Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 13 (TRUE) This week, it’s the C rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge that often has prompts (Dwindle&Ripple this week) that share a central theme, at least in my head, with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.

For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.

For today’s challenge, the word TRUE must be one of the C line words. Then the other C line(s) word(s) must rhyme with TRUE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 313 Dwindle&Ripple

Please come by on Wednesday for the new Décima Poetry Challenge. I sometimes have the prompt related to the Haiku words. It’s kind of fun to have the two work together in your own poetry.

Click HERE for the links in the comments section of those who have participated so far. Link jumps to the Comments below. All other post links open in new tabs unless otherwise noted.

How to write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Dwindle, Ripple
HowManySyllables.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster Dictionary

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help, visit HowManySyllables.com. (You would be surprised at how many syllables some words actually have.)
    • Words have different definitions and you use the definitions that work for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  1. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  2. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
    • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


The Challenge Words!

Dwindle&Ripple

Not sure how to write a Haiku? Click HERE for a quick How to write Haiku Poem in English Form with links to posts for other forms of Haiku.

Much Respect-Much Love

Ronovan


 


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

@RonovanWrites

 © Copyright-All rights reserved by ronovanwrites.wordpress.com 2020

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 12 (WIND) This week, it’s the B rhyme line.

A REMINDER. For some of us when we get an idea in our head, we forget everything else. Remember, WIND has two pronunciations that will change what rhymes you could do.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge that often has prompts (Intent&Thought this week) that share a central theme, at least in my head, with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.

For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.

For today’s challenge, the word WIND must be one of the B line words. Then the other B line(s) word(s) must rhyme with WIND.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 312 Intent&Thought

Examples Provided using this week’s prompt words, just in case you are new to Haiku.

Please come by on Wednesday for the new Décima Poetry Challenge. I sometimes have the prompt related to the Haiku words. It’s kind of fun to have the two work together in your own poetry.

Click those links in the comments to love your fellow poets Haiku. Click HERE for a quick jump to the comments section below for those links to Haiku.

How to write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Intent, Thought
HowManySyllables.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster Dictionary

Example #1:

Do you have intent

while you dream of the future,

give thought to your past.

 

Example #2  A Nature Haiku:

worker bee’s intent,

to create a home for her queen,

great thought is given

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help, visit HowManySyllables.com. (You would be surprised at how many syllables some words actually have.)
    • Words have different definitions and you use the definitions that work for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  1. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  2. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
    • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.


The Challenge Words!

Intent&Thought

Not sure how to write a Haiku? Click HERE for a quick How to write Haiku Poem in English Form with links to posts for other forms of Haiku.

Much Respect-Much Love

Ronovan


 


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

@RonovanWrites

 © Copyright-All rights reserved by ronovanwrites.wordpress.com 2020

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 11 (STORY). This week, it’s the A or C rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

To read poems so far entered this week, click HERE to go to the comment section.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge that often has prompts (Face&Change this week) that share a central theme, at least in my head, with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.

For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.

For today’s challenge, the word STORY must be one of the A or C line words. Then the other A or C line(s) word(s) must rhyme with STORY.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback, if you don’t already know how.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

the earth burns – a haiku poem

winds of change begin

from east to west and beyond,

earth’s face turns and  burns
 
 

A Haiku for my challenge this week: Change & Face.

Tuesday Poetry. Standard Image.

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

 

change facer – a haiku poem

to face the nation

each one of us must reflect

our reason to change

 
 

A Haiku for my challenge this week: Change & Face.

Standard Monday Poetry Image

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

 

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 311 Change&Face

Please come by on Wednesday for the new Décima Poetry Challenge (STORY) is the word this week. I sometimes have the prompt related to the Haiku words. It’s kind of fun to have the two work together in your own poetry.

Click those links to love…

some great Haiku. Click HERE to get to the comments below.

How to write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Change, Face
HowManySyllables.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster Dictionary

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help, visit HowManySyllables.com. (You would be surprised at how many syllables some words actually have.)
    • Words have different definitions and you use the definitions that work for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  1. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  2. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
    • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.
  3. The Challenge currently BEGINS at 8 AM EST (New York City time) on Mondays. And a DEADLINE is Noon EST (New York City time) on the Sunday following the Challenge Post release.


The Challenge Words!

Change&Face

Not sure how to write a Haiku? Click HERE for a quick How to write Haiku Poem in English Form with links to posts for other forms of Haiku.

Much Respect-Much Love

Ronovan


 


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

@RonovanWrites

 © Copyright-All rights reserved by ronovanwrites.wordpress.com 2020

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 10 (SENSE). This week, it’s the D rhyme spot.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem. If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

This week I decided to link the Haiku Challenge Prompt words with the Décima prompt. You don’t have to do so, but if you want to try, all you do is write one of them, and then stay along the same theme when writing the other. Just make sure to put the appropriate link in the appropriate challenge comments. Click HERE to go to the Haiku Challenge for this week.

 

You can now use the

Synonym

of the Prompt Word. This will make for variety and a bit more freedom to fully get your message across.

