Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 17 (PRIZE) This week, it’s the D rhyme line.

That’s right everybody. I went there. I gave you the D rhyme… and with this word of all the words in the world. Don’t hate me because you’ve been challenged. Hate me because I’m beautifully insignificant.

But I really chose the word because it went well with the theme of the challenges this week. You can do a part two of your haiku if you did one, and if you want to go in that direction.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (Eye and Light this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for GROW, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word PRIZE must be one of the D line words. Then the other D line(s) word(s) must rhyme with PRIZE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 16 (GROW) This week, it’s the C rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge that often has prompts (Destruct and Self this week) that share a central theme, at least in my head, with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  1. To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for KIND, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the C rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word GROW must be one of the C line words. Then the other C line(s) word(s) must rhyme with GROW.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 15 (KIND) This week, it’s the B rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge that often has prompts (Chimpanzee&Kiss this week) that share a central theme, at least in my head, with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word KIND must be one of the B line words. Then the other B line(s) word(s) must rhyme with KIND.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 14 (BIRD) This week, it’s the A rhyme line.

This week, I recommend going with a synonym. There aren’t a lot of natural rhymes for BIRD. I used a word generator this week, just to see what happened. I did it with the Haiku Challenge as well. I thought it interesting the three words that came up, under a search for each word alone.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge that often has prompts (Finger&Planet this week) that share a central theme, at least in my head, with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.

For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.

For today’s challenge, the word BIRD must be one of the A line words. Then the other A line(s) word(s) must rhyme with BIRD.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 13 (TRUE) This week, it’s the C rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge that often has prompts (Dwindle&Ripple this week) that share a central theme, at least in my head, with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.

For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.

For today’s challenge, the word TRUE must be one of the C line words. Then the other C line(s) word(s) must rhyme with TRUE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 12 (WIND) This week, it’s the B rhyme line.

A REMINDER. For some of us when we get an idea in our head, we forget everything else. Remember, WIND has two pronunciations that will change what rhymes you could do.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge that often has prompts (Intent&Thought this week) that share a central theme, at least in my head, with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.

For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.

For today’s challenge, the word WIND must be one of the B line words. Then the other B line(s) word(s) must rhyme with WIND.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 11 (STORY). This week, it’s the A or C rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

To read poems so far entered this week, click HERE to go to the comment section.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge that often has prompts (Face&Change this week) that share a central theme, at least in my head, with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.

For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.

For today’s challenge, the word STORY must be one of the A or C line words. Then the other A or C line(s) word(s) must rhyme with STORY.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback, if you don’t already know how.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 10 (SENSE). This week, it’s the D rhyme spot.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem. If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

This week I decided to link the Haiku Challenge Prompt words with the Décima prompt. You don’t have to do so, but if you want to try, all you do is write one of them, and then stay along the same theme when writing the other. Just make sure to put the appropriate link in the appropriate challenge comments. Click HERE to go to the Haiku Challenge for this week.

 

You can now use the

Synonym

of the Prompt Word. This will make for variety and a bit more freedom to fully get your message across.

I’m not doing this just because this week’s Prompt word is a bit difficult. I intend to use it for my Décima. However, this freedom in the Haiku Challenges over the years has produced some great poetry.

 

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines (stanza) of poetry that rhyme but in this case, there is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to.
In addition, each line must only have 8 syllables.
The rhyme pattern is;
a
b
b
a
a
c
c
d
d
c

For this particular challenge, the word SENSE must be one of the D position words. Then the other D position(s) word(s) must rhyme with SENSE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

This week is the 

D rhyme spot.

This week’s inspiration is to use

SENSE

as one of your “D” words, and meaning you use SENSE in one spot, and its rhyme in the other.

If you are having a bit of trouble with this prompt, just write whatever you are inspired to do as long as it is a Décima.

Tools you might need to write the poem are:
RhymeZone.com,
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put a link, Pingback, of this challenge in your post, to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate., but this is not a must to join in.

If you choose to put the link in your post, this is a Ping Back. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback, if you have never done one before. Basically, any time you click on a link in an article or post, that’s a Ping Back.

Please share this post on your Social Media, such as Twitter or FB. As with the pingback, this is not a requirement. Reblogging is great as well.

