Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 33: (BLIND) in the C rhyme line.

You may, if you wish, make some kind of link between the Haiku Challenge prompt of (LIFE and View). and BLIND.

The 2 CHALLENGES are SEPARATE but CAN BE combined if YOU CHOOSE to do so.


Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


  • To last week’s links Décima Poets’ poems written for the prompt for SLEEP, click HERE for all the links in one post. A good opportunity to check out some examples of Décima.

THE CHALLENGE

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster.com  Use this site for syllables. I’ve used several online counters and too many have given different counts for the same word, so I use the dictionary now. Also, in some parts of the English speaking world, the syllables may come out in the spoken language a bit differently. And that’s okay. Write to enjoy, too learn, and yes, try to get the syllables right, but above all create and enjoy.

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc with a choice of a break between lines 4 and 5, then being abba accddc, which I use in my example below.


For example, if I say in the subject line of the post:

“…(FALL) This week it’s the B rhyme line.”

my Décima might be…

NO!

As the end wept upon the land,

we could hear the approaching fall.

Justice answered the trumpet’s call,

trusting the fight to her troop’s hand.

 

Fate trembles with haste to expand,

through misdeeds by her shameless foe.

Past foolish decisions now crow,

“Wait—no—this was not meant to be.”

They beg the nation, “Hear our plea.

Heal honor, shout, no…no… NO!”

 

Notice the example prompt word ‘FALL’ is in line 2, the first B line, and its rhyme is in line 3, matching the rhyming pattern of abba accddc.


For today’s challenge, the word BLIND must be one of the C line words. Then the other C line(s) word(s) must rhyme with BLIND.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

 


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 32: (SLEEP) in the B rhyme line.

You may, if you wish, make some kind of link between the Haiku Challenge prompt of (EBB & Flow). and SLEEP.

The 2 CHALLENGES are SEPARATE but CAN BE combined if YOU CHOOSE to do so.


Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


  • To last week’s links Décima Poets’ poems written for the prompt for ONE, click HERE for all the links in one post. A good opportunity to check out some examples of Décima.

THE CHALLENGE

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster.com  Use this site for syllables. I’ve used several online counters and too many have given different counts for the same word, so I use the dictionary now. Also, in some parts of the English speaking world, the syllables may come out in the spoken language a bit differently. And that’s okay. Write to enjoy, too learn, and yes, try to get the syllables right, but above all create and enjoy.

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc with a choice of a break between lines 4 and 5, then being abba accddc, which I use in my example below.


For example, if I say in the subject line of the post:

“…(FALL) This week it’s the B rhyme line.”

my Décima might be…

NO!

As the end wept upon the land,

we could hear the approaching fall.

Justice answered the trumpet’s call,

trusting the fight to her troop’s hand.

 

Fate trembles with haste to expand,

through misdeeds by her shameless foe.

Past foolish decisions now crow,

“Wait—no—this was not meant to be.”

They beg the nation, “Hear our plea.

Heal honor, shout, no…no… NO!”

 

Notice the example prompt word ‘FALL’ is in line 2, the first B line, and its rhyme is in line 3, matching the rhyming pattern of abba accddc.


For today’s challenge, the word SLEEP must be one of the B line words. Then the other B line(s) word(s) must rhyme with SLEEP.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 31: (ONE) in the A rhyme line.

You may, if you wish, make some kind of link between the Haiku Challenge prompt of (FIRST & Heal). and ONE. I think these might work together with the right story idea.

The 2 CHALLENGES are SEPARATE but CAN BE combined if YOU CHOOSE to do so.


Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


  • To last week’s links Décima Poets’ poems written for the prompt for EXHALE, click HERE for all the links in one post. A good opportunity to check out some examples of Décima.

THE CHALLENGE

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster.com  Use this site for syllables. I’ve used several online counters and too many have given different counts for the same word, so I use the dictionary now. Also, in some parts of the English speaking world, the syllables may come out in the spoken language a bit differently. And that’s okay. Write to enjoy, too learn, and yes, try to get the syllables right, but above all create and enjoy.

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc with a choice of a break between lines 4 and 5, then being abba accddc, which I use in my example below.


For example, if I say in the subject line of the post:

“…(FALL) This week it’s the B rhyme line.”

my Décima might be…

NO!

As the end wept upon the land,

we could hear the approaching fall.

Justice answered the trumpet’s call,

trusting the fight to her troop’s hand.

 

Fate trembles with haste to expand,

through misdeeds by her shameless foe.

