Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 24 (LOOK) This week, it’s the C rhyme line.

I chose the word LOOK this week to help those who might want to combine it with their haiku for Monday’s Haiku Challenge prompt of (FURY & SLOW).

The 2 CHALLENGES are SEPARATE but CAN BE combined if YOU CHOOSE to do so.

As you may know, if you did write a haiku you can:

  • Take your haiku and carry its theme into your Décima poem.

  • It can either support the haiku, enhance it through the opportunity of more lines, or completely turn the theme on its head and write an argument against the haiku message, which is kind of what a Décima is for.

  • If you wrote a true nature haiku, you could flip its message into one about humans and the man-made world around us, such as politics, society, and even love. Yes, love is a man-made thing. At least among the humans. I suppose it could be a penguin-made thing among the penguins.

  • My haiku had a little bit of intensity in it due to the sadness of this past Friday and the passing of a true legend and a hero to many.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompt words (FURY & SLOW this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for FALL, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc with a choice of a break between line 4 and 5, then being abba accddc, which I use in my example below.


Example, if I say in the subject line of the post:

“…(FALL) This week it’s the B rhyme line.”

my Décima might be…

NO!

As the end wept upon the land,

we could hear the approaching fall.

Justice answered the trumpet’s call,

trusting the fight to her troop’s hand.

 

Fate trembles with haste to expand,

through misdeeds by her shameless foe.

Past foolish decisions now crow,

“Wait—no—this was not meant to be.”

They beg the nation, “Hear our plea.

Heal honor, shout, no…no… NO!”

 

Notice the example prompt word ‘FALL’ is in line 2, the first B line, and its rhyme in is in line 3, matching the rhyming pattern of abba accddc.


For today’s challenge, the word LOOK must be one of the C line words. Then the other C line(s) word(s) must rhyme with LOOK.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 23 (FALL) This week, it’s the B rhyme line.

This week’s prompt works perfectly with the Haiku Challenge prompt of (CLIP & WINGS), so you could do a haiku with those words for one post and continue your poetry message/story with the Décima prompt of FALL.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (CLIP & WINGS this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for FALL, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word FALL must be one of the B line words. Then the other B line(s) word(s) must rhyme with FALL.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 22 (BLEND) This week, it’s the A rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (Cup & Sip this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for BLEND, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word BLEND must be one of the A line words. Then the other A line(s) word(s) must rhyme with BLEND .

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 21 (TIP) This week, it’s the D rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (Morrow & Surge this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for SMILE, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word TIP must be one of the D line words. Then the other D line(s) word(s) must rhyme with TIP.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 20 (SMILE) This week, it’s the C rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (Day & Flaw this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for SMILE, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word SMILE must be one of the C line words. Then the other C line(s) word(s) must rhyme with SMILE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 19 (RIDE) This week, it’s the B rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (Trip & Whip this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for STAY, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduleD Décima Poetry Challenge how to and what not.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word RIDE must be one of the B line words. Then the other B line(s) word(s) must rhyme with RIDE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 18 (STAY) This week, it’s the A rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (Meet and Part this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for PRIZE, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word STAYmust be one of the A line words. Then the other A line(s) word(s) must rhyme with STAY.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 17 (PRIZE) This week, it’s the D rhyme line.

That’s right everybody. I went there. I gave you the D rhyme… and with this word of all the words in the world. Don’t hate me because you’ve been challenged. Hate me because I’m beautifully insignificant.

But I really chose the word because it went well with the theme of the challenges this week. You can do a part two of your haiku if you did one, and if you want to go in that direction.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (Eye and Light this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for GROW, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word PRIZE must be one of the D line words. Then the other D line(s) word(s) must rhyme with PRIZE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 16 (GROW) This week, it’s the C rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge that often has prompts (Destruct and Self this week) that share a central theme, at least in my head, with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  1. To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for KIND, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the C rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word GROW must be one of the C line words. Then the other C line(s) word(s) must rhyme with GROW.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 15 (KIND) This week, it’s the B rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge that often has prompts (Chimpanzee&Kiss this week) that share a central theme, at least in my head, with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word KIND must be one of the B line words. Then the other B line(s) word(s) must rhyme with KIND.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 14 (BIRD) This week, it’s the A rhyme line.

This week, I recommend going with a synonym. There aren’t a lot of natural rhymes for BIRD. I used a word generator this week, just to see what happened. I did it with the Haiku Challenge as well. I thought it interesting the three words that came up, under a search for each word alone.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge that often has prompts (Finger&Planet this week) that share a central theme, at least in my head, with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.

