Long Gone – A poem.

Long Gone

I loved those days, him in his swing,

and those when he giggled to swim.

Hopes to play in the big boy gym,

or watch Pooh and Pig’et and sing.

 

Now I see him sinking, drowning,

‘neath pressure not meant his to be.

I reach out to lift the weight free,

receiving rebukes for my care.

Being told it’s not my affair,

just a father in name only.

 

My entry for this week’s Décima Poetry Challenge No. 26 SWING.

© 2020- Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Mad Mad…what was I talking about again? A poem.

Today, Tuesday, October 6th, is Mad Hatter Day, so get your imbecilic nonsense on. I know I did.

Mad Mad…what was I talking about again?

I’m neither here nor there but yonder
smudging the windows of your pains.
Did you know I’ve been seen in seines,
while you stink of Salamander?

Have I seen a girl, much blonder,
than that tailored swift one just there?
Such a question is plain not fair,
I’ll be the hook of her next trill.
But she’ll not catch me standing still
for I’ll pull out my Joyn Mayair.

What was I talking about again poetry image Mad Hatter.

 

You might have a bit of fun figuring out some of the words and how they’re used in the story of the poem. Some happened by accident when I read back through. And with a little word change here and there, it jelled. I even ventured into the Lord of the Rings stories, but fortunately thought better.

My entry for this week’s Décima Poetry Challenge No. 25 STILL.

© 2020- Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Love in the Air.

Love in the Air

On soft breeze a divine bouquet
her invitation is discrete,
to imbibe in her gifts so sweet,
and my heart with joy must obey.
Eternal beasts come into play.

Distance is an icy lover,
these shivers I cannot cover.
Time will tell the battles end.
I’ll travel along that soft wind,
to love to rediscover.

How to write an Espinela or Décima poem.

How to write an Espinela/Décima poem.

The Traditional Décima Poem

Décima poetry is a 10 line stanza with 8 syllables per line. The rhyming pattern is abbaaccddc. Using the 10 lines there are generally two ways to organize: The 10 lines, or breaking the 10 lines into two stanzas using abba/accddc.

The abba/accddc requires either a period or semicolon after the fourth line break.

Also, there can only be pauses after even verses, particularly after the fourth. Edit-09/04/2020

Topics are as varied as your imagination.  With the Décima the subject matter tends to be more socially conscience than some poems. Philosophical, political, dogma, and religious ideas are among the topics.  Although, it can also be in the form of satire, criticism, and insulting to an enemy/opponent in a situation.

Just imagine if the candidates for a public office decided to write Décima challenges. First, one candidate would write a 10 line stanza and have a decimista/decimero read it aloud at the opponents next TV appearance. The opponent then responds with another 10 line stanza and a decimista/decimero would return the favor. This would go on for ever how long it will, and sometimes ends up as a song of challenge.

Back in the day, the poems were written anonymously, thus the reason for a decimero. I imagine it was always known who the writer was, at least in matters of romance…maybe.

The reason this form of poetry is also called Espinela is because of Vicente Espinel who was a Spanish writer, musician, soldier, prisoner of pirates, and finally a priest. He is sometimes noted as the founder of the décima or the one to popularize it once again.

Tools I use in my Haiku Challenges each week will definitely be even more useful here. There are the following three RhymeZone.com, Thesaurus.com, and finally HowManySyllables.com. Look for the new Espinela Poetry Challenge beginning 4/17/2020.

An example of an abba/accddc décima:

On soft breeze a divine bouquet
her invitation is discrete,
to imbibe in her gifts so sweet,
and my heart with joy must obey.

Eternal beasts come into play.
Distance is an icy lover,
these shivers I cannot cover.
Time will tell the battles end.
I’ll travel along that soft wind,
to love to rediscover.

If you like, there is a Décima Challenge here each Wednesday.

Here is the quick and perhaps easier description of a Décima Poem:

I’ve had a much-valued part of my poetry family let me know that my description might not be clear enough, so I’ve come up with this. There are 10 lines (stanza) of poetry, but unlike other poetry that rhymes there is a strict set rhyming pattern, we must stick to.
In addition, each line must only have 8 syllables.
The rhyme pattern is;
a
b
b
a
a
c
c
d
d
c

But remember, if you want to be a slight bit different, you can do the four lines of abba, then the six lines of accddc.

Décima as Song

Songs have been created for years using Décima poetry. Using the abba/accddc two stanza method and repeat until you have your song. There will be a more complete post about this another time, just know Décima plays a large part in the Latin American culture.

In Ecuador, they do a forty-four line Décima with a four-line opening, no set pattern of rhyme and each of the four lines from the opening stanza goes on to appear later in the song, although perhaps a bit modified.

