Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #38. Use REVEAL as your inspiration this week.

What was your big reveal or maybe something was revealed to you? Good? Bad?

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #37. Use THANKFUL as your inspiration this week.

It’s that time of the year here in the US of A. Thankful. What are you thankful for? Me? It’s a difficult thing to determine. It’s been a pretty bad year and a half. But I suppose I’m still alive which means things are still possible.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #36. Use FREE as your inspiration this week.

Are you Free? At first I was going to say something about this doesn’t mean price, but maybe it does… for some. Sometimes you’re locked in a situation. But can you be free in that moment?  Ever been about 15 minutes away from your dreams being one step closer to realization then snatched away? How about someone else cuts ties with you and they’re free but you’re still locked into that relationship. Those feelings.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #35. Use COPE as your inspiration this week.

Coping. Is coping a positive thing or a treading water thing? I only just now wondered that. I suppose it depends on what’s being coped.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #34. Use DANCE as your inspiration this week.

Dancing. In the US there is a tradition about this time of year called the Homecoming Dance. It’s a point during the high school football season (American Football) where alumni of the school come back to watch the game, see each other again, and the school tries to make sure they schedule a team they know they can defeat. Who wants to lose on their Homecoming Night?

The Homecoming Dance is a big deal for the students. It’s often the first time a guy wears a tuxedo and the girls wear a ball gown. Or at least a special gown they’ll likely only wear once. The guy rents his tux. The boy can hopefully pick the girl up in his car, give her flowers, be intimidated by the father, or possibly by the glare of a mother. The father tells the boy that whatever he does to his daughter, the father will do to him. Anything. The daughter is embarrassed and the fun begins.

I never went to a homecoming dance. I always seemed to be at a new school for a bit then moved back to what I still call my school. My father’s work had us moving a bit. He was a very talented man. I think it hurt me in many ways but overall I had opportunities and experiences I think my old classmates probably didn’t. It was a county school, many not close to a city, while all the other schools I went to were in major populace areas, such as a part of Greater Atlanta, and a University town. Both were the first time I met people of so many different cultural backgrounds.

The only dance I ever went to was a prom in my 11th year of school. I danced one dance. No date. The part I enjoyed most was helping decorate the venue for the dance.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #33. Use WINNING as your inspiration this week.

Winning is something I’ve had to find through the years. I’m not a huge competitor… well there was that one time I shredded the skin on my shin and knee sliding into home plate in a pair of shorts during a softball game.

But winning can be overcoming a misstep in life. For me it was coming back from my concussion and memory loss to become someone that survives without needing the old memories to be a productive person.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #32. Use MAZE as your inspiration this week.

Maze has a lot of meanings in life. It’s how we end up at the next stage in life. How we navigate relationships, and in the autumn here in the US… you try to find your way through a maze cut out of a big corn field. Yep, we used acres of food as entertainment.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #31. Use FESTIVAL as your inspiration this week.

Here in the US it’s that month where Halloween takes over. Well, that and Christmas decorations and commercials.

But there are many holidays and festivals throughout the year. What holiday stands out for you? What does it mean?

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #30. Use MOVIES as your inspiration this week.

This past Friday Hocus Pocus 2 came out on Disney +. For some it was the event of the year with costume parties with 3 generations dressing up as the 3 sisters. Movies have a huge impact on our lives. They are key to that memory of our teen years, or at least for me. I still may not have all of my memories back from my life but I do get those feelings of nostalgia from movies, music, and various sensory stimuli. What movies have that big impact on you and what do they do for you? Do they help you get through a tough time now as an adult? Are they an escape?

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #29. Use AUTUMN as your inspiration this week.

I know it’s not Autumn or Fall in every part of the world, but the Sijo Poetry Challenge isn’t about a specific place. It’s about memories and talking through the images the prompts bring to mind. For me Autumn is about high school and football games. Football is big here in the Southern part of the US. Not the soccer football but the football Americans play by using their hands. Yeah, I know. But people in Ohio are rather unique Americans.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #28. Use BALANCE as your inspiration this week.

One of the difficult things in life to achieve, balance. But is it really balance people want? I suppose to each person the word has its own meaning. Do we want our lives to be balanced with good and evil? Do all people even agree on what is good and evil or in fact is there evil at all? Or good? Is balance more of the idea how we measure out our daily lives in order to survive, to survive happily, financially happy? Is it more a love thing vs all else? As I’m writing I’m considering all of the possibilities that might be included in ones balance. It’s whirlwind of a seesaw.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #27. Use SOAR as your inspiration this week.

