brain.)

1. Imagine you’re talking to your funniest friend

Everyone has someone in their lives who they can always rely on for a good laugh. Or someone whose company makes them feel more comical in conversation. It’s the atmosphere that they create — relaxed, carefree, lighthearted — which brings joyful ideas into your head.

When you’re writing a humorous scene or an amusing article, try dipping your pen into that atmosphere by imagining that you, or your character, are talking to this wonderful, laid-back person. It’s a first step toward putting you at ease, and letting your inherent humor shine through! You may find the tone of your writing lightens considerably. And sometimes, even more so than momentous punchlines or top-notch puns, this can make all the difference to your readers’ experience.

Now that you’re in the right mood, let’s jump into some more specific tricks.

2. Apply the Rule of Three

I like to think that three is the magic number for almost everything — often, characters come in trios, stories happen in three acts, and meals are consumed in three courses. And in comedy, the Rule of Three is rather well-known. It dictates that when listing three things in succession, you can create a pattern with the first two and then misdirect with the last — and there you have your punchline.

You’ll catch a lot of comedians doing this on a daily basis, from John Oliver to Trevor Noah (it’ll be hard not to notice, now that the cat is out of the bag). Check out this little verse by Bill Engleson, in response to Haiku challenge 321, to see the Rule of Three at work in satirical poetry. Or watch any classic NBC comedy — again, it’ll be impossible not to notice it now!

3. Have a “wait for it” moment

With the Rule of Three, you don’t wait to deliver the punchline. But with other forms of humor, a little pause before the deciding word or phrase is an easy and useful way to deliver a bit. Given that you’re writing, rather than speaking, a “pause” of sorts can also help you set the tone and let the audience know that you’re telling a joke, without having to say so. This is something to keep in mind if you’re a naturally sarcastic writer whose humor requires a bit of context.

To do this, simply use an ellipsis (…) or an em-dash (—) to indicate a pause in speech. Remember, though, that this trick shouldn’t be overused. Not only can it disrupt the flow of the writing, but it can also make your joke seem obvious, which is not what any writer wants. There’s a fine balance to maintain when you want to appear effortlessly humorous.

4. Use words with plosives

Being funny often comes down to a single word, because apparently, some words are funnier than others. Not just because they sound made-up, like bumfuzzle or codswallop, but because they contain sounds that are supposedly more amusing. These sounds are called plosives, and are associated with letters such as b, p, d, k, t, and g. You can see how the examples I listed exhibit this phonetic quality — and how even simply replacing other letters with these might make a serious word sound more humorous. (“That’s why they call it murder and not muckduck.”)

What you can do when writing is remain mindful of plosives when picking your words. It’s a minor thing, but again, it helps to build the playful tone in your piece. Instead of searching, why not use fumbling? Instead of shocked, why not flabbergasted? Even small changes like these can make your writing sound 100% funnier.

5. Share an anecdote

You can strategically think your way through a comedic scene or paragraph, but you can also tell a hilarious story — that is, if you’ve got one that fits the theme. Stories are always a wonderful way to connect with people, so if there’s a personal experience that you found hilarious, share it in your writing!

Anecdotes are also the perfect tool for bloggers and non-fiction writers, because they inject personality into your writing. Even un-funny ones can make a great hook or introduction to an article — imagine what a genuinely funny one might do.

Those are some tips to help you set a cheery mood and inject humor into your writing, whatever the form or style. Remember to keep a light heart, not think about it too much, and always get someone to read your work before it goes live (just to make sure you’re not being too funny) — and you’ll turn out just fine.


Desiree Villena is a writer with Reedsy, a marketplace that connects authors and publishers with the world’s best editors, designers, and marketers. In her spare time, Desiree enjoys reading contemporary fiction and writing short stories. She tries her best to be funny in writing and very occasionally succeeds.

