Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 324 FURY&SLOW

Drop by on Wednesday for the Décima Poetry Challenge. Sometimes the two challenges have similar themes you can unite over the week.

Check out the COMMENTS for entries this week, and come back throughout the week to see more links to poems as they come in.

Click HERE for last week’s collected links for easy access to the poems of last week’s poets.

Click HERE. To learn about the new style I’ve created called Shi Rensa Haiku and how to write one, maybe even for the challenges.



How to write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Fury, Slow
HowManySyllables.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster Dictionary

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help, visit HowManySyllables.com. (You would be surprised at how many syllables some words actually have.)
    • Words have different definitions and you use the definitions that work for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  1.  
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
    • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


The Challenge Words!

Fury&Slow

Not sure how to write a Haiku? Click HERE for a quick How to write Haiku Poem in English Form with links to posts for other forms of Haiku.

Much Respect-Much Love

Ronovan


 


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

@RonovanWrites

 © Copyright-All rights reserved by ronovanwrites.wordpress.com 2020

 

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 23 (FALL) This week, it’s the B rhyme line.

This week’s prompt works perfectly with the Haiku Challenge prompt of (CLIP & WINGS), so you could do a haiku with those words for one post and continue your poetry message/story with the Décima prompt of FALL.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (CLIP & WINGS this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for FALL, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word FALL must be one of the B line words. Then the other B line(s) word(s) must rhyme with FALL.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 323 Clip&Wings

Drop by on Wednesday for the Décima Poetry Challenge. Sometimes the two challenges have similar themes you can unite over the week.

Check out the COMMENTS for entries this week, and come back throughout the week to see more links to poems as they come in.

Click HERE for last week’s collected links for easy access to the poems of last week’s poets.

Click HERE. To learn about the new style I’ve created called Shi Rensa Haiku and how to write one, maybe even for the challenges.



How to write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Clip, Wings
HowManySyllables.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster Dictionary

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help, visit HowManySyllables.com. (You would be surprised at how many syllables some words actually have.)
    • Words have different definitions and you use the definitions that work for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  1.  
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
    • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


The Challenge Words!

Clip&Wings

Not sure how to write a Haiku? Click HERE for a quick How to write Haiku Poem in English Form with links to posts for other forms of Haiku.

Much Respect-Much Love

Ronovan


 


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

@RonovanWrites

 © Copyright-All rights reserved by ronovanwrites.wordpress.com 2020

 

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 22 (BLEND) This week, it’s the A rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (Cup & Sip this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for BLEND, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word BLEND must be one of the A line words. Then the other A line(s) word(s) must rhyme with BLEND .

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 322 Cup&Sip

Drop by on Wednesday for the Décima Poetry Challenge. Sometimes the two challenges have similar themes you can unite over the week.

Check out the COMMENTS for entries this week, and come back throughout the week to see more links to poems as they come in.

Click HERE for last week’s collected links for easy access to the poems of last week’s poets.

Click HERE. To learn about the new style I’ve created called Shi Rensa Haiku and how to write one, maybe even for the challenges.



How to write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Cup, Sip
HowManySyllables.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster Dictionary

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help, visit HowManySyllables.com. (You would be surprised at how many syllables some words actually have.)
    • Words have different definitions and you use the definitions that work for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  1.  
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
    • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


The Challenge Words!

Cup&Sip

Not sure how to write a Haiku? Click HERE for a quick How to write Haiku Poem in English Form with links to posts for other forms of Haiku.

Much Respect-Much Love

Ronovan


 


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

@RonovanWrites

 © Copyright-All rights reserved by ronovanwrites.wordpress.com 2020

 

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 21 (TIP) This week, it’s the D rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (Morrow & Surge this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for SMILE, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word TIP must be one of the D line words. Then the other D line(s) word(s) must rhyme with TIP.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 321 Morrow&Surge

 

Drop by on Wednesday for the Décima Poetry Challenge. Sometimes the two challenges have similar themes you can unite over the week.

Check out the COMMENTS for entries this week, and come back throughout the week to see more links to poems as they come in.

Click HERE for last weeks collected links for easy access to the poems of last week’s poets.

Click HERE. To learn about the new style I’ve created called Shi Rensa Haiku and how to write one, maybe even for the challenges.



How to write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Morrow, Surge
HowManySyllables.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster Dictionary

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help, visit HowManySyllables.com. (You would be surprised at how many syllables some words actually have.)
    • Words have different definitions and you use the definitions that work for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  1.  
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
    • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


The Challenge Words!

Morrow&Surge

Not sure how to write a Haiku? Click HERE for a quick How to write Haiku Poem in English Form with links to posts for other forms of Haiku.