For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.

For today’s challenge, the word BIRD must be one of the A line words. Then the other A line(s) word(s) must rhyme with BIRD.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 13 (TRUE) This week, it’s the C rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge that often has prompts (Dwindle&Ripple this week) that share a central theme, at least in my head, with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.

For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.

For today’s challenge, the word TRUE must be one of the C line words. Then the other C line(s) word(s) must rhyme with TRUE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 12 (WIND) This week, it’s the B rhyme line.

A REMINDER. For some of us when we get an idea in our head, we forget everything else. Remember, WIND has two pronunciations that will change what rhymes you could do.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge that often has prompts (Intent&Thought this week) that share a central theme, at least in my head, with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.

For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.

For today’s challenge, the word WIND must be one of the B line words. Then the other B line(s) word(s) must rhyme with WIND.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 11 (STORY). This week, it’s the A or C rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

To read poems so far entered this week, click HERE to go to the comment section.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge that often has prompts (Face&Change this week) that share a central theme, at least in my head, with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.

For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.

For today’s challenge, the word STORY must be one of the A or C line words. Then the other A or C line(s) word(s) must rhyme with STORY.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback, if you don’t already know how.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 10 (SENSE). This week, it’s the D rhyme spot.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem. If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

This week I decided to link the Haiku Challenge Prompt words with the Décima prompt. You don’t have to do so, but if you want to try, all you do is write one of them, and then stay along the same theme when writing the other. Just make sure to put the appropriate link in the appropriate challenge comments. Click HERE to go to the Haiku Challenge for this week.

 

You can now use the

Synonym

of the Prompt Word. This will make for variety and a bit more freedom to fully get your message across.

I’m not doing this just because this week’s Prompt word is a bit difficult. I intend to use it for my Décima. However, this freedom in the Haiku Challenges over the years has produced some great poetry.

 

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines (stanza) of poetry that rhyme but in this case, there is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to.
In addition, each line must only have 8 syllables.
The rhyme pattern is;
a
b
b
a
a
c
c
d
d
c

For this particular challenge, the word SENSE must be one of the D position words. Then the other D position(s) word(s) must rhyme with SENSE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

This week is the 

D rhyme spot.

This week’s inspiration is to use

SENSE

as one of your “D” words, and meaning you use SENSE in one spot, and its rhyme in the other.

If you are having a bit of trouble with this prompt, just write whatever you are inspired to do as long as it is a Décima.

Tools you might need to write the poem are:
RhymeZone.com,
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put a link, Pingback, of this challenge in your post, to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate., but this is not a must to join in.

If you choose to put the link in your post, this is a Ping Back. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback, if you have never done one before. Basically, any time you click on a link in an article or post, that’s a Ping Back.

Please share this post on your Social Media, such as Twitter or FB. As with the pingback, this is not a requirement. Reblogging is great as well.

Some people also like to copy the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 9 (NEXT). This week, it’s the B rhyme spot.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem. If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

IMPORTANT UPDATE/CHANGE to the CHALLENGE!

You can now use the Synonym of the Prompt Word. This will make for variety and a bit more freedom to fully get your message across.

I’m not doing this just because this week’s Prompt word is a bit difficult. I intend to use it for my Décima. However, this freedom in the Haiku Challenges over the years has produced some great poetry.

 

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines (stanza) of poetry that rhyme but in this case, there is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to.
In addition, each line must only have 8 syllables.
The rhyme pattern is;
a
b
b
a
a
c
c
d
d
c

For this particular challenge, the word NEXT must be one of the B position words. Then the other B position(s) word(s) must rhyme with NEXT.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

This week is the 

B rhyme spot.

This week’s inspiration is to use

NEXT

as one of your “B” words, and meaning you use NEXT in one spot, and its rhyme in the other.

If you are having a bit of trouble with this prompt, just write whatever you are inspired to do as long as it is a Décima.

Tools you might need to write the poem are:
RhymeZone.com,
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put a link, Pingback, of this challenge in your post, to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate., but this is not a must to join in.

If you choose to put the link in your post, this is a Ping Back. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback, if you have never done one before. Basically, any time you click on a link in an article or post, that’s a Ping Back.

Please share this post on your Social Media, such as Twitter or FB. As with the pingback, this is not a requirement. Reblogging is great as well.

Some people also like to copy the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 8 (FIRE). This week, it’s the A rhyme spot.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem. If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

This week, try and write another post using the Haiku challenge words, linking the two poems’ meanings together. It’s not a must, just a suggestion to challenge the creativity a bit more.

