Ranee of Atlantis

Ranee of Atlantis

The vault revealed empty, clarion calls sound,

Ranee slips through shadows, each entrapment found.

 

Fiends unfurl and fly, Deceiver’s crown gone?

What will Ranee do, once set upon?

 

Through streets of Ubar, through dwellings past,

she passes the poor, so many…vast.

 

The demons fly in, stones rain down,

Ranee the rightful queen, wears the crown.



There are a number of words used this time with many meanings. Your interpretation could make the story of the poem be several things, although mostly the same, just with your own imagery and flair to it. Ubar is one of the names of a legendary lost city in the southern Arabian sands, claimed to have been destroyed by a natural disaster or as a punishment by God. The fictional name for it is Atlantis of the Sands.


This poem was created in response to the Weekend Writing Prompt by Sammi Cox of sammiscribbles blog. As you can see it was to use the word ‘Vault’ and be 56 words.

Weekend Writing Prompt 180 Vault badge. Black text on white background.

Sammi’s challenge as well as other blogger’s challenges/prompts links are collected on the page at the top of this blog Challenges/Prompts from the Blogosphere.


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© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

How to Write a Vocabularicon Poem.

This is replacing the previous post due to inappropriate spam I would rather not deal with. Don’t ask.

There are two ways you could do the Vocabularicon.

#1

A few months ago, after I started the Décima Poetry Challenge, I was wanted to create something of my own, as I tend to do. A 10 line poem with 10 syllables per line. It was inspired by a poet named Vocabularical and his participation in the challenge. He was a cool guy, with awesome ideas, and a way with words. I mean, if you’re going to give yourself a name like Vocabularical…you better be good. I decided to name my new poetry form, a Vocabularicon. If you think about it, you definitely will need to use great vocabulary.

#2

What gave rise to a second manner of doing the poem was when I participated in MMA Storyline’s 100 Word Flash Fiction Challenge. I thought this challenge is perfect for trying out my new style for the very first time. So, I wrote 10 lines, 10 words per line, with only 10 syllables per line. Yes, that means only one syllable per word. Your word choice is even more vital here than in other poems. Other than perhaps a Haiku, especially the 3/5/3 version, that’s syllables, not necessarily words or even the non-existent 1/2/1 I’ve tried**.

The quick and dirty instructions: (links are to LiteraryDevices.net)

Number One

  • 10 LINES/verses
  • 10 SYLLABLES PER LINE.
  • DIVIDED INTO 5 Couplets See the example below.
  • With Couplets, meter is important. “Essentially, meter is the basic rhythmic structure of a line within a poem or poetic work. Meter functions as a means of imposing a specific number of syllables and emphasis when it comes to a line of poetry that adds to its musicality.”-LiteraryDevices.net
  • “The literary device “foot” is a measuring unit in poetry, which is made up of stressed and unstressed syllables… The combination of feet creates meter in poetry. Later, these meters are joined for the composition of a complete poem. Therefore, a foot is the formative unit of the meter.”

Number Two

  • 10 LINES/verses
  • 10 ONE-SYLLABLE WORDS PER LINE.
  • DIVIDED INTO 5 Couplets See the example below.
  • With Couplets, meter is important. “Essentially, meter is the basic rhythmic structure of a line within a poem or poetic work. Meter functions as a means of imposing a specific number of syllables and emphasis when it comes to a line of poetry that adds to its musicality.”-LiteraryDevices.net
  • “The literary device “foot” is a measuring unit in poetry, which is made up of stressed and unstressed syllables… The combination of feet creates meter in poetry. Later, these meters are joined for the composition of a complete poem. Therefore, a foot is the formative unit of the meter.”

IF YOU WOULD LIKE, YOU COULD GROUP THE VERSES TOGETHER TO FORM A GEOMETRIC BLOCK. THAT WOULD BE KIND OF NEAT TO ACHIEVE.

  • Think about it, if you can get the exact same number of letters per line, keeping to the other guidelines mentioned, that would be a nice accomplishment.

Below is an example of the 10×10/Vocabularicon.

 

Daddy’s Baby Boy

They sneak at night, to pick their mid, fall  gourd,

But they know not,  they have crossed the Dark Lord.

 

The clouds do glow, to buy the fools some time,

and lead the way, clear of his broods’ wet grime.

 

They come each year, to choose for their blithe signs.

and with plans made, hunt one with thick lush vines

 

Once they find him, his life’s line is cut short,

pray what comes next, you’ve heard tell of a sort

 

The Dark Lord comes, his rage steams up the night,

It’s All Saint’s Eve, and Dad’s set for a fright.


Most of us self-taught poets have used poetic meter and feet for the entirety of our poetic lives. Meter, for this poem, is the shared length of the verses and the rhyme pattern. The feet are either stressed or unstressed words. Stressed is when you go up on the word or syllable. Since this poetry form is restricted to one-syllable words, you stress a word. For this poem  I’ve made the first part of each verse four words long, and the second six. As you read you quickly pick up both the feet and meter patterns with ease. Or so I hope. But, for each person their might the opposite feet emphasis than another person reading it. Also, feet are not as simple as four words here and six words there, you should also listen to how your words are working together to accomplish a natural rhythm and not one that’s hunted for. As I’ve been working with these types of poems, I’ve been trying to do better with meter and feet, but still have a long way to go. But…I keep writing.


**My How To Write A Haiku Poem In English Form post has been updated with some added information.

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© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Daddy’s Baby Boy – a 10×10/Vocabularicon poem

Daddy’s Baby Boy

 

They sneak at night, to pick their mid, fall  gourd,

But they know not,  they have crossed the Dark Lord.

bikurgurl photo all rights reserved pumpkin farm at night

 

The clouds do glow,

to buy the fools some time,

and lead the way,

clear of his broods’ wet grime.

Image by Bikurgurl

They come each year, to choose for their blithe signs,

and with plans made, hunt one with thick lush vines.

 

Once he is found, his life’s line is cut short,

pray what comes next, you’ve heard tell of a sort.

 

The Dark Lord comes, his rage steams up the night,

It’s All Saint’s Eve, and Dad’s set for a fright.


I used this form of poetry for my last poem, Fuel, for the first time, also written for one of our very own poet community members., MMA Storytime’s challenges. I’ve had the idea for this style for a while, haven’t been able to find it out there anywhere so far. I call it the 10×10, meaning 10 lines with 10 one-syllable words each. You see the structure above if you’d like to try it.

This 10×10/Vocabularicon poem has been composed in response to bikurgurl’s 100 Word Wednesday image prompt below. (Out on Wednesdays, see the challenge list at top of this blog.)She provides the image, and you write what you like, how you like, with, I’ll say, exactly 100 words. She’s a bit more lenient. As you can see, I used my new style for this one. It just works so well, I couldn’t resist.


 

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© 2020- Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.