Past foolish decisions now crow,

“Wait—no—this was not meant to be.”

They beg the nation, “Hear our plea.

Heal honor, shout, no…no… NO!”

 

Notice the example prompt word ‘FALL’ is in line 2, the first B line, and its rhyme is in line 3, matching the rhyming pattern of abba accddc.


For today’s challenge, the word ONE must be one of the A line words. Then the other A line(s) word(s) must rhyme with ONE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 30: (EXHALE) in the C rhyme line.

I chose the word EXHALE this week with the idea, well I can’t tell you the idea because I don’t want to taint your thinking process. Exhale, two syllables but you can use synonyms.

I checked for plenty of rhyme words, as I usually do. I dislike trying to create a poem with only 5 or 6 rhyme options when all of us are doing them.

RHYME TIP: Sometimes I will take a word and break it up into multiple sounds and come up with rhymes that aren’t normally thought of. This is a tip from rappers who have to be extremely creative. I picked this one up from the rapper Eminem. I know it sounds like what a rhyme site does but you dive down deeper and it’s a lot of fun to come up with something that people read and think, “Where did that come from, and why didn’t I think to do that?”

You may, if you wish, make some kind of link between the Haiku Challenge prompt of (COLD & Fall). and EXHALE. I think these might work together with the right story idea.

The 2 CHALLENGES are SEPARATE but CAN BE combined if YOU CHOOSE to do so.


Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for FRIGHT, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster.com  Use this site for syllables. I’ve used several online counters and too many have given different counts for the same word, so I use the dictionary now. Also, in some parts of the English speaking world, the syllables may come out in the spoken language a bit differently. And that’s okay. Write to enjoy, too learn, and yes, try to get the syllables right, but above all create and enjoy.

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc with a choice of a break between lines 4 and 5, then being abba accddc, which I use in my example below.


For example, if I say in the subject line of the post:

“…(FALL) This week it’s the B rhyme line.”

my Décima might be…

NO!

As the end wept upon the land,

we could hear the approaching fall.

Justice answered the trumpet’s call,

trusting the fight to her troop’s hand.

 

Fate trembles with haste to expand,

through misdeeds by her shameless foe.

Past foolish decisions now crow,

“Wait—no—this was not meant to be.”

They beg the nation, “Hear our plea.

Heal honor, shout, no…no… NO!”

 

Notice the example prompt word ‘FALL’ is in line 2, the first B line, and its rhyme is in line 3, matching the rhyming pattern of abba accddc.


For today’s challenge, the word EXHALE must be one of the C line words. Then the other C line(s) word(s) must rhyme with EXHALE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 29 (FRIGHT) This week, it’s the A rhyme line.

I chose the word FRIGHT this week.

You may, if you wish, make some kind of link between the Haiku Challenge prompt of (BLOOM & Wet). and FRIGHT. Im thinking they could work well together, depending on how macabre you wanted to get. The HIAKU challenge can be switched out with synonyms.

The 2 CHALLENGES are SEPARATE but CAN BE combined if YOU CHOOSE to do so.


Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for FRIGHT, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster.com  Use this site for syllables. I’ve used several online counters and too many have given different counts for the same word, so I use the dictionary now. Also, in some parts of the English speaking world, the syllables may come out in the spoken language a bit differently. And that’s okay. Write to enjoy, too learn, and yes, try to get the syllables right, but above all create and enjoy.

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc with a choice of a break between lines 4 and 5, then being abba accddc, which I use in my example below.


For example, if I say in the subject line of the post:

“…(FALL) This week it’s the B rhyme line.”

my Décima might be…

NO!

As the end wept upon the land,

we could hear the approaching fall.

Justice answered the trumpet’s call,

trusting the fight to her troop’s hand.

 

Fate trembles with haste to expand,

through misdeeds by her shameless foe.

Past foolish decisions now crow,

“Wait—no—this was not meant to be.”

They beg the nation, “Hear our plea.

Heal honor, shout, no…no… NO!”

 

Notice the example prompt word ‘FALL’ is in line 2, the first B line, and its rhyme is in line 3, matching the rhyming pattern of abba accddc.


For today’s challenge, the word FRIGHT must be one of the A line words. Then the other A line(s) word(s) must rhyme with FRIGHT.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

How to Write The “10×10”.

