Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 447 BUBBLING and Creek.

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

BUBBLING

Creek

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.


 

How to Write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


 

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Haiku Challenge

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Ronovan Writes SIJO Wednesday Poetry Challenge #46. Use FORTUNE as your inspiration this week.

Friends and acquaintances are the surest passport to fortune. – Arthur Schopenhauer

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 446 CHIRP and Hello.

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

CHIRP

Hello

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.


 

How to Write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


 

 

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Haiku Challenge

Ronovan Writes SIJO Wednesday Poetry Challenge #45. Use EMBRACE as your inspiration this week.

Embrace of a loved one. Embracing a situation. Longing for an embrace. Missing a familiar embrace. When I picked the word, as I do with most, I do so for one reason and by the time I get to this point I begin to think of the other possibilities the word can bring about. And I’m sure there are a lot more.

Our task must be to free ourselves by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature and its beauty. – Albert Einstein

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 445 FREE and Last.

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

FREE

Last

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.


How to Write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


 

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Haiku Challenge

Ronovan Writes SIJO Wednesday Poetry Challenge #44. Use OVERCOME as your inspiration this week.

There’s a lot of things we can overcome. Emotional, physical, professional, and probably a lot more I’m just not thinking of in this moment. Sometimes it takes longer than we would like to get there, but we keep trying. I have a few things I’m working on. Maybe it’s having so many that makes it that much more difficult to overcome just one.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 444 DOG and Frog.

Some of you probably aren’t fans of College Football here in the US. Football as in American Football. Today is our national championship game and my alma mater is one of the teams, The University of Georgia Bulldogs, they won last year. Their opponents are the surprise team of the year who has one heck of a quarterback, basically they guy who captains the team to score. That team is the TCU Horned Frogs. Our quarterback has been an inspiring story and if we can win this game, no doubt there will one day be a movie about him. No one thought he could make it as a starter for the DAWGS, but he proved them wrong. In a BIG way.

 

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

DOG

Frog

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.


 

How to Write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


 

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Haiku Challenge

Ronovan Writes PROMISE Wednesday Poetry Challenge #43. Use PROMISE as your inspiration this week.

It”s that week. The promise week. You promise yourself you’ll do this or that over the next year. Or maybe you promise someone else or you just plain promised at some point in your life. Did you keep it? Do you prepare to keep promises? Did you break one that ended up being the worst mistake of your life?

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 443 BREAK and Mend.

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

BREAK

Mend

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.


How to Write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Haiku Challenge

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #42. Use RECOVER as your inspiration this week.

I’ve had to recover from many things, both physical and otherwise. I think the otherwise has been more difficult.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 442 DONE and Tire.

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

DONE

Tire

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.


 

How to Write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


 

 

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Haiku Challenge

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #41. Use GIFT as your inspiration this week.

You had to know it would come up sometime this month. Gifts. What’s your favorite, either you were given or you gave? Is there a gift you always wanted but never got? Does a gift need to be a material thing? Or is the gift you might think about sharing with us about a talent you have, like are you a gifted chainsaw juggler?

 

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 441 GLOW and Night.

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

GLOW

Night

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.


How to Write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


 

 

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Haiku Challenge

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #40. Use TRIP as your inspiration this week.

Trips are coming. Well, they might be for some with the holidays. Personally, a trip to me means the beach. I can’t swim. I’m allergic to the heat and sun. But if I could, I would have a home on the beach for the rest of my life.

But I’ve also been tripped up many times in my life. Plans, big plans, suddenly disappear. You flounder for a while, maybe even longer than a while. It’s hard to get started back up again after tripping that way. It’s like all the energy and meaning has been pulled out of your body. But eventually you figure it out.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 440 CROWN and Drop.

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

CROWN

Drop

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.


 

 

 

 

How to Write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


 

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Haiku Challenge

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #39. Use QUOTE as your inspiration this week.

There are quotes that inspire people. What’s one that’s done so for you? And how have you used it? My quotes are usually from scripture.

He says, “Be still, and know that I am God;…”

This is one of my favorites because it tells me that there are things I don’t and can’t know. And that sometimes you just have to be still, be quiet. Rest. And then things may come to you and be clear. Busy and havoc filled minds can be dangerous minds because they make bad decisions.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 439 CLEAR and Rest.

You have to clear a lot to rest a lot, but then… you need to rest a lot to able to clear a lot. (Sounded fine when it came out of the fingers.)

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

CLEAR

Rest

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.


 

 

 

How to Write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


 

 

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Haiku Challenge

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #38. Use REVEAL as your inspiration this week.

What was your big reveal or maybe something was revealed to you? Good? Bad?

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 438 FABLE and Fire.

Useful Links for Synonyms at Thesaurus.com:

FABLE

Fire

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.


 

 

How to Write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English (the link shows you how) as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help,
    • For syllables for each word, and different definitions, you use the definition that works for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
      • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


 

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Haiku Challenge

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #37. Use THANKFUL as your inspiration this week.

It’s that time of the year here in the US of A. Thankful. What are you thankful for? Me? It’s a difficult thing to determine. It’s been a pretty bad year and a half. But I suppose I’m still alive which means things are still possible.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.