Some people also like to copy the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 9 (NEXT). This week, it’s the B rhyme spot.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem. If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

IMPORTANT UPDATE/CHANGE to the CHALLENGE!

You can now use the Synonym of the Prompt Word. This will make for variety and a bit more freedom to fully get your message across.

I’m not doing this just because this week’s Prompt word is a bit difficult. I intend to use it for my Décima. However, this freedom in the Haiku Challenges over the years has produced some great poetry.

 

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines (stanza) of poetry that rhyme but in this case, there is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to.
In addition, each line must only have 8 syllables.
The rhyme pattern is;
a
b
b
a
a
c
c
d
d
c

For this particular challenge, the word NEXT must be one of the B position words. Then the other B position(s) word(s) must rhyme with NEXT.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

This week is the 

B rhyme spot.

This week’s inspiration is to use

NEXT

as one of your “B” words, and meaning you use NEXT in one spot, and its rhyme in the other.

If you are having a bit of trouble with this prompt, just write whatever you are inspired to do as long as it is a Décima.

Tools you might need to write the poem are:
RhymeZone.com,
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put a link, Pingback, of this challenge in your post, to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate., but this is not a must to join in.

If you choose to put the link in your post, this is a Ping Back. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback, if you have never done one before. Basically, any time you click on a link in an article or post, that’s a Ping Back.

Please share this post on your Social Media, such as Twitter or FB. As with the pingback, this is not a requirement. Reblogging is great as well.

Some people also like to copy the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 8 (FIRE). This week, it’s the A rhyme spot.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem. If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

This week, try and write another post using the Haiku challenge words, linking the two poems’ meanings together. It’s not a must, just a suggestion to challenge the creativity a bit more.

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines (stanza) of poetry that rhyme but in this case, there is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to.
In addition, each line must only have 8 syllables.
The rhyme pattern is;
a
b
b
a
a
c
c
d
d
c

For this particular challenge, the word FIRE must be one of the A position words. Then the other two A position(s) word(s) must rhyme with FIRE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

This week is the 

A rhyme spot.

This week’s inspiration is to use

FIRE

as one of your “A” words, and meaning you use FIRE in one spot, and its rhyme in the other.

If you are having a bit of trouble with this prompt, just write whatever you are inspired to do as long as it is a Décima.

Tools you might need to write the poem are:
RhymeZone.com,
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put a link, Pingback, of this challenge in your post, to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate., but this is not a must to join in.

If you choose to put the link in your post, this is a Ping Back. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback, if you have never done one before. Basically, any time you click on a link in an article or post, that’s a Ping Back.

Please share this post on your Social Media, such as Twitter or FB. As with the pingback, this is not a requirement. Reblogging is great as well.

Some people also like to copy the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 7 (DREAM). This week, it’s the A rhyme spot.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem. If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

 

 

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines (stanza) of poetry that rhyme but in this case there is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to.
In addition each line must only have 8 syllables.
The rhyme pattern is;
a
b
b
a
a
c
c
d
d
c

For this particular challenge the word DREAM must be one of the A position words. Then the other two A position/s word/s must rhyme with DREAM.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

This week is the 

A rhyme spot.

This week’s inspiration is to use

DREAM

as one of your “A” words, and meaning you use DREAM in one spot, and its rhyme in the other.

If you are having a bit of trouble with this prompt, just write whatever you are inspired to do as long as it is a Décima.

Tools you might need to write the poem are:
RhymeZone.com,
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put a link, Ping Back, of this challenge in your post, to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate., but this is not a must to join in.

If you choose to put the link in your post, this is a Ping Back. Click HERE to find out how to do a Ping Back, if you have never done one before. Basically, any time you click on a link in an article or post, that’s a Ping Back.

Please share this post on your Social Media, such as Twitter or FB. As with the Ping Back, this is not a requirement. Reblogging is great as well.

Some people also like to copy the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 6 (Eye). This week, it’s the B rhyme spot.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem. If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Click the name of my Décima below to see my take on this weeks prompt word for an example. It is the second part of one I wrote last week.

A Foolish Vow

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines (stanza) of poetry that rhyme but in this case there is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to.
In addition each line must only have 8 syllables.
The rhyme pattern is;
a
b
b
a
a
c
c
d
d
c

For this particular challenge the word EYE must be one of the B position words. Then the other two C position words must rhyme with EYE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

This week is the 

B rhyme spot.