A few months ago, after I started the Décima Poetry Challenge, I was wanted to create something of my own, as I tend to do. A 10 line poem with 10 syllables per line. It was inspired by a poet named Vocabularical and his participation in the challenge. He was a cool guy, with awesome ideas, and a way with words. I mean, if you’re going to give yourself a name like Vocabularical…you better be good. I was originally going to name the poetry form a Vocabularicon, which I think if you want to, you can, and if you think about it, you definitely will need to use great vocabulary to deliver that 10×10 form, see the next paragraph for what I mean.

What changed with the form was the syllables. I still wanted them to be 10 per line. Then I participated in MMA Storyline’s 100 Word Flash Fiction Challenge. I thought this challenge is perfect for trying out my new style for the very first time. So, I wrote 10 lines, 10 words per line, with only 10 syllables per line. Yes, that means only one syllable per word. Your word choice is even more vital here than in other poems. Other than perhaps a Haiku, especially the 3/5/3 version, that’s syllables, not necessarily words or even the non-existent 1/2/1 I’ve tried**.

The quick and dirty instructions: (links are to LiteraryDevices.net)

  • 10 LINES/verses
  • 10 ONE-SYLLABLE WORDS PER LINE.
  • DIVIDED INTO 5 Couplets See the example below.
  • With Couplets, meter is important. “Essentially, meter is the basic rhythmic structure of a line within a poem or poetic work. Meter functions as a means of imposing a specific number of syllables and emphasis when it comes to a line of poetry that adds to its musicality.”-LiteraryDevices.net
  • “The literary device “foot” is a measuring unit in poetry, which is made up of stressed and unstressed syllables… The combination of feet creates meter in poetry. Later, these meters are joined for the composition of a complete poem. Therefore, a foot is the formative unit of the meter.”

IF YOU WOULD LIKE, YOU COULD GROUP THE VERSES TOGETHER TO FORM A GEOMETRIC BLOCK. THAT WOULD BE KIND OF NEAT TO ACHIEVE.

  • Think about it, if you can get the exact same number of letters per line, keeping to the other guidelines mentioned, that would be a nice accomplishment.

Below is an example of the 10×10/Vocabularicon.

 

Daddy’s Baby Boy

They sneak at night, to pick their mid, fall  gourd,

But they know not,  they have crossed the Dark Lord.

 

The clouds do glow, to buy the fools some time,

and lead the way, clear of his broods’ wet grime.

 

They come each year, to choose for their blithe signs.

and with plans made, hunt one with thick lush vines

 

Once they find him, his life’s line is cut short,

pray what comes next, you’ve heard tell of a sort

 

The Dark Lord comes, his rage steams up the night,

It’s All Saint’s Eve, and Dad’s set for a fright.


Most of us self-taught poets have used poetic meter and feet for the entirety of our poetic lives. Meter, for this poem, is the shared length of the verses and the rhyme pattern. The feet are either stressed or unstressed words. Stressed is when you go up on the word or syllable. Since this poetry form is restricted to one-syllable words, you stress a word. For this poem  I’ve made the first part of each verse four words long, and the second six. As you read you quickly pick up both the feet and meter patterns with ease. Or so I hope. But, for each person their might the opposite feet emphasis than another person reading it. Also, feet are not as simple as four words here and six words there, you should also listen to how your words are working together to accomplish a natural rhythm and not one that’s hunted for. As I’ve been working with these types of poems, I’ve been trying to do better with meter and feet, but still have a long way to go. But…I keep writing.


**My How To Write A Haiku Poem In English Form post has been updated with some added information.

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© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 28 (FATE) This week, it’s the B rhyme line.

I chose the word FATE this week.

You may, if you wish, make some kind of link between the Haiku Challenge prompt of (DUST & Weed). and FATE.

The 2 CHALLENGES are SEPARATE but CAN BE combined if YOU CHOOSE to do so.


Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for FATE, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster.com  Use this site for syllables. I’ve used several online counters and too many have given different counts for the same word, so I use the dictionary now. Also, in some parts of the English speaking world, the syllables may come out in the spoken language a bitt differently. And that’s okay. Write to enjoy, too learn, and yes, try to get the syllables right, but above all create and enjoy.

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc with a choice of a break between line 4 and 5, then being abba accddc, which I use in my example below.


Example, if I say in the subject line of the post:

“…(FALL) This week it’s the B rhyme line.”

my Décima might be…

NO!

As the end wept upon the land,

we could hear the approaching fall.

Justice answered the trumpet’s call,

trusting the fight to her troop’s hand.

 

Fate trembles with haste to expand,

through misdeeds by her shameless foe.

