Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 410 KING and Queen.

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

KING

Queen

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.


 


 

An updated How to Write Haiku in English. that has just a little more detail and for knowledge and perhaps craft. And how to do a Pingback.

 

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


 

Haiku Challenge

The Nature of Things – a poem

The Nature of Things

the wild … what’s a king

when a queen is everything

what else is needed

 

This is my entry for this weeks Haiku Poetry Challenge of KING and Queen.

There are details in the prompt on how to write a Haiku.

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© 2014-2022-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

If Only – a poem

If Only

To know then what I know now… what a difference it could have made.

The mistakes, the miss takes, the timid moments and the terrible.

What would today be if those long ago days had been golden.?

This is my entry for this weeks Sijo Poetry Challenge with theme/inspiration of HIGH SCHOOL.

There are details in the prompt on how to write a Sijo, a syllable based poetry form similar to a haiku but originating in Korea.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

© 2014-2022-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #9. Use HIGH SCHOOL as your inspiration this week.

Graduations are beginning around the country. This week think back on either your High School days or perhaps your own children and their experiences. Remember a Sijo is an opportunity to be contemplative.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

The Winding Road – a poem

The Winding Road

peace… in open space

empty of straight lines to stray

the nature of man

 

This is my entry for this weeks Haiku Poetry Challenge of NATURE and Space.

There are details in the prompt on how to write a Haiku.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

© 2014-2022-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 409 NATURE and Space.

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

NATURE

Space

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.



An updated How to Write Haiku in English. that has just a little more detail and for knowledge and perhaps craft. And how to do a Pingback.

 

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.

Haiku Challenge

The Bright Side.

The Bright Side

In times of good
and in times of bad…
the good wish they would
while the bad wish they had.

Going from thought to thought,
and from one extreme to the other,
there are dreams that you sought
and dreams that you smother.

The key to living is not the path you take,
nor the path you traveled,
it’s the things you forsake
while your world is unraveled.

Remember this while you smile away…
when you arise each morning… call it a great day.

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© 2014-2022-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Why my poetry reads like it does.

Art imitates life. Well, usually that’s the other way around but for me and this blog… So, I thought I would give everyone a little bit of an explanation about how weird some of my poetry is lately. If you’ve been following the blog long enough you know that I pretty much write what’s going on, for the most part. Sometimes it could just be inspired by a song or the beat of a song. Lately it’s about life.

One thing I love about haiku is that with so few words you can have so many meanings. For me, the meaning of my poetry is pretty simple, but when I read them again I can see how they can be interpreted them other ways. I mean I like writing a poem that is so clear to me but can be something else to others and completely opposite to anything I thought of at first.

Life is crazy at the moment for me. I am having to exist to keep my mother eating and moving and living while at the same time trying to do the same for me who has been isolated from the world for almost nine years. I drive now, for the first time in that long. I do everything. Not complaining, although I really am complaining but I can because I know all of the stuff.

So, I say all of that to explain that my poetry starts out to be a positive and moving forward thing but may end up sounding a little negative. It’s just word selection and how I use those words. I like to throw a twist in there.

Expect some attempts at funny and randomness. I loved writing that way back when I started the blog. Expect some poetry that reads like songs. I can hear the beat even if you can’t, although I try to write the words in such a way that you might figure it out.

Keep reading!

 

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© 2014-2022-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #8. Use REBIRTH OR CHANGE as your inspiration this week.

 

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Wave Goodbye to Hello? – a poem

Wave Goodbye to Hello?

peaks fail… crash below

to bring power to release…

ride ebbs to their flows

 

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© 2014-2022-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Turning – a poem

Turning

the leaf waves goodbye,

carrying away the old,

new pages bring hope

 

This is my entry for this weeks Haiku Poetry Challenge of LEAF and Tote.

There are details in the prompt on how to write a Haiku.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

© 2014-2022-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 408 LEAF and Tote.

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

LEAF

Tote

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.



An updated How to Write Haiku in English. that has just a little more detail and for knowledge and perhaps craft. And how to do a Pingback.

 

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.

Haiku Challenge

What Now? – a poem

What Now?

The ideal, the divine, the wish, the want … for some out of reach.

Once reached, life is forever changed …  in danger of collapse.

Where once was elation and clarity … the future now void and vague.

 

This is my entry for this weeks Sijo Poetry Challenge with theme/inspiration of PERFECTION.

There are details in the prompt on how to write a Sijo, a syllable based poetry form similar to a haiku but originating in Korea.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

© 2014-2022-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #7. Use PERFECTION as your inspiration this week.

Perfection’s meaning has changed over time for me. Is it because of what I want, where I am, what I’ve given up on, or all of them?

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

GRACE

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Reality – a poem

Reality

a frozen tundra,

the heart of a broken soul

the truth’s final path

 

This is my entry for this weeks Haiku Poetry Challenge of DESERT and Path.

There are details in the prompt on how to write a Haiku.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

© 2014-2022-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 407 DESERT and Path.

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

DESERT

Path

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.



An updated How to Write Haiku in English. that has just a little more detail and for knowledge and perhaps craft. And how to do a Pingback.

 

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.

Haiku Challenge

Nonetheless – a poem

Nonetheless

Defined by the moment… raised high beyond life’s normal plane.

The delicate arc of form… revealing celestial gifts.

Thankful misery in this… given to an unworthy beast.

 

This is my entry for this weeks Sijo Poetry Challenge with theme/inspiration of GRACE.

There are details in the prompt on how to write a Sijo, a syllable based poetry form similar to a haiku but originating in Korea.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

© 2014-2022-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #6. Use GRACE as your inspiration this week.

The word grace has proven to have many different meanings as I’ve grown older. I’m not sure where people’s minds will go in that first moment of reading the word, but with me it’s almost as though all of the important moments come in one flash. Audrey Hepburn is one of those moments.

Thesaurus.com

GRACE

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Midnight Ride – a poem

Moonlight Ride

rings upon water,

air roused as the dragon flies

… zipping here and there

 

This is my entry for this weeks Haiku Poetry Challenge of FLY and Zip.

There are details in the prompt on how to write a Haiku.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

© 2014-2022-  Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 406 FLY and Zip.

 

Yes, I mean Bare not bear.

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

FLY

Zip

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.



An updated How to Write Haiku in English. that has just a little more detail and for knowledge and perhaps craft. And how to do a Pingback.

 

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.

Haiku Challenge