© 2020- Desiree Villena Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

sate – a haiku poem

parched tongue falls

fear rising thirst

one drip sates


Please help me out collecting writing prompt challenges you’re aware of. Click here for my post from Friday ‘Poetry Challenges and Prompts‘. The links to the prompts you provide will be added to the Challenges/Prompts From the Blogosphere at the top of my blog.


My poem for my Haiku Poetry Prompt Challenge. https://ronovanwrites.com/2020/10/12/ronovan-writes-weekly-haiku-poetry-prompt-challenge-327-drip-drop/.

 © 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 327 DRIP & DROP Please See Beginning Request,

Hello to all, I have a request to make: Click here for my post from Friday ‘Poetry Challenges and Prompts‘.

It’s asking you to:

  1. Link to challenges or prompts you are aware of, preferably to a how-to participate page, if not, then a current challenge.
  2. One sentence description of the challenge/prompt. NOT REQUIRED (This would just be saving me time.)
  3. Host’s name if you got it, if not, I can get it. NOT REQUIRED (This would just be saving me time.)

I want to participate in some prompts to stretch the creative muscles AND I have created a page at the top of my blog with all the prompt links provided so far, or at least the ones I’ve been able to get to and AS LONG AS THEY ARE FOR WRITING. This will be for you to find new places to write and for anyone wandering by to click on and find something. Here’s the page. It’s nothing fancy, no images or anything like that. Just straight up text and tone. I’ll probably add something later. You know me, I can’t leave anything alone.

Thank you to those already helping out, and to anyone else who joins in.



Drop by on Wednesday for the Décima Poetry Challenge. Sometimes the two challenges have similar themes you can unite over the week.

Check out the COMMENTS for entries this week, and come back throughout the week to see more links to poems as they come in.

Click HERE for last week’s collected links for easy access to the poems of last week’s poets.

Click HERE. To learn about the new style I’ve created called Shi Rensa Haiku and how to write one, maybe even for the challenges.



How to write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Drip, Drop
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster Dictionary

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  1.  
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
    • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


The Challenge Words!

DRIP & DROP

Not sure how to write a Haiku? Click HERE for a quick How to write Haiku Poem in English Form with links to posts for other forms of Haiku.

Much Respect-Much Love

Ronovan


 


 

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Haiku Challenge 326 Poets Collected.

Links to the 22 Poets from last week’s challenge of SCORCH & SHADE and their haiku. All links open in a new window when clicked on.

Very good variety this week. Nature, politics, love, senusuality, scorn, and more. At least that’s how I interpreted them. Even a Shi Rensa and some Tankas.

Haiku Poetry Challenge Links Collected Image

Charmed Chaos: Autumn Leaves


William Thomas Engleson:

http://www.engleson.ca

Penalty Shot

In the shade of gist
Covid is Nature’s price, her
Scorched Earth policy.


Bob Fairfield:  https://bobfairfield.org/2020/10/07/ronovan-writes-haiku-challenge-326/


Breathing Shallow Poetry:  Scorching Tribulations – Z & Z Poetry


Geetha Balvannanathan’s Blog:  prince-of-peace-anew   6 Haiku this week.


Goutam’s Writings: Day of the Sunflowers – Goutam’s Writings


Laura McHarrie | The Hidden Edge: The Harvest     A Shi Rensa


J-Dubs Grin and Bear It: Haiku – Scorch & Shade 10/5/20 – J-Dubs Grin and Bear It   Tanka.


Jewish Young Professional: Urban Decay Naked Heat Eyeshadow Palette


LSS Attitude of Gratitude: Ronovan Writes Haiku – Scorch & Shade – ❀ Welcome To LSS Attitude of Gratitude❀ 


Mindfills:  september-a-tanka           


Mukhamani (Lakshmi Bhat}: Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 326 SCORCH & SHADE – Mukhamani


Mystical Strings: Rivalry     


Prairie Chat: Haiku Challenge (10/6/20) – PrairieChat    


Queen Nandini:  My Haikus with the Words Scorch and Shade | queennandini  


Quilted Poetry: Shelter from the sun   A Tanka


Ronovan Writes:  

Our Past Our Future – a Haibun poem

The Burning At The Lake


somawrites: swing


They, You and Me: heat


Tina Stewart Brakebill:  color of change


To Wear a Rainbow:  quarantine


WillowDot21: Ronovanwrite’s Weekly Haiku Challenge Poetry Prompt #Challenge 326 SCORCH & SHADE | willowdot21 


© 2020- Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Future – A Haiku Poem

peaceful the lilies

spread across the fresh-turned earth

genesis is sowed

 

ronovans haiku image



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@RonovanWrites

Visit and Follow!

