Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 429 NOSE and Twitch.

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

NOSE

Twitch

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.


 

How to Write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


 

 

Haiku Challenge

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #28. Use BALANCE as your inspiration this week.

One of the difficult things in life to achieve, balance. But is it really balance people want? I suppose to each person the word has its own meaning. Do we want our lives to be balanced with good and evil? Do all people even agree on what is good and evil or in fact is there evil at all? Or good? Is balance more of the idea how we measure out our daily lives in order to survive, to survive happily, financially happy? Is it more a love thing vs all else? As I’m writing I’m considering all of the possibilities that might be included in ones balance. It’s whirlwind of a seesaw.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 428 FLICKER and Eyes.

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

FLICKER

Eyes

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.


How to Write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


 

Haiku Challenge

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #27. Use SOAR as your inspiration this week.

A strange word this week? Maybe. But imagine how your life has soared at some point. Even I have not had all low points. But of course with so many lows, things don’t need to rise to high to be considered soaring. Am I right? I find the problem is the drops after the soaring that is the problem. Even knowing the drop is going to come doesn’t seem to make it any easier to handle.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

In Course

In Course

rise up and be bright

for the day has not been planned

you are the helmsman

his is my entry for this weeks Haiku Poetry Challenge AIM and Guide.

There are details in the prompt on how to write a Haiku.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

© 2014-2022-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 427 AIM and Guide.

Often I use a prompt word with the intent of using a synonym instead. The reason I don’t use the synonym in the PROMPT itself is because it might seem limiting. I know not everyone uses the links below to see what the possibilities are. See if you can use a synonym this week for one of the words above. But you don’t have to.

 

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

AIM

Guide

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.


 

How to Write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


 

 

Haiku Challenge

Interested in being a Book Reviewer or other?

Lit World Interviews is a site I started many years ago where authors can get free online promotion.

Now I’m looking for some new Book Reviewers and people who have advice to share in the areas of Writing, Self-Publishing, and Book Promotion.

This is a great opportunity to share their opinions on books that sometimes are overlooked. Also to share the experience one might have that can help others achieve their dream of becoming an author with their book in the hands of readers.

LWI is a volunteer run site.

I would like to get some posts going again in regards to:

  • Book reviews
  • Self-publishing: Both the how to and promotion. Speaking from experience and/or sharing article links and advice from the pros. This tend to be our most viewed articles over time. Our former resident experts really knew their stuff.
  • If you writing/editing/style advice.

This isn’t an every week thing, or even once a month. It’s as you can do them.

email me at litworldinterviews @ gmail.com if you are interested.

It would be helpful if you include something from the following, so I can see work you may have done:

  • Which of the mentioned areas you would like to participate in.
  • Your site address, if you have one
  • Your name, of course
  • Your social media outlets. The ones you are willing to share posts on. And if you are willing to share the other posts from the site to Twitter, automatically. That’s how they CAN occur, but not MUST occur.
  • Your genre interests (I don’t really have a no genre approved list. But I’m sure something will come up someday. But I’m not looking for that one to occur.)
  • Links to any reviews you may have done on Amazon or Goodreads

email me at litworldinterviews @ gmail.com if you are interested.

Sincerely,

Ronovan

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #26. Use PERSISTENCE as your inspiration this week.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Reigns

Reigns

deep love leads the heart

in an ever hopeful fate

melancholy reigns

his is my entry for this weeks Haiku Poetry Challenge DEEP and Woe.

There are details in the prompt on how to write a Haiku.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

© 2014-2022-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 426 DEEP and Woe.

Often I use a prompt word with the intent of using a synonym instead. The reason I don’t use the synonym in the PROMPT itself is because it might seem limiting. I know not everyone uses the links below to see what the possibilities are. See if you can use a synonym this week for one of the words above. But you don’t have to.

 

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

DEEP

Woe

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.


How to Write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


 

Haiku Challenge

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #25. Use INSPIRATION as your inspiration this week.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Free Flowing

Free Flowing

be slow as turtles

heed little the passing time

like twigs flowing free

Free Flowing Poem Image stars in dark sky.

This is my entry for this weeks Haiku Poetry Challenge REED and Turtle.

There are details in the prompt on how to write a Haiku.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

© 2014-2022-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 425 REED and Turtle.

Did you know the Green Sea Turtle gets its color from the algae and seagrasses that it eats in its herbivore diet. Also, sea turtles cannot retract their heads or flippers into their shells.

 

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

REED

Turtle

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.


 

 

 

How to Write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


 

 

 

 

Haiku Challenge

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #24. Use ADVERSITY as your inspiration this week.

Adversity is constant. It may change its face, but it’s always present. Recently the thumb drive holding over 20 years worth of book ideas and first drafts went missing… and is still missing. It’s almost enough to make a person give up. This bit of adversity may seem trivial to some, and in some ways it is very trivial, but to me writing is a well for my sanity. Each idea and draft says something about where I was mentally at that moment in time. If you’ve followed here long enough you know about the other aspects of adversity I’ve faced. For me it seems loss is my ever changing faced Adversity.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Empty Skies

Empty Skies

clouds roll, billowing

dreams once gripped with joyous heart

blown from vacant skies

 

This is my entry for this weeks Haiku Poetry Challenge BLEW and Skies.

There are details in the prompt on how to write a Haiku.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

© 2014-2022-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 424 BLEW & Skies.

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

BLEW

Skies

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.


 

 

How to Write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


 

 

 

Haiku Challenge

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #23. Use ADVICE as your inspiration this week.

I’ve been given it and I’ve given it. I’ve taken it and I’ve not. But I’ve still listened each time and do learn. Even bad advice can do good… just by knowing who that advice is from, you might find out it’s good advice by how they’ve turned out.

So I guess I’m saying all advice is good, as long as you’re smart enough to know how to get the good out of it.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 423 FOWL and Weather.

This could be fun, or it might not be. Can’t wait to see what this one brings up.

 

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

FOWL

Weather

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.


 

How to Write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


 

 

Haiku Challenge

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #22. Use ACHIEVEMENT as your inspiration this week.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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The World Rolls

The World Rolls

the tide keeps rolling

steady through ages of time

empires rise and fall

 

This is my entry for this weeks Haiku Poetry Challenge ROLLING and Steady.

There are details in the prompt on how to write a Haiku.

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© 2014-2022-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.