This week’s inspiration is to use

EYE

as one of your “B” words, and meaning you use EYE in one spot, and its rhyme in the other.

If you are having a bit of trouble with this prompt, just write whatever you are inspired to do as long as it is a Décima.

Tools you might need to write the poem are:
RhymeZone.com,
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put a link, Ping Back, of this challenge in your post, to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate., but this is not a must to join in.

If you choose to put the link in your post, this is a Ping Back. Click HERE to find out how to do a Ping Back, if you have never done one before. Basically, any time you click on a link in an article or post, that’s a Ping Back.

Please share this post on your Social Media, such as Twitter or FB. As with the Ping Back, this is not a requirement. Reblogging is great as well.

Some people also like to copy the challenge image into their post. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 5 (MATE). This week, it’s the C spot.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem. If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines (stanza) of poetry that rhyme but in this case there is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to.
In addition each line must only have 8 syllables.
The rhyme pattern is;
a
b
b
a
a
c
c
d
d
c

For this particular challenge the word MATE must be one of the C position words. Then the other two C position words must rhyme with MATE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

This week is the 

C rhyme spot.

This week’s inspiration is to use

Mate

as one of your “B” words, and meaning you use Itch in one spot, and its rhyme in the other.

 

If you are having a bit of trouble with this prompt, just write whatever you are inspired to do as long as it is a Décima.

Tools you might need to write the poem are:
RhymeZone.com,
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put a link, Ping Back, of this challenge in your post, to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate., but this is not a must to join in.

If you choose to put the link in your post, this is a Ping Back. Click HERE to find out how to do a Ping Back, if you have never done one before. Basically, any time you click on a link in an article or post, that’s a Ping Back.

Please share this post on your Social Media, such as Twitter or FB. As with the Ping Back, this is not a requirement. Reblogging is great as well.

Some people also like to copy the challenge image into their post. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 305: Conflict&Gypsy

Please come by on Wednesday for the new Décima Poetry Challenge
It launched this past Friday, my blogging anniversary, but I will be posting them on Wednesday’s going forward.

How to write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

Remember to come back and visit the comments section during the week for your fellow poets entries!

Haiku Poetry Prompt Writing Challenge Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Conflict, Gypsy
HowManySyllables.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster Dictionary

The Guidelines are simple.

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like. The link above has links within it to articles about how to write Haibun, Tanka, and even a new form I created called Freku. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help visit HowManySyllables.com. (You would be surprised at how many syllables some words actually have.)
  2. The two words can be used as you like. Words have different definitions and you can use the definitions you like. You can even use a synonym word as long as it does not change the meaning. Go to Thesaurus.com for Synonym help.
  3. Use the Tag of Ronovan Writes Haiku Challenge. This will help me find you in case you forget to ping back or leave your URL in the comments.
  4. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL  in a comment so we can all go and visit your site to see what you have done. You can do a ping back. What’s a ping back? Put the URL link in the address bar of this post, if you like, within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenges out, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing by more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running I get paid for by your visit. Click HERE for a detailed article on Ping Backs.
  5. You may copy one of the badges/images appearing in this post below or above and place it on your site if you wish, most normally use it within their post. I am not saying you need to, but if you would like to do so then go ahead. It is simply my way of saying thank you for participating. I sometimes make custom images for the week, if time and health permits.
  6. The Challenge currently BEGINS at 8 AM EST (New York City time) on Mondays. And a DEADLINE is Noon EST (New York City time) on the Sunday following the Challenge Post release.


The Challenge Words!

Conflict&Gypsy

Not sure how to write a Haiku? Click HERE for a quick How to write Haiku Poem in English Form with links to articles for other forms of Haiku.

Much Respect-Much Love

Ronovan


 


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

@RonovanWrites

 © Copyright-All rights reserved by ronovanwrites.wordpress.com 2020

 

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 4 (Itch). This week, it’s the B spot.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem. If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Here is the quick description of a Décima:
10 lines of poetry
8 syllables per line.
This is a rhyming poem with the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc. Sometimes you break the stanza up in abba/accddc.

This week is the B rhyme spot.