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 © 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Poetry Challenges and Prompts?

IHello Y’all,

I’m looking to participate in some poetry challenges, and writing challenges, other than my own, and thought maybe some of you could put links in the comments to your favorites. And maybe a one-sentence blurb of what it’s about. Not a necessary thing though.

The links you provide will appear on a page, Challenges/PromptsFrom the Blogsphere, at the top of my blog, as long as they are writing-related and preferably not too naughty. If they are naughty, just let me know and I can make a note by the link.

Don’t worry if someone has already put your choice in, put it anyway. That just shows me how popular it is. Also, you can give more than one challenge site.

The sites could be:

  • poetry prompts
  • writing prompt sites in general
  • Flash Fiction
  • It can be an image that is meant to inspire a written word response. (Or typed word, for you literal types.)

I would like to start doing some fiction as well. I’m editing a few books for authors now, and writing my own but need a creative brain break to do something entirely off the plot.

If you facilitate a prompt/challenge then please comment with the link and a little blurb of what it is. As few words as possible.

This will help me, who always forgets where to go, and it’ll be good for people visiting this post to find some prompt sites.

I’ll be making a page with the prompt sites you provide, and the prompt/challenge. If you can provide a small blurb of what it’s about, that would be great, but it’s not required. The site link is what is a must. With the page, we all can easily find them, or at least I can.

I’d like to start up my Friday Fiction prompt again but I would not be as involved as I was before when I was reading and critiquing each story, providing feedback, and some technical information. It’s more difficult to come up with prompts than you might think. If readers show some interest in it, I might start it up. I know of a couple of people who ended up becoming authors after participating. And no, I’m not counting you, and you know who you are. Although I want to. And technically it’s true. 😀

My two poetry prompts are:

Thanks ahead of time. And please do give some great ones.

Much Respect,

Ronovan

P.S. If you see any extra letter ‘t’s in the above, forgive me. My ‘t’ key is apparently on the way out. It is super sensitive right now a I end up with two or three ‘t’s sometimes. I had to edit three words in this P.S. message alone. 🙂



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 © 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ron’s Favorite Things!

Ron’s Favorite Things!

Subject to change as I come across others.

Favorite Movies

  1. The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975)
  2. Blade Runner (1982)
  3. Ghost in the Shell (1996) (Anime)
  4. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (2001)
  5. Wonder Woman (2017)

Favorite Books

  1. Maestro, John Gardner
  2. The Cat Who Ate Danish Modern, Lilian Jackson Braun
  3. LOTR, J. R. R. Tolkien
  4. The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald
  5. Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins

Favorite Music

  1. The Beatles
  2. George Michael
  3. Glenn Miller
  4. R.E.M.
  5. Harry Styles

Favorite Food (I’m plant-based now but…)

  1. An authentic Mexican restaurant Taco
  2. Baked Potato topped with olive oil and a pinch of salt (Or anything.)
  3. Chinese rice noodles with garlic and vegetables
  4. Pinto Beans and Cornbread (Life’s blood as a child in the South.)
  5. Soup

Favorite Animals

  1. English Bulldog
  2. Cat
  3. Beluga Whale
  4. Sea Lion
  5. Elephant

Favorite Words

  1. Serene
  2. Ocean
  3. Breeze
  4. She
  5. Sleep

Favorite Color

  1. Royal Blue

Visit and Follow Me

  1. Amazon
  2. GoodReads
  3. Twitter
  4. Instagram

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 © 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

The Burning At The Lake – A poem

from deep dark, he rose

to spread wings, to fly and scorch

the men of the lake

 

My poem for my Haiku Poetry Prompt Challenge. https://ronovanwrites.com/2020/10/05/ronovan-writes-weekly-haiku-poetry-prompt-challenge-326-scorch-shade/.