I’m not doing this just because this week’s Prompt word is a bit difficult. I intend to use it for my Décima. However, this freedom in the Haiku Challenges over the years has produced some great poetry.

 

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines (stanza) of poetry that rhyme but in this case, there is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to.
In addition, each line must only have 8 syllables.
The rhyme pattern is;
a
b
b
a
a
c
c
d
d
c

For this particular challenge, the word SENSE must be one of the D position words. Then the other D position(s) word(s) must rhyme with SENSE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

This week is the 

D rhyme spot.

This week’s inspiration is to use

SENSE

as one of your “D” words, and meaning you use SENSE in one spot, and its rhyme in the other.

If you are having a bit of trouble with this prompt, just write whatever you are inspired to do as long as it is a Décima.

Tools you might need to write the poem are:
RhymeZone.com,
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put a link, Pingback, of this challenge in your post, to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate., but this is not a must to join in.

If you choose to put the link in your post, this is a Ping Back. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback, if you have never done one before. Basically, any time you click on a link in an article or post, that’s a Ping Back.

Please share this post on your Social Media, such as Twitter or FB. As with the pingback, this is not a requirement. Reblogging is great as well.

Some people also like to copy the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

a whispered symphony – a haiku poem

in the garden a voice
leads a whispered symphony
to share with the world
 
 

A Haiku for my challenge this week: Share & Voice.

Can you find Blue Bells four little friends?

whispered symphony image impressionist

Tuesday Poetry. Standard Image.

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

 

a good time – a haiku poem

voice frustrations while

picking up good pulsations

shares stimulations
 
 

Name that inspiration in the comments below.

 

A Haiku for my challenge this week: Share & Voice.

Tuesday Poetry. Standard Image.

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

 

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 310 Share&Voice

We already have some FUN Haiku this week. Visit the comments and check them all. Just click HERE to jump to THERE.

Please come by on Wednesday for the new Décima Poetry Challenge. I sometimes have the prompt related to the Haiku words. It’s kind of fun to have the two work together in your own poetry.

How to write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

Remember to come back and visit the comments section during the week for your fellow poets’ entries!

Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Share, Voice
HowManySyllables.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster Dictionary

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help, visit HowManySyllables.com. (You would be surprised at how many syllables some words actually have.)
    • Words have different definitions and you use the definitions that work for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  1. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  2. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
    • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.
  3. The Challenge currently BEGINS at 8 AM EST (New York City time) on Mondays. And a DEADLINE is Noon EST (New York City time) on the Sunday following the Challenge Post release.


The Challenge Words!

Share&Voice

Not sure how to write a Haiku? Click HERE for a quick How to write Haiku Poem in English Form with links to posts for other forms of Haiku.

Much Respect-Much Love

Ronovan


 


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

@RonovanWrites

 © Copyright-All rights reserved by ronovanwrites.wordpress.com 2020

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 9 (NEXT). This week, it’s the B rhyme spot.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem. If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

IMPORTANT UPDATE/CHANGE to the CHALLENGE!

You can now use the Synonym of the Prompt Word. This will make for variety and a bit more freedom to fully get your message across.

I’m not doing this just because this week’s Prompt word is a bit difficult. I intend to use it for my Décima. However, this freedom in the Haiku Challenges over the years has produced some great poetry.

 

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines (stanza) of poetry that rhyme but in this case, there is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to.
In addition, each line must only have 8 syllables.
The rhyme pattern is;
a
b
b
a
a
c
c
d
d
c

For this particular challenge, the word NEXT must be one of the B position words. Then the other B position(s) word(s) must rhyme with NEXT.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

This week is the 

B rhyme spot.

This week’s inspiration is to use

NEXT

as one of your “B” words, and meaning you use NEXT in one spot, and its rhyme in the other.

If you are having a bit of trouble with this prompt, just write whatever you are inspired to do as long as it is a Décima.

Tools you might need to write the poem are:
RhymeZone.com,
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put a link, Pingback, of this challenge in your post, to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate., but this is not a must to join in.

If you choose to put the link in your post, this is a Ping Back. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback, if you have never done one before. Basically, any time you click on a link in an article or post, that’s a Ping Back.

Please share this post on your Social Media, such as Twitter or FB. As with the pingback, this is not a requirement. Reblogging is great as well.

Some people also like to copy the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

‘Torch Memory’ a Poem

It was a dark night back in that early May.

Orange light lit up the windows bright like the day.

Peeking through the curtains late that night,

there before my eyes was a truly evil sight.

My kin and his friend tied to the massive schoolyard tree.

I did not know then who these masked men might be.

White hoods and robes, with burning torches, glowed.

They slashed them both until arms heavy slowed.

No more energy did they have for more blows.

Both white and Black bloodied skin and clothes.

Released from the ropes, they both fell to earth.

White robes kicking what they thought of their worth.

The kin stayed hidden for weeks till fine.

Then he and his Black friend hung out by the schoolyard sign.

Being friends with another color back in 75,

was not the best idea if you wanted to stay alive.

As a teen in the South, you live your own mind.

And to most, there’s only one kind.

 

Tuesday Poetry. Standard Image.