Past foolish decisions now crow,

“Wait—no—this was not meant to be.”

They beg the nation, “Hear our plea.

Heal honor, shout, no…no… NO!”

 

Notice the example prompt word ‘FALL’ is in line 2, the first B line, and its rhyme in is in line 3, matching the rhyming pattern of abba accddc.


For today’s challenge, the word FATE must be one of the B line words. Then the other B line(s) word(s) must rhyme with FATE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image


 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Fuel – a 10×10 Poem.

The mind is a vast starved beast of a thing,

it takes all you give, like leaves in the spring.

 

The means to stir one to move like the wind,

is the means it takes to make the same bend.

 

To feed the soul or to feed the gut’s fire,

start with one thing, to push you to the wire.

 

When the three piers are good, glad, and well fed,

there’s not one thing they can’t do when well led.

 

Keep in tune and you will not fail to win,

lest be your foe man, or be your foe sin.

 

I’ve had the idea for this style for a while, haven’t been able to find it out there anywhere so far. I call it the 10×10, meaning 10 lines with 10 one-syllable words each. You see the structure above if you’d like to try it.

But, I haven’t had the time. So, when I saw today that MMA Storytime, our resident all things macho, (at least in my mind) had his 100 Word Flash Fiction Challenge, (Out on Tuesday, see the challenge list at top of this blog.) I thought…oh why not give it a shot. This week’s word is DIET. You don’t have to use the word, just be inspired by it.

MMA Storytime’s 100 Word Flash Fiction Challenge Badge Image.


 

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© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 27 (BLISS) This week, it’s the A rhyme line.

I chose the word BLISS this week.

You may, if you wish, make some kind of link between the Haiku Challenge prompt of (DRIP & DROP). and BLISS.

The 2 CHALLENGES are SEPARATE but CAN BE combined if YOU CHOOSE to do so.


Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for BLISS, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
Merriam-Webster.com  Use this site for syllables. I’ve used several online counters and too many have given different counts for the same word, so I use the dictionary now. Also, in some parts of the English speaking world, the syllables may come out in the spoken language a bitt differently. And that’s okay. Write to enjoy, too learn, and yes, try to get the syllables right, but above all create and enjoy.

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc with a choice of a break between line 4 and 5, then being abba accddc, which I use in my example below.


Example, if I say in the subject line of the post:

“…(FALL) This week it’s the B rhyme line.”

my Décima might be…

NO!

As the end wept upon the land,

we could hear the approaching fall.

Justice answered the trumpet’s call,

trusting the fight to her troop’s hand.

 

Fate trembles with haste to expand,

through misdeeds by her shameless foe.

Past foolish decisions now crow,

“Wait—no—this was not meant to be.”

They beg the nation, “Hear our plea.

Heal honor, shout, no…no… NO!”

 

Notice the example prompt word ‘FALL’ is in line 2, the first B line, and its rhyme in is in line 3, matching the rhyming pattern of abba accddc.


For today’s challenge, the word BLISS must be one of the A line words. Then the other A line(s) word(s) must rhyme with BLISS.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 26 (SWING) This week, it’s the A rhyme line.

I chose the word SWING this week.

You may, if you wish, make some kind of link between the Haiku Challenge prompt of (SCORCH & SHADOW). and SWING.

The 2 CHALLENGES are SEPARATE but CAN BE combined if YOU CHOOSE to do so.

As you may know, if you write a haiku you could:

  • Take your haiku and carry its theme into your Décima poem. This does not mean add the Haiku to your Décima unless you just want to. But/and you could add the link to your Haiku into your Décima post somewhere.

  • It can either support the haiku, enhance it through the opportunity of more lines, or completely turn the theme on its head and write an argument against the haiku message, which is kind of what a Décima is for, writing a counter to another Décima.

  • If you wrote a true nature haiku, you could flip its message into one about humans and the man-made world around us, such as politics, society, and even love. Yes, love is a man-made thing. At least among the humans. I suppose it could be a penguin-made thing among the penguins.

  • You may also if you like, try to use the Haiku Challenge words in your Décima somewhere. In fact, we have a lady that’s pretty consistent in doing that. And does so with such ease, you don’t even realize she’s done it unless you know she does it and look for it.


Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for STILL, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc with a choice of a break between line 4 and 5, then being abba accddc, which I use in my example below.


Example, if I say in the subject line of the post:

“…(FALL) This week it’s the B rhyme line.”

my Décima might be…

NO!

As the end wept upon the land,

we could hear the approaching fall.