 © 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Long Gone – A poem.

Long Gone

I loved those days, him in his swing,

and those when he giggled to swim.

Hopes to play in the big boy gym,

or watch Pooh and Pig’et and sing.

 

Now I see him sinking, drowning,

‘neath pressure not meant his to be.

I reach out to lift the weight free,

receiving rebukes for my care.

Being told it’s not my affair,

just a father in name only.

 

My entry for this week’s Décima Poetry Challenge No. 26 SWING.

© 2020- Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 26 (SWING) This week, it’s the A rhyme line.

I chose the word SWING this week.

You may, if you wish, make some kind of link between the Haiku Challenge prompt of (SCORCH & SHADOW). and SWING.

The 2 CHALLENGES are SEPARATE but CAN BE combined if YOU CHOOSE to do so.

As you may know, if you write a haiku you could:

  • Take your haiku and carry its theme into your Décima poem. This does not mean add the Haiku to your Décima unless you just want to. But/and you could add the link to your Haiku into your Décima post somewhere.

  • It can either support the haiku, enhance it through the opportunity of more lines, or completely turn the theme on its head and write an argument against the haiku message, which is kind of what a Décima is for, writing a counter to another Décima.

  • If you wrote a true nature haiku, you could flip its message into one about humans and the man-made world around us, such as politics, society, and even love. Yes, love is a man-made thing. At least among the humans. I suppose it could be a penguin-made thing among the penguins.

  • You may also if you like, try to use the Haiku Challenge words in your Décima somewhere. In fact, we have a lady that’s pretty consistent in doing that. And does so with such ease, you don’t even realize she’s done it unless you know she does it and look for it.


Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for STILL, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc with a choice of a break between line 4 and 5, then being abba accddc, which I use in my example below.


Example, if I say in the subject line of the post:

“…(FALL) This week it’s the B rhyme line.”

my Décima might be…

NO!

As the end wept upon the land,

we could hear the approaching fall.

Justice answered the trumpet’s call,

trusting the fight to her troop’s hand.

 

Fate trembles with haste to expand,

through misdeeds by her shameless foe.

Past foolish decisions now crow,

“Wait—no—this was not meant to be.”

They beg the nation, “Hear our plea.

Heal honor, shout, no…no… NO!”

 

Notice the example prompt word ‘FALL’ is in line 2, the first B line, and its rhyme in is in line 3, matching the rhyming pattern of abba accddc.


For today’s challenge, the word SWING must be one of the A line words. Then the other A line(s) word(s) must rhyme with SWING.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Décima Challenge 25 Poets Collected

12 Poets from last week’s challenge of STILL and their Décimas. All links open in a new window when clicked on.

Nice to see some join in that missed the previous week. That almost made up for the ones out this week. Crazy world right now. I’ll do a better prompt word for #26 and it’s in the A rhyme spot so this should be good.

Decima Challenge Poets Collected Image

Arthur Richardson | Poems, Polemicks and Licks: https://arthurrichardson.org/2020/09/30/haiku-and-decima-challenge/


http://www.engleson.ca

The Debate

At the heart of a good debate
might be ideas proffered well,
a give, a take, a stunning swell
of thought on what might be our fate.

But no, not this, to decimate,
to thrash with rage, with vitriol,
the man, his clan; this playground brawl
demeans us all, a sadness, yet still
we watched until we had our fill,
grieving for what might next befall.


