Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 23 (FALL) This week, it’s the B rhyme line.

This week’s prompt works perfectly with the Haiku Challenge prompt of (CLIP & WINGS), so you could do a haiku with those words for one post and continue your poetry message/story with the Décima prompt of FALL.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (CLIP & WINGS this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for FALL, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word FALL must be one of the B line words. Then the other B line(s) word(s) must rhyme with FALL.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 22 (BLEND) This week, it’s the A rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (Cup & Sip this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for BLEND, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word BLEND must be one of the A line words. Then the other A line(s) word(s) must rhyme with BLEND .

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

But Never the Biebs- a poem.

But Never the Biebs

Do you think you’re out of your class?

Does your breath bring weeping to eyes?

No matter how small all hope dies?

All things come but they also pass.

 

Don’t fret, you can be in disguise.

Like Hugh Jackman…maybe Brad Pitt?

Or as low as a Tay Tay Brit?

I guess I’ll give you just one tip

You may fall far but don’t dream slip.

Failure is when you choose to quit.

 

My entry for this week’s Décima Poetry Challenge No. 21 TIP.

Ronovan Writes poetry image standard

© 2020-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 21 (TIP) This week, it’s the D rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (Morrow & Surge this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for SMILE, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word TIP must be one of the D line words. Then the other D line(s) word(s) must rhyme with TIP.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ew Gross or A Stalker Gawk Cur- a poem.

Ew, Gross

or

A Stalker Gawk Cur

A Taco Bell date got you cussed.

That former flame turned out her light

when your wallet became too tight.

Your love life has turned into dust,

and now Friday nights are a bust.

Your face is a lunatic smile

while stalking her twitter profile.

Dude, that brain of lust should be trussed.

 

 

Not good at all, but I needed to write. So, I did.

 

My entry for this week’s Décima Poetry Challenge No. 20 SMILE. (A New Challenge here on ronovanwrites.com)

Ronovan Writes poetry image standard

© 2020-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 20 (SMILE) This week, it’s the C rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (Day & Flaw this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for SMILE, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word SMILE must be one of the C line words. Then the other C line(s) word(s) must rhyme with SMILE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 19 (RIDE) This week, it’s the B rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (Trip & Whip this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for STAY, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduleD Décima Poetry Challenge how to and what not.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word RIDE must be one of the B line words. Then the other B line(s) word(s) must rhyme with RIDE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

A Boy’s Folly – a poem.

A Boy’s Folly

It’s that happy time of the day

When crickets crick and froggies frog

And pirates sing after their grog

On paradise beach huge waves spray.

Then from the dunes comes a girl’s, “HEY!”

Up pops a boy not beyond eight,

Running from a fine lass’ fast gait.

She wasn’t happy not at all.

Her top parts hid by a beach ball.

When Sis nabs him, he won’t see straight.

 

My entry for this week’s Décima Poetry Challenge No. 18 STAY. here on Ronovan Writes.

Ronovan Writes poetry image standard

© 2020-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 18 (STAY) This week, it’s the A rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (Meet and Part this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for PRIZE, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word STAYmust be one of the A line words. Then the other A line(s) word(s) must rhyme with STAY.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

To Have Love – a poem.

To Have Love

With the last sun’s set, I now know,

through passion and prayer, I willed,

my mind, my heart, my soul be filled

with your love, bright like the sun’s glow.

Now the light in my world will grow.

Each moment is like a new day,

with a brand new story to say.

For inspiration to be wise,

being given the finest prize,

I’ll pen for you a rondelet*.

 

 

*coming Thursday.

The Love 2020 Series

Volume One: To Know LoveShi Rensa Haiku

Volume Two: To Have Love –  Décima

Volume Three: My Love Always – Rondelet poem (Link is active at 08:00 EDT, Thursday, 08/06/2020)

Vbe considered Part 2 of my  To Know Love written for my Haiku Challenge (Eye&Light). Both are standalone poems, but I continued the Shi Rensa message/story with today’s Décima.

My entry for this week’s Décima Poetry Challenge No. 17 PRIZE. (A Newish Challenge here on ronovanwrites.com)

Ronovan Writes poetry image standard

© 2020-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 17 (PRIZE) This week, it’s the D rhyme line.

That’s right everybody. I went there. I gave you the D rhyme… and with this word of all the words in the world. Don’t hate me because you’ve been challenged. Hate me because I’m beautifully insignificant.

