RonovanWrites #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge #223 Rise&Fall

Remember to come back and visit the comments section during the week for your fellow poets entries!

Haiku Poetry Prompt Writing Challenge Useful Links.
Thesaurus: Rise, Fall.
HowManySyllables.com
Thesaurus.com

 

Ronovan Writes Haiku Challenge Image 2016

The Guidelines are simple.

  1. Take the two words and write a Haiku. I use Haiku in English as my style, which is 5 syllables for the first line, 7 for the second, and 5 for the third, but you can use what you like. The link above has links within it to articles about how to write Haibun, Tanka, and even a new form I created called Freku. You can also do the 3/5/3 form if you like instead of the 5/7/5 that I usually use. Write, share, and have fun. For syllable help visit HowManySyllables.com. (You would be surprised at how many syllables some words actually have.)
  2. The two words can be used as you like. Words have different definitions and you can use the definitions you like. You can even use a synonym word as long as it does not change the meaning. Go to Thesaurus.com for Synonym help.
  3. Use the Tag of Ronovan Writes Haiku Challenge. This will help me find you in case you forget to ping back or leave your URL in the comments.
  4. Copy the link of your finished haiku URL  in a comment so we can all go and visit your site to see what you have done. You can do a ping back. What’s a ping back? Put the URL link in the address bar of this post, if you like, within your post. Your inclusion of the link encourages others to try the challenges out, be creative, and join a community to find friends and more followers (hopefully). I honestly gain nothing by more people visiting the post. I don’t have ads running I get paid for by your visit. Click HERE for a detailed article on Ping Backs.
  5. You may copy one of the badges/images appearing in this post below or above and place it on your site if you wish, most normally use it within their post. I am not saying you need to, but if you would like to do so then go ahead. It is simply my way of saying thank you for participating. I sometimes make custom images for the week, if time and health permits.
  6. The Challenge currently BEGINS at 8 AM EST (New York City time) on Mondays. And a DEADLINE is Noon EST (New York City time) on the Sunday following the Challenge Post release.


The Challenge Words!

Rise&Fall

Not sure how to write a Haiku? Click HERE for a quick How to write Haiku Poem in English Form with links to articles for other forms of Haiku.

Much Respect-Much Love

Ronovan


 


 

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NEW FORM of Haiku & Poetry.

What do you get when you combine Free Verse Poetry with Haiku? A new form of poetry I call Freku. I’ve looked around and haven’t found this concept anywhere, but there is always that possibility of it being an old idea.

Instructions:

  • Write a poem with stanzas four lines each.
  • The first two stanzas should rhyme.
  • The next two stanzas should rhyme.
  • Continue in this manner for each stanza until completed with poem.
  • Close with a Haiku of 5/7/5 or 3/5/3 syllable structure that is basically the prose piece in three lines.

By taking a standard poem (And I do mean a normal poem, regardless of my example I did.) and then attempting to sum that poem up in the three lines of a Haiku, you have quite a challenge. It is almost like developing a proverb of the poem.

I attempted my first one for a post this past Monday titled Gasps for Breath. Originally the beginning poem was a standard rhyming free verse piece. Then I decided to challenge myself and cut each line down to form Haiku like stanzas. (I only include this to explain MY FREKU, not what you would do if you wanted to try it.)

5 Syllables
7 Syllables
5 Syllables
7 Syllables

5 Syllables
7 Syllables
5 Syllables
7 Syllables

5 Syllables
7 Syllables
5 Syllables
7 Syllables
7 Syllables
7 Syllables

Then the Haiku.
5 Syllables
7 Syllables
5 Syllables

Every two lines rhyme. That is how I did it. Call it my daily awareness of entries into the Fiction Challenge where I look for those pesky adverbs and dialogue tags, or my glutton for punishment, but I enjoyed cutting out the fat of the poem I created, maintaining rhymes, and maybe ending with a better poem.

After I created the idea of the poem and haiku combination, I went looking for other possible similar creations. I found the Chōka, a form Japaense poetry, or Waka. Waka means Japanese poem.

The Chōka is, or was, a narrative Waka in the 5-7-5-7-5-7-5-7-7 form during the Nara period. Think of this as an extended Tanka (5-7-5-7-7). The Chōka died out as a poetic form by the 10th Century (the beginning of the Heian period), and was replaced by the Tanka.

My inaugural piece, Gasps for Breath, was created initially as a free form poem with no aim at anything but expression. Somewhere along the way I decided to sum it up in a Haiku using the challenge words from my weekly haiku challenge. That led me to the creation of the Freku. It took longer to develop the name than the actual poem piece. I chose several names but all were taken for either poetry forms or some very inappropriate things. I’m still not completely happy with the name but it does give some clue to what type of poetry it is.

It has been pointed out to me that this is similar to a Haibun, which combines prose in the various forms with a closing/summary Haiku. For my purpose of this exercise I intend to stick to poetry without any forms of prose outside of poetry.

The Freku is not  a new challenge prompt idea. Some have linked to it with their own versions, and that is somewhat humbling to think people liked the idea that much. If you want to do a Freku and share it, you can always link it to the Weekly Haiku Challenge, and I’ll include the link in the review. It doesn’t have to relate to the challenge prompts. It would be the least I could do for anyone taking something I came up with and trying it out.

Freku, a new form of poetry.



 

Ronovan Hester is an author, with his debut historical adventure novel Amber Wake: Gabriel Falling due out in December of 2015. He shares his life as an amnesiac and Chronic Pain sufferer through his blog RonovanWrites.WordPress.com. His love of poetry, authors and community through his online world has led to a growing Weekly Haiku Challenge, Weekly Fiction Prompt Challenge, and the creation of a site dedicated to book reviews, interviews and author resources known as LitWorldInterviews.com.