Frank Hubeny:  Still – Holy Spirit – Poetry, Short Prose and Walking 


The Hidden Edge:  Gin – Laura McHarrie @ The Hidden Edge


Like Mercury Colliding: if only… | like mercury colliding… 


Mindfills: ghost-a-decima/


MMA Storytime: And Still…


Mystical Strings: Call to Rest #Decima #Poem | Mystical Strings 


Revived Writer: Truly | revivedwriter


Ronovan Writes:

Someday – a poem. | ronovanwrites

Mad Mad…what was I talking about again? A poem. | ronovanwrites


The Tenth Zodiac: Behind those Eyes – The_tenth_zodiac


willowdot21:  Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 25 (STILL) This week, it’s the D rhyme line. | willowdot21


© 2020- Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Mad Mad…what was I talking about again? A poem.

Today, Tuesday, October 6th, is Mad Hatter Day, so get your imbecilic nonsense on. I know I did.

Mad Mad…what was I talking about again?

I’m neither here nor there but yonder
smudging the windows of your pains.
Did you know I’ve been seen in seines,
while you stink of Salamander?

Have I seen a girl, much blonder,
than that tailored swift one just there?
Such a question is plain not fair,
I’ll be the hook of her next trill.
But she’ll not catch me standing still
for I’ll pull out my Joyn Mayair.

What was I talking about again poetry image Mad Hatter.

 

You might have a bit of fun figuring out some of the words and how they’re used in the story of the poem. Some happened by accident when I read back through. And with a little word change here and there, it jelled. I even ventured into the Lord of the Rings stories, but fortunately thought better.

My entry for this week’s Décima Poetry Challenge No. 25 STILL.

© 2020- Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Our Past Our Future – a Haibun poem

earth blisters from guilt

of mankind’s ignorance,

shade is cast on all

Remember this is a rambler of a thought withoutt editing, so it went where it went. Enjoy or scream.

The environment has been a concern since Adam took his first breath. Actually, it was before then. God did make the Garden of Eden. Note to some, the Garden was in Eden, not named Eden. You wouldn’t believe how that’s not taught in Sunday School. But back to my thoughts. Environmentalists and the casual green supporters consider they do all they can to stop the killing of our planet. But, none of us really do. We all take, but we can never truly give back in equal measure what we take. There is only so much matter on the planet and it’s recycled every day in one form or the other. But each time, a bit more is lost in the processing. There is always processing. You grow the tomato plant organically from the compost and fertilizer you gathered for the purpose. The plants grow and give. You take. You consume. And then you recycle back into the world. No matter how you recycle it, some is lost in the process by your body. I guess maybe we should just stop having babies and eat up all the cows and pigs and chickens as well as all the other types of animals we raise. So long Emu and Ostrich. Yum.

Yes, I’m being weird today, but this is one of my stream of thought posts that I like to do sometimes. I’m not even sure what I started out to write anymore. But I think it was basically that we all need to do more, go above and beyond what we think we need to do in order to keep this planet burning and turning into a ball of nothing but a sky filled with swirling dust that once was meant to feed living, breathing creatures of all kinds. Then next year? Step it up another notch. Reduce, Reuse, Recycle? About Reduce, Reduce, Reuse, Reuse, Recycle?

Our Past Our Future poetry image

Shade here is not one of the traditional dictionary definitions.

The term can be found in Jane Austen‘s novel Mansfield Park (1814). Young Edmund Bertram is displeased with a dinner guest’s disparagement of the uncle who took her in: “With such warm feelings and lively spirits it must be difficult to do justice to her affection for Mrs. Crawford, without throwing a shade on the Admiral.”

In other words, it’s an insult but an insult of another level.

The first major use of “shade” that introduced the slang to the greater public was in Jennie Livingston‘s documentary film, Paris Is Burning (1990), about the mid-1980s drag scene in Manhattan.[2][4] In the documentary, one of the drag queens, Dorian Corey, explains that shade derives from “reading”, the “real art form of insults”. Shade is a developed form of reading: “Shade is, I don’t tell you you’re ugly. But I don’t have to tell you, because you know you’re ugly. And that’s shade.”

I’ve seen the documentary and I can attest to the truth that shade is a whole other level of insult. If done correctly, it’s done with style, grace, and directly to your face.