Much Respect-Much Love

Ronovan


 


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

@RonovanWrites

 © Copyright-All rights reserved by ronovanwrites.wordpress.com 2020

 

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 20 (SMILE) This week, it’s the C rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (Day & Flaw this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for SMILE, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word SMILE must be one of the C line words. Then the other C line(s) word(s) must rhyme with SMILE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 320 Day&Flaw


I looked up FLAW in the thesaurus and liked the world FOIBLE. I clicked it and the definition had an example (an all-too-human foible.). I’ve always liked the word foible. I just like the way it sounds. That’s a big part of why I like poetry, the way you can use the sounds of words to help create or convey a step above what the words themselves alone mean.

It’s the painting pictures with words you’ve heard about so often.

It’s not just “The blue sky spreads her shawl over her twin, the ocean, protecting her from death by the Sun’s kiss.”

It’s “The vault of heaven lowers its cerulean veil with each day’s end, to reveal treasures beyond.”

It’s “The celestial sphere shimmers like sapphires with each passing moment.”

Why didn’t I use foible in these examples? That would be helping. Me? Help? Never… MUahahahahhaahaha. (That’s my maniacal laugh.)



Drop by on Wednesday for the Décima Poetry Challenge. Sometimes the two challenges have similar themes you can unite over the week.

Check out the COMMENTS for entries this week, and come back throughout the week to see more links to poems as they come in.

 

Click HERE. To learn about the new style I’ve created called Shi Rensa Haiku and how to write one, maybe even for the challenges.



How to write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Day, Flaw
HowManySyllables.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster Dictionary

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help, visit HowManySyllables.com. (You would be surprised at how many syllables some words actually have.)
    • Words have different definitions and you use the definitions that work for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  1.  
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
    • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


The Challenge Words!

Day&Flaw

Not sure how to write a Haiku? Click HERE for a quick How to write Haiku Poem in English Form with links to posts for other forms of Haiku.

Much Respect-Much Love

Ronovan


 


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

@RonovanWrites

 © Copyright-All rights reserved by ronovanwrites.wordpress.com 2020

 

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 19 (RIDE) This week, it’s the B rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (Trip & Whip this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for STAY, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduleD Décima Poetry Challenge how to and what not.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word RIDE must be one of the B line words. Then the other B line(s) word(s) must rhyme with RIDE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 319 Trip&Whip

 


Drop by on Wednesday for the Décima Poetry Challenge. Sometimes the two challenges have similar themes you can unite over the week.

Check out the COMMENTS for entries this week, and come back throughout the week to see more links to poems as they come in.

Click HERE for last week’s Haiku links using the prompt words Meet&Part.

Click HERE. To learn about the new style I’ve created called Shi Rensa Haiku and how to write one, maybe even for the challenges.



How to write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Trip, Whip
HowManySyllables.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster Dictionary

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help, visit HowManySyllables.com. (You would be surprised at how many syllables some words actually have.)
    • Words have different definitions and you use the definitions that work for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  1.  
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
    • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


The Challenge Words!

Trip&Whip

Not sure how to write a Haiku? Click HERE for a quick How to write Haiku Poem in English Form with links to posts for other forms of Haiku.

Much Respect-Much Love

Ronovan


 


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

@RonovanWrites

 © Copyright-All rights reserved by ronovanwrites.wordpress.com 2020

 

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 18 (STAY) This week, it’s the A rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (Meet and Part this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for PRIZE, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word STAYmust be one of the A line words. Then the other A line(s) word(s) must rhyme with STAY.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 318 Meet&Part

Please Read. I do this challenge for a few reasons two of them are:

  1. To give prompts for all types of writers that make it easy for them to have a go-to place each week in addition to their other spots.
  2. To give those honoring my challenge with their efforts a few extra visitors each week to find their blogs and read their poems. I’ve seen the increase in the likes on their poems increase to amazing numbers over the 6+ years this weekly challenge has been running without interruption.
  3. To create friendships between people from all over the world. And that has happened and I am so happy to see those bongs grow strong.

But, some don’t receive the visits I would like for them to have. I think it’s mostly due to when the poems are written. As we all know, the beginning of the week is the hot time for blogging. So, if you can keep it in mind to come back and visit some of those poets, I would appreciate it. You can click like, if you like it, leave a comment if you’re inspired to. I sometimes just comment with a reaction, a haiku of my on in response to there, or a simple “Nice. I like it.” but I only say that if I think it’s “nice” and “I like it”. But if I don’t say anything, that doesn’t mean I don’t think it’s nice. 🙂 Sometimes I’m at a low ebb of energy with all this Chronic Fatigue along with the allergic to heat… and I live near Atlanta, GA. Just imagine… CF+HeatAllergy+Atlanta=MeltingRonovan


Drop by on Wednesday for the Décima Poetry Challenge. Sometimes the two challenges have similar themes you can unite over the week.

Check out the COMMENTS for entries this week, and come back throughout the week to see more links to poems as they come in.

Click HERE for last week’s Haiku links using the prompt words Eye&Light.

Click HERE. To learn about the new style I’ve created called Shi Rensa Haiku and how to write one, maybe even for the challenges.



