Posted in Haiku Prompt Challenge

RonovanWrites #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge #206 Bliss&Brawn

Remember to come back and visit the comments section during the week for your fellow poets entries!

Haiku Poetry Prompt Writing Challenge Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Bliss, Brawn.
HowManySyllables.com
Thesaurus.com

 

Ronovan Writes Haiku Challenge Image 2016

The Guidelines are simple.

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like. The link above has links within it to articles about how to write Haibun, Tanka, and even a new form I created called Freku. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you likeinstead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help visit HowManySyllables.com. (You would be surprised at how many syllables some words actually have.)
  2. The two words can be used as you like. Words have different definitions and you can use the definitions you like. You can even use a synonym word as long as it does not change the meaning. Go to Thesaurus.com for Synonym help.
  3. Use the Tag of Ronovan Writes Haiku Challenge. This will help me find you in case you forget to ping back or leave your URL in the comments.
  4. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL  in a comment so we can all go and visit your site to see what you have done. You can do a ping back. What’s a ping back? Put the URL link in the address bar of this post, if you like, within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenges out, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing by more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running I get paid for by your visit. Click HERE for a detailed article on Ping Backs.
  5. You may copy one of the badges/images appearing in this post below or above and place it on your site if you wish, most normally use it within their post. I am not saying you need to, but if you would like to do so then go ahead. It is simply my way of saying thank you for participating. I sometimes make custom images for the week, if time and health permits.
  6. The Challenge currently BEGINS at 8 AM EST (New York City time) on Mondays. And a DEADLINE is Noon EST (New York City time) on the Sunday following the Challenge Post release.


The Challenge Words!

Bliss&Brawn

Not sure how to write a Haiku? Click HERE for a quick How to write Haiku Poem in English Form with links to articles for other forms of Haiku.

Much Respect-Much Love

Ronovan


 


 

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Join 15,957 other followers

@RonovanWrites

 © Copyright-All rights reserved by ronovanwrites.wordpress.com 2016

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Posted in Blogging

18 Gmail settings that will change how you think about your inbox

Just a link to a great article for those of you that have a gmail account. Even how to increase the undo send number of seconds you have to 30 instead of 5.

https://www.fastcompany.com/40583060/18-gmail-settings-that-will-change-how-you-think-about-your-inbox

Posted in Haiku Prompt Challenge

RonovanWrites #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge #205 Tyrant&Hope

Remember to come back and visit the comments section during the week for your fellow poets entries!

Haiku Poetry Prompt Writing Challenge Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Tyrant, Hope.
HowManySyllables.com
Thesaurus.com

 

Ronovan Writes Haiku Challenge Image 2016

The Guidelines are simple.

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like. The link above has links within it to articles about how to write Haibun, Tanka, and even a new form I created called Freku. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you likeinstead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help visit HowManySyllables.com. (You would be surprised at how many syllables some words actually have.)
  2. The two words can be used as you like. Words have different definitions and you can use the definitions you like. You can even use a synonym word as long as it does not change the meaning. Go to Thesaurus.com for Synonym help.
  3. Use the Tag of Ronovan Writes Haiku Challenge. This will help me find you in case you forget to ping back or leave your URL in the comments.
  4. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL  in a comment so we can all go and visit your site to see what you have done. You can do a ping back. What’s a ping back? Put the URL link in the address bar of this post, if you like, within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenges out, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing by more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running I get paid for by your visit. Click HERE for a detailed article on Ping Backs.
  5. You may copy one of the badges/images appearing in this post below or above and place it on your site if you wish, most normally use it within their post. I am not saying you need to, but if you would like to do so then go ahead. It is simply my way of saying thank you for participating. I sometimes make custom images for the week, if time and health permits.
  6. The Challenge currently BEGINS at 8 AM EST (New York City time) on Mondays. And a DEADLINE is Noon EST (New York City time) on the Sunday following the Challenge Post release.


The Challenge Words!

Tyrant&Hope

Not sure how to write a Haiku? Click HERE for a quick How to write Haiku Poem in English Form with links to articles for other forms of Haiku.

Much Respect-Much Love

Ronovan


 


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 15,957 other followers

@RonovanWrites

 © Copyright-All rights reserved by ronovanwrites.wordpress.com 2016

Posted in Poetry

The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost- A video presentation.

“Most readers consider “The Road Not Taken” to be a paean to triumphant self-assertion (“I took the one less traveled by”), but the literal meaning of the poem’s own lines seems completely at odds with this interpretation. The poem’s speaker tells us he “shall be telling,” at some point in the future, of how he took the road less traveled by, yet he has already admitted that the two paths “equally lay / In leaves” and “the passing there / Had worn them really about the same.” So the road he will later call less traveled is actually the road equally traveled. The two roads are interchangeable.

According to this reading, then, the speaker will be claiming “ages and ages hence” that his decision made “all the difference” only because this is the kind of claim we make when we want to comfort or blame ourselves by assuming that our current position is the product of our own choices (as opposed to what was chosen for us or allotted to us by chance). The poem isn’t a salute to can-do individualism; it’s a commentary on the self-deception we practice when constructing the story of our own lives. “The Road Not Taken” may be, as the critic Frank Lentricchia memorably put it, “the best example in all of American poetry of a wolf in sheep’s clothing.” But we could go further: It may be the best example in all of American culture of a wolf in sheep’s clothing.” From the article The Most Misread Poem in America by David Orr in the Paris Review.

Posted in Inspiration & Motivation

Why diversity and inclusion aren’t about race but everyone thinks they are | Michael Bush

A great listen!