This week’s inspiration is to use

Itch

as one of your “B” words, and meaning you use Itch in one spot, and its rhyme in the other.

 

If you are having a bit of trouble with this prompt, just write whatever you are inspired to do as long as it is a Décima.

Tools you might need to write the poem are:
RhymeZone.com,
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put a link, Ping Back, of this challenge in your post, to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate., but this is not a must to join in.

If you choose to put the link in your post, this is a Ping Back. Click HERE to find out how to do a Ping Back, if you have never done one before. Basically, any time you click on a link in an article or post, that’s a Ping Back.

Please share this post on your Social Media, such as Twitter or FB. As with the Ping Back, this is not a requirement. Reblogging is great as well.

Some people also like to copy the challenge image into their post. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 304: Might&Slight

Please come by on Wednesday for the new Décima Poetry Challenge
It launched this past Friday, my blogging anniversary, but I will be posting them on Wednesday’s going forward.

How to write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

Remember to come back and visit the comments section during the week for your fellow poets entries!

Haiku Poetry Prompt Writing Challenge Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Might, Slight
HowManySyllables.com
Thesaurus.com

Iso

The Guidelines are simple.

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like. The link above has links within it to articles about how to write Haibun, Tanka, and even a new form I created called Freku. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help visit HowManySyllables.com. (You would be surprised at how many syllables some words actually have.)
  2. The two words can be used as you like. Words have different definitions and you can use the definitions you like. You can even use a synonym word as long as it does not change the meaning. Go to Thesaurus.com for Synonym help.
  3. Use the Tag of Ronovan Writes Haiku Challenge. This will help me find you in case you forget to ping back or leave your URL in the comments.
  4. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL  in a comment so we can all go and visit your site to see what you have done. You can do a ping back. What’s a ping back? Put the URL link in the address bar of this post, if you like, within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenges out, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing by more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running I get paid for by your visit. Click HERE for a detailed article on Ping Backs.
  5. You may copy one of the badges/images appearing in this post below or above and place it on your site if you wish, most normally use it within their post. I am not saying you need to, but if you would like to do so then go ahead. It is simply my way of saying thank you for participating. I sometimes make custom images for the week, if time and health permits.
  6. The Challenge currently BEGINS at 8 AM EST (New York City time) on Mondays. And a DEADLINE is Noon EST (New York City time) on the Sunday following the Challenge Post release.


The Challenge Words!

Might&Slight

Not sure how to write a Haiku? Click HERE for a quick How to write Haiku Poem in English Form with links to articles for other forms of Haiku.

Much Respect-Much Love

Ronovan


 


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

@RonovanWrites

 © Copyright-All rights reserved by ronovanwrites.wordpress.com 2020

 

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 3 MAD.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem. If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Here is the quick description of a Décima:
10 lines of poetry
8 syllables per line.
This is a rhyming poem with the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc. Sometimes you break the stanza up in abba/accddc.

This week’s inspiration is to use

Mad

as one of your “A” words, and meaning all “A” words must rhyme with MAD.

 

If you are having a bit of trouble with this prompt, just write whatever you are inspired to do as long as it is a Décima.

Tools you might need to write the poem are:
RhymeZone.com,
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put a link, Ping Back, of this challenge in your post, to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate., but this is not a must to join in.

If you choose to put the link in your post, this is a Ping Back. Click HERE to find out how to do a Ping Back, if you have never done one before. Basically, any time you click on a link in an article or post, that’s a Ping Back.

Please share this post on your Social Media, such as Twitter or FB. As with the Ping Back, this is not a requirement. Reblogging is great as well.

Some people also like to copy the challenge image into their post. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 303: Stick&Trick

Please come by on Wednesday for the new Décima Poetry Challenge
It launched this past Friday, my blogging anniversary, but I will be posting them on Wednesday’s going forward.

How to write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

Remember to come back and visit the comments section during the week for your fellow poets entries!

Haiku Poetry Prompt Writing Challenge Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Stick, Trick
HowManySyllables.com
Thesaurus.com

Iso

The Guidelines are simple.