A strange word this week? Maybe. But imagine how your life has soared at some point. Even I have not had all low points. But of course with so many lows, things don’t need to rise to high to be considered soaring. Am I right? I find the problem is the drops after the soaring that is the problem. Even knowing the drop is going to come doesn’t seem to make it any easier to handle.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #26. Use PERSISTENCE as your inspiration this week.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #25. Use INSPIRATION as your inspiration this week.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #24. Use ADVERSITY as your inspiration this week.

Adversity is constant. It may change its face, but it’s always present. Recently the thumb drive holding over 20 years worth of book ideas and first drafts went missing… and is still missing. It’s almost enough to make a person give up. This bit of adversity may seem trivial to some, and in some ways it is very trivial, but to me writing is a well for my sanity. Each idea and draft says something about where I was mentally at that moment in time. If you’ve followed here long enough you know about the other aspects of adversity I’ve faced. For me it seems loss is my ever changing faced Adversity.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #23. Use ADVICE as your inspiration this week.

I’ve been given it and I’ve given it. I’ve taken it and I’ve not. But I’ve still listened each time and do learn. Even bad advice can do good… just by knowing who that advice is from, you might find out it’s good advice by how they’ve turned out.

So I guess I’m saying all advice is good, as long as you’re smart enough to know how to get the good out of it.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #22. Use ACHIEVEMENT as your inspiration this week.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #21. Use GOALS as your inspiration this week.

Goals. We’ve all got them even if we don’t realize it. I have many but that motivation to achieve can be a problem. Even my son has some and he’s definitely got the ambition. He’s been planning a degree in Mechanical Engineering since he was 6th Grade.

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #20. Use PRIDE as your inspiration this week.

I’ve been thinking about what pride means and how pride has impacted my life. Has it been good or bad? Is it a good thing or a bad thing? Healthy? Not? Does it all depend? How has PRIDE been part of your life?

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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Ronovan Writes Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge #19. Use DREAMS as your inspiration this week.

We’ve all had them. The dreams for the future and even those we have when we’re asleep. So I may not be referring to the sleep kind here. Have any of your dreams come true? Have they not? Do you still have them? What are you doing to make them come true?

Thesaurus.com

Merriam-Webster.com

Use the above link to discover the various interpretations of the word of the week. Don’t limit yourself to the first one that comes to mind. Expand your thinking.


A new form of poetry for us to try. Yes, the Décima Challenge has come to an end after 100 weeks.

Now we have the Sijo, a Korean form believed to have first been used in the fourteenth century. It is similar in structure to various Japanese forms such as Haiku. As with many forms of poetry, the Sijo became a preferred poetry form of the yangban or ruling class as well as royalty. They were written in Chinese and were originally short songs set to music. The focus of the Sijo is usually nature and contemplation. We’ll try that to begin with.

You should use the word in the title of this post as your inspiration as either a theme of the Sijo or in the poem itself.

There are:

  • Three Lines
  • 14-16 syllables per line
  • A total of 44-46 syllables for the entire poem.

To know how many syllables in a particular word try HowManySyllables.com.

  • The first line of the Sijo usually sets the theme.
  • The second line elaborates on the first line.
  • The third line brings the poem matter to a close.

The setting can be nature, a favorite season, or some event of your day. Something, as I mentioned above that can be contemplative in nature.

Within each of the three lines there is usually a pause. You can hear it in the example below. The bold sections are the parts after the pause, or at least as I read/hear them. Reading your Sijo out loud will help with using the correct form.

The following example is considered the oldest Sijo in existence,

The spring breeze melted snow on the hills then quickly disappeared.
I wish I could borrow it briefly to blow over my hair
And melt away the aging frost forming now about my ears.

If I’m counting right there are 15 syllables per line. I think that would be a good target but the pattern is up to you, as per the generally held thoughts on the matter.

 

As with all of the challenges that have been hosted here be sure to;

  1. Copy and past your URL into the comments below so other poets can visit and read your
  2. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.
  3. Reblogging is great as well.

Ronovan Writes Sijo Challenge Image

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