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines (stanza) of poetry that rhyme but in this case, there is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to.
In addition, each line must only have 8 syllables.
The rhyme pattern is;
a
b
b
a
a
c
c
d
d
c

For this particular challenge, the word FIRE must be one of the A position words. Then the other two A position(s) word(s) must rhyme with FIRE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

This week is the 

A rhyme spot.

This week’s inspiration is to use

FIRE

as one of your “A” words, and meaning you use FIRE in one spot, and its rhyme in the other.

If you are having a bit of trouble with this prompt, just write whatever you are inspired to do as long as it is a Décima.

Tools you might need to write the poem are:
RhymeZone.com,
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put a link, Pingback, of this challenge in your post, to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate., but this is not a must to join in.

If you choose to put the link in your post, this is a Ping Back. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback, if you have never done one before. Basically, any time you click on a link in an article or post, that’s a Ping Back.

Please share this post on your Social Media, such as Twitter or FB. As with the pingback, this is not a requirement. Reblogging is great as well.

Some people also like to copy the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 7 (DREAM). This week, it’s the A rhyme spot.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem. If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

 

 

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines (stanza) of poetry that rhyme but in this case there is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to.
In addition each line must only have 8 syllables.
The rhyme pattern is;
a
b
b
a
a
c
c
d
d
c

For this particular challenge the word DREAM must be one of the A position words. Then the other two A position/s word/s must rhyme with DREAM.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

This week is the 

A rhyme spot.

This week’s inspiration is to use

DREAM

as one of your “A” words, and meaning you use DREAM in one spot, and its rhyme in the other.

If you are having a bit of trouble with this prompt, just write whatever you are inspired to do as long as it is a Décima.

Tools you might need to write the poem are:
RhymeZone.com,
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put a link, Ping Back, of this challenge in your post, to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate., but this is not a must to join in.

If you choose to put the link in your post, this is a Ping Back. Click HERE to find out how to do a Ping Back, if you have never done one before. Basically, any time you click on a link in an article or post, that’s a Ping Back.

Please share this post on your Social Media, such as Twitter or FB. As with the Ping Back, this is not a requirement. Reblogging is great as well.

Some people also like to copy the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 6 (Eye). This week, it’s the B rhyme spot.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem. If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Click the name of my Décima below to see my take on this weeks prompt word for an example. It is the second part of one I wrote last week.

A Foolish Vow

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines (stanza) of poetry that rhyme but in this case there is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to.
In addition each line must only have 8 syllables.
The rhyme pattern is;
a
b
b
a
a
c
c
d
d
c

For this particular challenge the word EYE must be one of the B position words. Then the other two C position words must rhyme with EYE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

This week is the 

B rhyme spot.

This week’s inspiration is to use

EYE

as one of your “B” words, and meaning you use EYE in one spot, and its rhyme in the other.

If you are having a bit of trouble with this prompt, just write whatever you are inspired to do as long as it is a Décima.

Tools you might need to write the poem are:
RhymeZone.com,
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put a link, Ping Back, of this challenge in your post, to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate., but this is not a must to join in.

If you choose to put the link in your post, this is a Ping Back. Click HERE to find out how to do a Ping Back, if you have never done one before. Basically, any time you click on a link in an article or post, that’s a Ping Back.

Please share this post on your Social Media, such as Twitter or FB. As with the Ping Back, this is not a requirement. Reblogging is great as well.

Some people also like to copy the challenge image into their post. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 5 (MATE). This week, it’s the C spot.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem. If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines (stanza) of poetry that rhyme but in this case there is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to.
In addition each line must only have 8 syllables.
The rhyme pattern is;
a
b
b
a
a
c
c
d
d
c

For this particular challenge the word MATE must be one of the C position words. Then the other two C position words must rhyme with MATE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

This week is the 

C rhyme spot.

This week’s inspiration is to use

Mate

as one of your “B” words, and meaning you use Itch in one spot, and its rhyme in the other.

 

If you are having a bit of trouble with this prompt, just write whatever you are inspired to do as long as it is a Décima.

Tools you might need to write the poem are:
RhymeZone.com,
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put a link, Ping Back, of this challenge in your post, to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate., but this is not a must to join in.

If you choose to put the link in your post, this is a Ping Back. Click HERE to find out how to do a Ping Back, if you have never done one before. Basically, any time you click on a link in an article or post, that’s a Ping Back.

Please share this post on your Social Media, such as Twitter or FB. As with the Ping Back, this is not a requirement. Reblogging is great as well.

Some people also like to copy the challenge image into their post. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image