An autobiographical poem. I don’t mean to take on the Black Lives Matter as if it were something that has happened to me. This experience is what imprinted me what hatred and evil does and how wrong it is to look at or treat anyone different than another person. That’s why I shared this.

HERE is some of my recent poetry related to Black Lives Matter to scroll through.

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

 

‘the illusion’ a Haiku

like undulant glass

history’s parity myth

fractures with pressure

 

 

A Haiku for my challenge this week: Break & Glass.

HERE is some of my recent poetry related to Black Lives Matter to scroll through.

Standard Monday Poetry Image

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

 

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 309 Break&Glass

Really good ones in the comment section below. Great variety.

Please come by on Wednesday for the new Décima Poetry Challenge. 

How to write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

Remember to come back and visit the comments section during the week for your fellow poets’ entries!

Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Break, Glass
HowManySyllables.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster Dictionary

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help, visit HowManySyllables.com. (You would be surprised at how many syllables some words actually have.)
    • Words have different definitions and you use the definitions that work for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  1. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenue by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  2. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
    • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.
  3. The Challenge currently BEGINS at 8 AM EST (New York City time) on Mondays. And a DEADLINE is Noon EST (New York City time) on the Sunday following the Challenge Post release.


The Challenge Words!

Break&Glass

Not sure how to write a Haiku? Click HERE for a quick How to write Haiku Poem in English Form with links to posts for other forms of Haiku.

Much Respect-Much Love

Ronovan


 


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

@RonovanWrites

 © Copyright-All rights reserved by ronovanwrites.wordpress.com 2020

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 8 (FIRE). This week, it’s the A rhyme spot.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem. If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

This week, try and write another post using the Haiku challenge words, linking the two poems’ meanings together. It’s not a must, just a suggestion to challenge the creativity a bit more.

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines (stanza) of poetry that rhyme but in this case, there is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to.
In addition, each line must only have 8 syllables.
The rhyme pattern is;
a
b
b
a
a
c
c
d
d
c

For this particular challenge, the word FIRE must be one of the A position words. Then the other two A position(s) word(s) must rhyme with FIRE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

This week is the 

A rhyme spot.

This week’s inspiration is to use

FIRE

as one of your “A” words, and meaning you use FIRE in one spot, and its rhyme in the other.

If you are having a bit of trouble with this prompt, just write whatever you are inspired to do as long as it is a Décima.

Tools you might need to write the poem are:
RhymeZone.com,
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put a link, Pingback, of this challenge in your post, to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate., but this is not a must to join in.

If you choose to put the link in your post, this is a Ping Back. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback, if you have never done one before. Basically, any time you click on a link in an article or post, that’s a Ping Back.

Please share this post on your Social Media, such as Twitter or FB. As with the pingback, this is not a requirement. Reblogging is great as well.

Some people also like to copy the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

‘nature’s health’ a Haiku

nature’s logic keeps

life with health and harmony

is without anger

 

A Haiku for my challenge this week: Anger and Logic.

Standard Monday Poetry Image

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

 

Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge 308 Anger&Logic

**LOOK FOR THE Décima PROMPT THIS WEEK AND DO A CONTINUATION OF YOUR HAIKU. Décima IS SIMPLY A RHYME POEM WITH A SET RHYME PATTERN.**

SEVERAL GREAT RESPONSES THIS WEEK. Do check them out.

(Sorry for shouting but I’m serious about this.)

Please come by on Wednesday for the new Décima Poetry Challenge. 

How to write Haiku in English. And how to do a Pingback.

Remember to come back and visit the comments section during the week for your fellow poets’ entries!

Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Anger, Logic
HowManySyllables.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster Dictionary

The Guidelines:

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like.
    • The link above has links on how to write Haibun and Tanka. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help, visit HowManySyllables.com. (You would be surprised at how many syllables some words actually have.)
    • Words have different definitions and you use the definitions that work for you Haiku. You can also use SYNONYMS. Go to Thesaurus.com for synonym help.
  1. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL and paste in a comment below so we can all go and visit your Haiku.
    • You can do a pingback. What’s a pingback? Place the URL from the address bar up top from this post as a link within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenge, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing with more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running that generates revenuse by your visit or by clicks on whatever WordPress has put up.
    • Click HERE for a detailed post on PINGBACKS.
  2. If you like, copy the image in this post and place it within their post, just to show the Haiku is part of this challenge.
    • I am not saying you need or even should, but if you would like to do so then go ahead.
  3. The Challenge currently BEGINS at 8 AM EST (New York City time) on Mondays. And a DEADLINE is Noon EST (New York City time) on the Sunday following the Challenge Post release.


The Challenge Words!

Anger&Logic

Not sure how to write a Haiku? Click HERE for a quick How to write Haiku Poem in English Form with links to posts for other forms of Haiku.

Much Respect-Much Love

Ronovan


 


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

@RonovanWrites

 © Copyright-All rights reserved by ronovanwrites.wordpress.com 2020

‘Feared or Loved’ a Haiku

stray cats open eyes

stay away from those who hate

close to those who love

 

A Haiku for my challenge this week: Open and Close.

Friday Poetry Standard Image

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.