See quotes in Throw Shade Wikipedia.

My poem for my Haiku Poetry Prompt Challenge. https://ronovanwrites.com/2020/10/05/ronovan-writes-weekly-haiku-poetry-prompt-challenge-326-scorch-shade/.

 © 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Someday – a poem.

Someday

I had the plan, so close to shore,

then with one word, it all shattered.

That just proved I never mattered,

that I wasn’t wanted anymore.

~

It will come, that day we yearn for,

the one we share in our night dreams.

Remember our night of moonbeams,

when the air went quiet and still?

Love so large, the stars could not fill,

yet, I must wait, through muffled screams.

 

 

My entry for this week’s Décima Poetry Challenge No. 25 STILL. (A New Challenge here on ronovanwrites.com)

Poetry Lost Mind Image

© 2020-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 326 SCORCH & SHADE

Note: I’ve changed the syllable counter I link to. My antivirus has been giving me a ‘blocked threat’ message the last several times I tried it. It could be an error, but this one works nicely. Just put your entire Haiku in.

Drop by on Wednesday for the Décima Poetry Challenge. Sometimes the two challenges have similar themes you can unite over the week.

Check out the COMMENTS for entries this week, and come back throughout the week to see more links to poems as they come in.

Click HERE for last week’s collected links for easy access to the poems of last week’s poets.

Click HERE. To learn about the new style I’ve created called Shi Rensa Haiku and how to write one, maybe even for the challenges.



How to write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Shade, Scorch
SyllableCounter.net
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster Dictionary

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help, visit HowManySyllables.com. (You would be surprised at how many syllables some words actually have.)
    • Words have different definitions and you use the definitions that work for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  1.  
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
    • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


The Challenge Words!

SCORCH&SHADE

Not sure how to write a Haiku? Click HERE for a quick How to write Haiku Poem in English Form with links to posts for other forms of Haiku.

Much Respect-Much Love

Ronovan


 


 

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Haiku Challenge 325 Poets Collected.

Links to the 27 Poets with around 40 Poems from last week’s challenge of CALM & STORM and their haiku. All links open in a new window when clicked on.

Wow, a great amount of involvement this week. I guess the pressure is on to come up with another good pair of prompt words.

Haiku Poetry Challenge Links Collected Image

Annette Rochelle Aben: center | Annette Rochelle Aben


Bill Engleson:

http://www.engleson.ca

within

would that I could be
that aura of calm before
the storm swallowed me.


Bob Fairfield:   https://bobfairfield.org/2020/09/28/ronovan-writes-haiku-weekly-prompt325/


Breathing Shallow Poetry:   Storms Guaranteed (tanka) – Breathing Shallow Poetry


Geetha Balvannanathan’s Blog: https://geethaprodhom.wordpress.com/2020/10/01/the-waters-flowed-calm/  I wasn’t going to include the number of Haiku people wrote this week, but she wrote 7. I had to note that.


Help from Heaven: Be Encouraged: All Storms End! – Help from Heaven    


The Hidden Edge: The Pandemic – (Weekly Haiku Prompt #325) – Laura McHarrie @ The Hidden Edge    


J-Dubs Grin and Bear It:  Haiku – Calm & Storm 9/28/20 – J-Dubs Grin and Bear It   


Like Mercury Colliding:  if only… | like mercury colliding… A challenges combo of the Haiku and Décima prompts


LSS Attitude of Gratitude: Ronovan Writes Haiku – Challenge 325 – Calm & Storm – ❀ Welcome To LSS Attitude of Gratitude❀


Mindfills:  https://mindfills.wordpress.com/2020/09/28/grey-jay-a-haiku/        


Mukhamani (Lakshmi Bhat}:  Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 325 CALM & STORM – Mukhamani           


Mystical Strings: Panic Button #Poem | Mystical Strings    


Prairie Chat: Haiku Challenge (9/21/20) – PrairieChat 


Queen Nandini:   My Haikus with the words Calm and Storm | queennandini


Quilted Poetry:  I Promise You | #RonovanWrites #Haiku #Challenge 325 Calm+Storm – Quilted Poetry    