Justice answered the trumpet’s call,

trusting the fight to her troop’s hand.

 

Fate trembles with haste to expand,

through misdeeds by her shameless foe.

Past foolish decisions now crow,

“Wait—no—this was not meant to be.”

They beg the nation, “Hear our plea.

Heal honor, shout, no…no… NO!”

 

Notice the example prompt word ‘FALL’ is in line 2, the first B line, and its rhyme in is in line 3, matching the rhyming pattern of abba accddc.


For today’s challenge, the word SWING must be one of the A line words. Then the other A line(s) word(s) must rhyme with SWING.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 25 (STILL) This week, it’s the D rhyme line.

I chose the word STILL this week to help those who might want to combine it with their haiku for Monday’s Haiku Challenge prompt of (CALM & STORM).

The 2 CHALLENGES are SEPARATE but CAN BE combined if YOU CHOOSE to do so.

As you may know, if you did write a haiku you can:

  • Take your haiku and carry its theme into your Décima poem.

  • It can either support the haiku, enhance it through the opportunity of more lines, or completely turn the theme on its head and write an argument against the haiku message, which is kind of what a Décima is for, writing a counter to another Décima.

  • If you wrote a true nature haiku, you could flip its message into one about humans and the man-made world around us, such as politics, society, and even love. Yes, love is a man-made thing. At least among the humans. I suppose it could be a penguin-made thing among the penguins.

  • You may also if you like, try to use the Haiku Challenge words in your Décima somewhere. In fact, we have a lady that’s pretty consistent in doing that. And does so with such ease, you don’t even realize she’s done it unless you know she does it and look for it.


Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for LOOK, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc with a choice of a break between line 4 and 5, then being abba accddc, which I use in my example below.


Example, if I say in the subject line of the post:

“…(FALL) This week it’s the B rhyme line.”

my Décima might be…

NO!

As the end wept upon the land,

we could hear the approaching fall.

Justice answered the trumpet’s call,

trusting the fight to her troop’s hand.

 

Fate trembles with haste to expand,

through misdeeds by her shameless foe.

Past foolish decisions now crow,

“Wait—no—this was not meant to be.”

They beg the nation, “Hear our plea.

Heal honor, shout, no…no… NO!”

 

Notice the example prompt word ‘FALL’ is in line 2, the first B line, and its rhyme in is in line 3, matching the rhyming pattern of abba accddc.


For today’s challenge, the word STILL must be one of the D line words. Then the other D line(s) word(s) must rhyme with STILL.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 24 (LOOK) This week, it’s the C rhyme line.

I chose the word LOOK this week to help those who might want to combine it with their haiku for Monday’s Haiku Challenge prompt of (FURY & SLOW).

The 2 CHALLENGES are SEPARATE but CAN BE combined if YOU CHOOSE to do so.

As you may know, if you did write a haiku you can:

  • Take your haiku and carry its theme into your Décima poem.

  • It can either support the haiku, enhance it through the opportunity of more lines, or completely turn the theme on its head and write an argument against the haiku message, which is kind of what a Décima is for.

  • If you wrote a true nature haiku, you could flip its message into one about humans and the man-made world around us, such as politics, society, and even love. Yes, love is a man-made thing. At least among the humans. I suppose it could be a penguin-made thing among the penguins.

  • My haiku had a little bit of intensity in it due to the sadness of this past Friday and the passing of a true legend and a hero to many.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompt words (FURY & SLOW this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for FALL, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc with a choice of a break between line 4 and 5, then being abba accddc, which I use in my example below.


Example, if I say in the subject line of the post:

“…(FALL) This week it’s the B rhyme line.”

my Décima might be…

NO!

As the end wept upon the land,

we could hear the approaching fall.

Justice answered the trumpet’s call,

trusting the fight to her troop’s hand.

 

Fate trembles with haste to expand,

through misdeeds by her shameless foe.

Past foolish decisions now crow,

“Wait—no—this was not meant to be.”

They beg the nation, “Hear our plea.

Heal honor, shout, no…no… NO!”

 

Notice the example prompt word ‘FALL’ is in line 2, the first B line, and its rhyme in is in line 3, matching the rhyming pattern of abba accddc.


For today’s challenge, the word LOOK must be one of the C line words. Then the other C line(s) word(s) must rhyme with LOOK.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 23 (FALL) This week, it’s the B rhyme line.