“The [Décima] is one of the most deeply-rooted and widely distributed strophic forms throughout Latin America, being especially significant in popular and rural poetry. An example of this is the current survival of practices such as payas, where it is often used that two or more singers face each other in a duel of improvised [Décima] at the time, with musical accompaniment, generally the guitar.” from Wikipedia and translated using google translate. Payas: to improvise a song.

© 2020 Ronovan Hester Copyright reserved. The author asserts his moral and legal rights over this work.

Indulge to Bulge. A poem in the Décima or Espinela style.

A new Poetry Challenge is coming and here is another of my examples. The How To follows.

Indulge to Bulge

Blissful longing of butter fat,
Floating above the sea of blame
Renders worthy of the blue flame.
What’s now a spare tire, once was flat.

Crying for more from the spoiled brat,
Brings forth the lazy quelling hands.
Then blames the obese on lax glands.
Fail to heed the words of the wise
Leads to chaffed thighs or heart that dies.
Toss the flans, cans, and frying pans.

 

 

10 lines with each having 8 syllables.

Sometimes people divide the lines into two stanzas of four and six. A pause after the fourth which means a period or semicolon is warranted. Some divide in other ways depending on where they learned Espinela, but all are 10 lines and…

…8 syllables to each line with

a rhyming pattern of abba/accddc

Traditional themes of old have been philosophical, religious, lyrical, political, and satirical humor. But you can do whatever you like as the theme can be anything, but I may be setting themes or a couple of words as part of the challenge.

This form of poetry is known as an Espinela or décima poem of octameter (more or less eight syllables). The form is named after Vicente Gómez Martínez-Espinel (baptized December 28, 1550, Ronda, Málaga, Spain—died February 4, 1624, Madrid) an expelled university student who entered the army, was a rogue, and eventually was ordained into the priesthood. He was a contemporary of Cervantes., who is probably most known for writing Don Quixote. Espinel is alternately credited with creating the style or reviving it. Whichever it is, we have it today.

Again, the rhyming pattern is always

A
B
B
A
A
C
C
D
D
C

There are even songs created of multiple Espinela Poems united.

In Spain these poems were often sung or spoken, with the topics being philosophical, religious, lyrical, political, and even humorous with the humor being satire in nature noting the weakness or foolish act of the recipient. Often a challenge would be made by the decimero, the person who read aloud the anonymously written poem, to the recipient who is to respond in turn. This would start a duel of poetry, and possibly creating an interesting song of responses and challenges.

It is up to you as to how you structure your Espinela, as there really is no set in stone structure, only the syllables and rhyming pattern.

Childish Heart. A poem in the Décima or Espinela style.

A new Poetry Challenge is coming and here is my example. The How To follows.

Childish Heart

It’s a beautiful world we’re on.
To choose a path of divisions.
Our most foolish decisions.
All chances for atonement blown?

Child-like laughs, in mischievous tone,
Remind me of more hopeful days.
Dreams possible through class essays.
Believing not in might but can.
Not knowing us and them but man.
Now’s time to turn to younger ways?

 

10 lines with each having 8 syllables.

Sometimes people divide the lines into two stanzas of four and six. A pause after the fourth which means a period or semicolon is warranted. Some divide in other ways depending on where they learned Espinela, but all are 10 lines and…

…8 syllables to each line with

a rhyming pattern of abba/accddc

Traditional themes of old have been philosophical, religious, lyrical, political, and satirical humor. But you can do whatever you like as the theme can be anything, but I may be setting themes or a couple of words as part of the challenge.

This form of poetry is known as an Espinela or décima poem of octameter (more or less eight syllables). The form is named after Vicente Gómez Martínez-Espinel (baptized December 28, 1550, Ronda, Málaga, Spain—died February 4, 1624, Madrid) an expelled university student who entered the army, was a rogue, and eventually was ordained into the priesthood. He was a contemporary of Cervantes., who is probably most known for writing Don Quixote. Espinel is alternately credited with creating the style or reviving it. Whichever it is, we have it today.

Again, the rhyming pattern is always

A
B
B
A
A
C
C
D
D
C

There are even songs created of multiple Espinela Poems united.

In Spain these poems were often sung or spoken, with the topics being philosophical, religious, lyrical, political, and even humorous with the humor being satire in nature noting the weakness or foolish act of the recipient. Often a challenge would be made by the decimero, the person who read aloud the anonymously written poem, to the recipient who is to respond in turn. This would start a duel of poetry, and possibly creating an interesting song of responses and challenges.

It is up to you as to how you structure your Espinela, as there really is no set in stone structure, only the syllables and rhyming pattern.