But I really chose the word because it went well with the theme of the challenges this week. You can do a part two of your haiku if you did one, and if you want to go in that direction.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (Eye and Light this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for GROW, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word PRIZE must be one of the D line words. Then the other D line(s) word(s) must rhyme with PRIZE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Now Democracy – a poem.

Now Democracy

Life is a spec of illusion

in this moment of history,

in this hour for empathy,

we are ripe with no delusion.

 

To  gain victory’s conclusion

into the storm’s eye, we must go,

against the rage-fueled inferno.

With spirit of a promised land,

and power of the strong right hand,

freedom fires in our hearts shall grow.

 

My entry for this week’s Décima Poetry Challenge No. 16 GROW. (A New Challenge here on ronovanwrites.com)

Ronovan Writes poetry image standard

© 2020-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 16 (GROW) This week, it’s the C rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge that often has prompts (Destruct and Self this week) that share a central theme, at least in my head, with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  1. To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for KIND, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the C rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word GROW must be one of the C line words. Then the other C line(s) word(s) must rhyme with GROW.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

To Peace and Pride- a poem.

To Peace and Pride

Souls seek to make right the wrong,

by the resetting of the mind,

and the relearning to be kind…

the steps of healing… will be strong.

 

The path of progress will be long,

first highs then lows to overcome,

by strength, by faith we’ll succumb.

With the liberties of this land,

equally in each person’s hand…

peace and pride… will finally come.

 

My entry for this week’s Décima Poetry Challenge No. 15 KIND. (A New Challenge here on ronovanwrites.com)

to peace and pride poem as PNG image.

© 2020-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 15 (KIND) This week, it’s the B rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge that often has prompts (Chimpanzee&Kiss this week) that share a central theme, at least in my head, with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word KIND must be one of the B line words. Then the other B line(s) word(s) must rhyme with KIND.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Doomed Duck- a poem.

It feels like this brain’s been interred,

for I can’t seem to get inspired.

My genius has expired, it’s tired.

Oops, did Daffy just gird his bird?

 

Aargh, this confounded absurd word.

I’m just too stubborn to admit,

I should’ve ducked, I should’ve quit.

This head up here is Grade…A…Prime.

I never have grief with a rhyme.

It’s done, never shook, not one bit.

 

 

 

One week I do an alliteration Décima. Now this week, this catastrophe. Next week I’ll write one on Sunday before everyone else writes the good ones. I like to be original. Even if it is originally bad. (Maybe I’ll write the Décima first, then pick the challenge word. Yeah, that”s the ticket.)

My entry for this week’s Décima Poetry Challenge No. 14 BIRD. (A New Challenge here on ronovanwrites.com)

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 14 (BIRD) This week, it’s the A rhyme line.

This week, I recommend going with a synonym. There aren’t a lot of natural rhymes for BIRD. I used a word generator this week, just to see what happened. I did it with the Haiku Challenge as well. I thought it interesting the three words that came up, under a search for each word alone.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge that often has prompts (Finger&Planet this week) that share a central theme, at least in my head, with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.

For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.

For today’s challenge, the word BIRD must be one of the A line words. Then the other A line(s) word(s) must rhyme with BIRD.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Suppressed Youth – a poem in plain English… sort of.

This is what the alliteration masterpiece of yesterday meant, in almost plain English.

 

Good old boys with their good old ways,

influence minds newer of thought,

who know what voters want and sought.

Life long hand shakers give crass gaze,

causing new hopes dashed in a haze.

The old guard’s ways stay close and true.

Their weak platform made young minds spew.

Leaders are out of touch with time,

while hard-fought wins are in their prime.

Toady Congress brought want for new.

 

 

My entry for this week’s Décima Poetry Challenge No. 12 TRUE. (A New Challenge here on ronovanwrites.com)

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Suppressed Youth – a poem.

Daily dancing dalliance,

invades innocent intentions,

in insightful interventions.

Stately statesmen stage stalwart stance,

choking challengers’ cheerful chance.

Tragic traditions translate true.

Flawed floor flaunted… fledgling flames flew.

Strictly strait strategy stride’s strange.

Chad champions chiming–choose change.

Crap Congress crafted crowds craved crew.

 

 

I am never trying this again. Well, at least not for another week…or three.

My entry for this week’s Décima Poetry Challenge No. 12 TRUE. (A New Challenge here on ronovanwrites.com)

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 13 (TRUE) This week, it’s the C rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge that often has prompts (Dwindle&Ripple this week) that share a central theme, at least in my head, with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.

For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.

For today’s challenge, the word TRUE must be one of the C line words. Then the other C line(s) word(s) must rhyme with TRUE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.