This week’s prompt works perfectly with the Haiku Challenge prompt of (CLIP & WINGS), so you could do a haiku with those words for one post and continue your poetry message/story with the Décima prompt of FALL.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (CLIP & WINGS this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for FALL, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word FALL must be one of the B line words. Then the other B line(s) word(s) must rhyme with FALL.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 22 (BLEND) This week, it’s the A rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (Cup & Sip this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for BLEND, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word BLEND must be one of the A line words. Then the other A line(s) word(s) must rhyme with BLEND .

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 21 (TIP) This week, it’s the D rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (Morrow & Surge this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for SMILE, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word TIP must be one of the D line words. Then the other D line(s) word(s) must rhyme with TIP.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 20 (SMILE) This week, it’s the C rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (Day & Flaw this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for SMILE, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduled Décima Poetry Challenge what to and what not to do.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word SMILE must be one of the C line words. Then the other C line(s) word(s) must rhyme with SMILE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 19 (RIDE) This week, it’s the B rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (Trip & Whip this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for STAY, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our scheduleD Décima Poetry Challenge how to and what not.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word RIDE must be one of the B line words. Then the other B line(s) word(s) must rhyme with RIDE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 18 (STAY) This week, it’s the A rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on How to Write an Espinela or Décima Poem.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (Meet and Part this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for PRIZE, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word STAYmust be one of the A line words. Then the other A line(s) word(s) must rhyme with STAY.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 17 (PRIZE) This week, it’s the D rhyme line.

That’s right everybody. I went there. I gave you the D rhyme… and with this word of all the words in the world. Don’t hate me because you’ve been challenged. Hate me because I’m beautifully insignificant.

But I really chose the word because it went well with the theme of the challenges this week. You can do a part two of your haiku if you did one, and if you want to go in that direction.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge prompts (Eye and Light this week) that often share a central theme with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  • To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for GROW, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the A rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word PRIZE must be one of the D line words. Then the other D line(s) word(s) must rhyme with PRIZE.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Ronovan Writes Décima Poetry Challenge Prompt No. 16 (GROW) This week, it’s the C rhyme line.

Welcome to the Décima Poetry Challenge. Each week we’ll be attempting a Décima, also known as an Espinela, poem.

If you don’t know how to write a Décima, click HERE to go to a post on how to write one.

Or…

Keep reading and find out, with an example included.


One last thing before we jump in the creativity pool, check out my weekly Haiku Challenge that often has prompts (Destruct and Self this week) that share a central theme, at least in my head, with the Décima Poetry Challenge prompt.


  1. To read last week’s Décima Poetry written for the prompt for KIND, click HERE for all the links in one post.

Back to our schedule Décima Poetry Challenge how to and whatnot.

If you can’t come up with a Décima using the given prompt, you can use a Synonym instead. I don’t want to stall your creativity, and with the possibility of a synonym, you will certainly write something amazing…or in my case, something that rhymes.

Sites to help:

RhymeZone.com
Thesaurus.com
HowManySyllables.com

Here is the quick description of a Décima:

There are 10 lines of poetry that rhyme. 8 syllables.
There is a set rhyming pattern we must stick to. abbaaccddc

The prompt word given (in the post heading) must appear at the end of one of the given rhyme lines, either A, B, C, or D.

Let’s look at the rhyme pattern once again and you will see what I mean.

The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc.


For example, if I say, “(NAME) This week it’s the C rhyme line” in the post heading, my Décima might be:

You took time, with a deadeye aim,
because you saw me scratch an itch,
this wound to my head needs a stitch.
Feel so bad, don’t know my own name.
Not hiding, because there’s no shame.
Get ready for when I get healed,
for your ending will be revealed.
It’s too late when you hear the crack.
That’s when it’s time for some payback.
Then I’ll be carried far afield.

Notice the example prompt word ‘name’ is in the fourth line A spot, and its rhymes are in lines one and five, matching the rhyming pattern of abbaaccddc.


For today’s challenge, the word GROW must be one of the C line words. Then the other C line(s) word(s) must rhyme with GROW.

Sometimes you break the rhyme into two stanzas using the following rhyme pattern. abba/accddc.

Once you complete your poem and post it on your blog, copy the link and place it in the comments in this post. That way other people can visit your post and check out your poem. You can also put the link of this challenge in your post to let your followers know where to go if they want to participate. This is called a Pingback. This is not mandatory to join in or to put your post link in the comments. Click HERE to find out how to do a Pingback.

Reblogging is great as well.

Some people like to copy and paste the challenge image into their posts. That’s okay with me.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

 

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.