How to write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Meet, Part
HowManySyllables.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster Dictionary

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help, visit HowManySyllables.com. (You would be surprised at how many syllables some words actually have.)
    • Words have different definitions and you use the definitions that work for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  1.  
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
    • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


The Challenge Words!

Meet&Part

Not sure how to write a Haiku? Click HERE for a quick How to write Haiku Poem in English Form with links to posts for other forms of Haiku.

Much Respect-Much Love

Ronovan


 


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

@RonovanWrites

 © Copyright-All rights reserved by ronovanwrites.wordpress.com 2020

 

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 17 (PRIZE) This week, it’s the D rhyme line.

That’s right everybody. I went there. I gave you the D rhyme… and with this word of all the words in the world. Don’t hate me because you’ve been challenged. Hate me because I’m beautifully insignificant.

But I really chose the word because it went well with the theme of the challenges this week. You can do a part two of your haiku if you did one, and if you want to go in that direction.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (Eye and Light this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for GROW, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word PRIZE must be one of the D line words. Then the other D line(s) word(s) must rhyme with PRIZE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 317 Eye&Light

Please come by on Wednesday for the new Décima Poetry Challenge. I sometimes have the prompt related to the Haiku words. It’s kind of fun to have the two work together in your own poetry.

If you would like to try my new form of Haiku, please do. To learn about Shi Rensa Haiku and how to write one, click HERE.

Click HERE for last week’s Haiku links using the prompt words Destruct and Self.

Check out the responses below in the comments for links to our Poets haiku this week.

How to write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Eye, Sight
HowManySyllables.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster Dictionary

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help, visit HowManySyllables.com. (You would be surprised at how many syllables some words actually have.)
    • Words have different definitions and you use the definitions that work for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  1.  
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
    • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


The Challenge Words!

Eye&Light

Not sure how to write a Haiku? Click HERE for a quick How to write Haiku Poem in English Form with links to posts for other forms of Haiku.

Much Respect-Much Love

Ronovan


 


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

@RonovanWrites

 © Copyright-All rights reserved by ronovanwrites.wordpress.com 2020

 

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 16 (GROW) This week, it’s the C rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge that often has prompts (Destruct and Self this week) that share a central theme, at least in my head, with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  1. To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for KIND, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the C rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word GROW must be one of the C line words. Then the other C line(s) word(s) must rhyme with GROW.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 316 Destruct&Self

Please come by on Wednesday for the new Décima Poetry Challenge. I sometimes have the prompt related to the Haiku words. It’s kind of fun to have the two work together in your own poetry.

Click HERE for last week’s Haiku links using the prompt words Chimpanzee and Kiss.

Check out the responses below in the comments for links to our Poets haiku this week.

How to write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Destruct, Self
HowManySyllables.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster Dictionary

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help, visit HowManySyllables.com. (You would be surprised at how many syllables some words actually have.)
    • Words have different definitions and you use the definitions that work for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  1.  
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
    • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


The Challenge Words!

Destruct&Self

Not sure how to write a Haiku? Click HERE for a quick How to write Haiku Poem in English Form with links to posts for other forms of Haiku.

Much Respect-Much Love

Ronovan


 


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

@RonovanWrites

 © Copyright-All rights reserved by ronovanwrites.wordpress.com 2020

 

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 15 (KIND) This week, it’s the B rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge that often has prompts (Chimpanzee&Kiss this week) that share a central theme, at least in my head, with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word KIND must be one of the B line words. Then the other B line(s) word(s) must rhyme with KIND.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 315 Chimpanzee&Kiss

Already with 18 poets as of Tuesday 11:59 PM. Missing some of my people from last week.

Please come by on Wednesday for the new Décima Poetry Challenge. I sometimes have the prompt related to the Haiku words. It’s kind of fun to have the two work together in your own poetry.

Check out the responses below in the comments for links to our Poets haiku this week.

How to write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Chimpanzee, Kiss
HowManySyllables.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster Dictionary

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help, visit HowManySyllables.com. (You would be surprised at how many syllables some words actually have.)
    • Words have different definitions and you use the definitions that work for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  1.  
  2. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  3. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
    • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


The Challenge Words!

Chimpanzee&Kiss

Not sure how to write a Haiku? Click HERE for a quick How to write Haiku Poem in English Form with links to posts for other forms of Haiku.

Much Respect-Much Love

Ronovan


 


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

@RonovanWrites

 © Copyright-All rights reserved by ronovanwrites.wordpress.com 2020

 

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 14 (BIRD) This week, it’s the A rhyme line.

This week, I recommend going with a synonym. There aren’t a lot of natural rhymes for BIRD. I used a word generator this week, just to see what happened. I did it with the Haiku Challenge as well. I thought it interesting the three words that came up, under a search for each word alone.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge that often has prompts (Finger&Planet this week) that share a central theme, at least in my head, with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.

For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.

For today’s challenge, the word BIRD must be one of the A line words. Then the other A line(s) word(s) must rhyme with BIRD.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

 

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