Ronovan Writes:  

Indignant Nature – a poem | ronovanwrites

They Thirst Alone – a tanka poem | ronovanwrites

Pray Good Sense – a Shi Rensa poem | ronovanwrites


Scraps From Life:   https://scraps-from-life.blogspot.com/2020/10/the-rainbow-peace.html?m=1   


Sketching Words: https://sketchingwords.com/2020/09/28/ronovan-writes-weekly-haiku-poetry-prompt-challenge-325/


Straight From My Heart: Foretelling – Straight From My Heart      A Shi Rensa.


The Bag Lady:  Ronovanwrites Weekly Haiku Poetry Prompt 9-28-20 – The Bag Lady


The Tenth Zodiac: Ronovan Writes – Weekly Haiku Challenge #325 – The_tenth_zodiac


They, You and Me: what matters… | They, You and Me


Thoughts and Entanglements:  Moon – Haibun | thoughts and entanglements  


Tina Stewart Brakebill:  Haiku – Calm & Storm 9/28/20 – J-Dubs Grin and Bear It


To Wear a Rainbow: true love… | To Wear A Rainbow


WillowDot21: Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 325 CALM & STORM | willowdot21


© 2020- Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Pray Good Sense – a Shi Rensa poem

Pray Good Sense

by

Ronovan

~

gulf storms and sea swells

waves ravage innocent sands

calm beauty returns

*

calm beauty returns

at the final gust of breath

the ear knows silence

*

the ear knows silence

and the roaring void is hope

the listless will stir

*

the listless will stir

when empty truths are laid bare

pray good sense prevails

 

Pray Good Sense Shi Rensa poem on image.

 

 

My Shi Rensa for my Haiku Poetry Prompt Challenge. https://ronovanwrites.com/2020/09/28/ronovan-writes-weekly-haiku-poetry-prompt-challenge-325-calm-storm/.

To learn more about my poetry form please click HERE.

 © 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 25 (STILL) This week, it’s the D rhyme line.

I chose the word STILL this week to help those who might want to combine it with their haiku for Monday’s Haiku Challenge prompt of (CALM & STORM).

The 2 CHALLENGES are SEPARATE but CAN BE combined if YOU CHOOSE to do so.

As you may know, if you did write a haiku you can:

  • Take your haiku and carry its theme into your Décima poem.

  • It can either support the haiku, enhance it through the opportunity of more lines, or completely turn the theme on its head and write an argument against the haiku message, which is kind of what a Décima is for, writing a counter to another Décima.

  • If you wrote a true nature haiku, you could flip its message into one about humans and the man-made world around us, such as politics, society, and even love. Yes, love is a man-made thing. At least among the humans. I suppose it could be a penguin-made thing among the penguins.

  • You may also if you like, try to use the Haiku Challenge words in your Décima somewhere. In fact, we have a lady that’s pretty consistent in doing that. And does so with such ease, you don’t even realize she’s done it unless you know she does it and look for it.


Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for LOOK, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc with a choice of a break between line 4 and 5, then being abba accddc, which I use in my example below.


Example, if I say in the subject line of the post:

“…(FALL) This week it’s the B rhyme line.”

my Décima might be…

NO!

As the end wept upon the land,

we could hear the approaching fall.

Justice answered the trumpet’s call,

trusting the fight to her troop’s hand.

 

Fate trembles with haste to expand,

through misdeeds by her shameless foe.

Past foolish decisions now crow,

“Wait—no—this was not meant to be.”

They beg the nation, “Hear our plea.

Heal honor, shout, no…no… NO!”

 

Notice the example prompt word ‘FALL’ is in line 2, the first B line, and its rhyme in is in line 3, matching the rhyming pattern of abba accddc.


For today’s challenge, the word STILL must be one of the D line words. Then the other D line(s) word(s) must rhyme with STILL.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.