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The Haiku Challenge Explained 2: Types of Haiku and How.

Today I continue to my series on explaining the weekly Haiku challenge that’s been here on Ronovan Writes for just over a year now. The challenge is more than just poetry, it’s community as well. Friends have been made, very good friends.

To make it easy for people to join in and make these great friends I wanted to make writing Haiku easy. I’ve written “How To” articles before but let’s see if it can be even simpler.

There are three styles of Haiku I have mentioned here on Ronovan Writes, all three include the Haiku in English form of three lines. The first line is 5 syllables long, the second is 7, and the third is again 5.

Traditionally one would have the second line of 7 syllables be such as to complete a sentence with the first line, and begin a sentence with the second.

Waves lap at my feet

As my thoughts drift towards you,

Peace comes with your love.

The first sentence formed with the second line of 7 syllables as the end would be, “Waves lat at my feet as my thoughts drift towards you.”

The second line of 7 syllables then continues on to begin the second completed sentence, “As my thoughts drift towards you, peace come with your love.”

Now you know how to write a Haiku. Often times, and in traditional ways the Haiku is about nature and the two sentences would contrast each other or oppose each other. For poetic sake this these rules are often broken. The purpose of the Haiku is to relay a thought, a feeling, an emotion that one might otherwise write in a full letter perhaps.

The Haibun is an a relatively newer form of, or use of, Haiku that many of our members of the Haiku Challenge like to use. And no, you don’t even have to change how you write the Haiku. All you do is write a story of perhaps a memory and then at the end you reduce that down to the very bare, basic emotions, and meaning in the form of a Haiku. These are often my favorites.

The Tanka is an old Haiku form consisting of 5 lines of poetry. The syllable structure is 5 syllables, then 7, 5, and then 7, and 7. The Tanka is something I think I want to participate in more. The subject and manner of a Tanka involves first an object in the first three lines. Think of it as if you are describing the object. Then by using the third line as the link you create the emotional response the object gives you.

Waves lap at my feet

Driving forever onward

With intensity

I long for them to carry me

Finally into your arms.

By doing the basic Haiku, which is what most of our poets do, and by reading the previous article, The Haiku Challenge Explained: Ping Backs, Sharing, Comments. you are now ready to participate. There are more articles to come, but these two are the only ones you really need to get started. Don’t let the title of the previous article concern anyone. There is a link to an article that explains what a ping back is in detail, and they are not even necessary to participate.

Links you may need in writing a Haiku:

Thesaurus.com for synonyms of my challenge prompt words. I enjoy seeing how people use the words for their own purposes.

HowManySyllables.com for making certain you have the right number of syllables for a word. I’ve been wrong a few times, thus whenever I am not 100% positive, I check and if the word I have is too many or too few syllables, I then go to Thesaurus.com to find an alternative.

Much Love, Success, and Respect

Ronovan

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Waves to your Love. (Haiku, Tanka, Poetry)

haiku image warhol style color moonlight on waves for a Haiku poem

Waves lap at my feet

Driving forever onward

With intensity

I long for them to carry me

Finally into your arms.

 

Much Love, Success, and Respect

Ronovan

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Haiku, Tanka, and Haibun. It’s all poetry to me. Learn the difference.

Some of you may have run across two strange words while reading the Haiku offerings in the Haiku Challenge each week.

Those words are Tanka and Haibun. Both look a lot like Haiku. There is a reason for that.

Starting with Haibun.

Haibun is a Haiku but is more prose related than poetry related. A great deal of what many of you write is a Haibun as opposed to a Haiku.

What you do is write the prose part and then write a Haiku related to it. A lot of you do that and I love it. The content can be autobiographical, non-fiction, or fictional. Write your prose in a paragraph or two, and often with a little more flare than a normal paragraph, if you choose to do it that way, or simply write a couple of paragraphs the normal way. Then follow that with your Haiku that sums up what you said in a Haiku of the 5/7/5 syllable structure but is more one long sentence made up of the three lines instead of the usually Haiku in English of two sentences made up using the second line as a common part of each sentence.

You will be at ease
Once trying this new method
Of writing your life.

That’s a Haibun type Haiku. I wrote a paragraph about something, and then the Haiku summed it up.

Normally in Haiku in English it would be something like,

You will be at ease
Once you try this new method,
Write your life with ease.
 
Here you have that second line being the end of a sentence.
You will be at easy once you try this new method.

And then it is the beginning of a second sentence.
Once you try this new method write your life with ease.

 
Now let’s look at Tanka, also at times may be called a Waka.

This one is pretty simple as well.
You have the syllable structure of 5/7/5/7/7.
 
You have the upper phrase of the 5/7/5.
And you have the lower phrase of the 7/7.
 
The upper phrase would be your traditional Haiku in English style. The lower phrase then is connected by that third line.
 
I learned of some new
Styles of poetry today,
Made up of many
I could spend all of my days
Writing each poetry style.
 
You can see how line three connects with the lower phrase. (Bold above is only for this article, not to be included in actual Tanka.)
Made up of many, I could spend all of my days writing each poetry style.

I know my examples here aren’t the greatest, but I simply wanted to give you the idea of what the styles are like. If you are doing the Haiku Challenge, it’s fine to try the Haibun and Tanka out during the Challenge. Stretch your creativity and expand your experience.
 
Much Respect
Ronovan

© Copyright-All rights reserved by ronovanwrites.wordpress.com 2015