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like. The link above has links within it to articles about how to write Haibun, Tanka, and even a new form I created called Freku. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help visit HowManySyllables.com. (You would be surprised at how many syllables some words actually have.)
  2. The two words can be used as you like. Words have different definitions and you can use the definitions you like. You can even use a synonym word as long as it does not change the meaning. Go to Thesaurus.com for Synonym help.
  3. Use the Tag of Ronovan Writes Haiku Challenge. This will help me find you in case you forget to ping back or leave your URL in the comments.
  4. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL  in a comment so we can all go and visit your site to see what you have done. You can do a ping back. What’s a ping back? Put the URL link in the address bar of this post, if you like, within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenges out, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing by more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running I get paid for by your visit. Click HERE for a detailed article on Ping Backs.
  5. You may copy one of the badges/images appearing in this post below or above and place it on your site if you wish, most normally use it within their post. I am not saying you need to, but if you would like to do so then go ahead. It is simply my way of saying thank you for participating. I sometimes make custom images for the week, if time and health permits.
  6. The Challenge currently BEGINS at 8 AM EST (New York City time) on Mondays. And a DEADLINE is Noon EST (New York City time) on the Sunday following the Challenge Post release.


The Challenge Words!

Stick&Trick

Not sure how to write a Haiku? Click HERE for a quick How to write Haiku Poem in English Form with links to articles for other forms of Haiku.

Much Respect-Much Love

Ronovan


 


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

@RonovanWrites

 © Copyright-All rights reserved by ronovanwrites.wordpress.com 2020

 

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 2 (Hope)

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem. If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Here is the quick description of a Décima:
10 lines of poetry
8 syllables per line.
This is a rhyming poem with the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc. Sometimes you break the stanza up in abba/accddc.

This week’s inspiration is to use

Hope

as one of your “A” words, meaning all “A” words must rhyme with HOPE.

 

If you are having a bit of trouble with this prompt, just write whatever you are inspired to do as long as it is a Décima.

Tools you might need to write the poem are:
RhymeZone.com,
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put a link, Ping Back, of this challenge in your post, to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate., but this is not a must to join in.

If you choose to put the link in your post, this is a Ping Back. Click HERE to find out how to do a Ping Back, if you have never done one before. Basically, any time you click on a link in an article or post, that’s a Ping Back.

Please share this post on your Social Media, such as Twitter or FB. As with the Ping Back, this is not a requirement. Reblogging is great as well.

Some people also like to copy the challenge image into their post. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge CCCII: Bat&Cat

Please come by on Wednesday for the new Décima Poetry Challenge
It launched this past Friday, my blogging anniversary, but I will be posting them on Wednesday’s going forward.

How to write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

Remember to come back and visit the comments section during the week for your fellow poets entries!

Haiku Poetry Prompt Writing Challenge Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Bat, Cat
HowManySyllables.com
Thesaurus.com

Iso

The Guidelines are simple.

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like. The link above has links within it to articles about how to write Haibun, Tanka, and even a new form I created called Freku. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help visit HowManySyllables.com. (You would be surprised at how many syllables some words actually have.)
  2. The two words can be used as you like. Words have different definitions and you can use the definitions you like. You can even use a synonym word as long as it does not change the meaning. Go to Thesaurus.com for Synonym help.
  3. Use the Tag of Ronovan Writes Haiku Challenge. This will help me find you in case you forget to ping back or leave your URL in the comments.
  4. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL  in a comment so we can all go and visit your site to see what you have done. You can do a ping back. What’s a ping back? Put the URL link in the address bar of this post, if you like, within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenges out, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing by more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running I get paid for by your visit. Click HERE for a detailed article on Ping Backs.
  5. You may copy one of the badges/images appearing in this post below or above and place it on your site if you wish, most normally use it within their post. I am not saying you need to, but if you would like to do so then go ahead. It is simply my way of saying thank you for participating. I sometimes make custom images for the week, if time and health permits.
  6. The Challenge currently BEGINS at 8 AM EST (New York City time) on Mondays. And a DEADLINE is Noon EST (New York City time) on the Sunday following the Challenge Post release.


The Challenge Words!

Bat&Cat

Not sure how to write a Haiku? Click HERE for a quick How to write Haiku Poem in English Form with links to articles for other forms of Haiku.

Much Respect-Much Love

Ronovan


 


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

@RonovanWrites

 © Copyright-All rights reserved by ronovanwrites.wordpress.com 2016