Top 10 Greatest Muppet Guest Stars!

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Question Marks and Too Many Tears?

?

No, that’s not a question I am asking. That’s the legal name of the lead singer of a 1960s Mexican-American garage band that some call the first punk rock group.

The groups original members were born in Texas of immigrants from Mexico and eventually moved to Saginaw, Michigan. Yes, from one border to the other. Hot to cold. The parents followed the employment trail and what better place than just north of Detroit, auto industry USA.

Question and the Mysterians 1960s photo

Why ? and the Mysterians, also written as Question Mark and the Mysterians and Q and the Mysterians? They needed a name and Mysterians came from the Japanese science-fiction film “The Mysterians.”

The Mysterians movie poster

The song 96 Tears was their number one hit in 1966. It was originally called Too Many Tears, then 69 Tears, but the group thought better considering the time and went with the 96 Tears, which I think sounds smoother with the s sound at the end of 96 and Tears complimenting each other.

Oh, and did I mention ? says he’s from Mars and walked with the dinosaurs?

 

Too many teardrops for one heart to be crying
Too many teardrops for one heart to carry on

You’re way on top now since you left me
You’re always laughing way down at me
But watch out now, I’m gonna get there
We’ll be together for just a little while
And then I’m gonna put you way down here
And you’ll start crying ninety-six tears
Cry, cry

And when the sun comes up, I’ll be on top
You’ll be right down there, looking up
And I might wave, come up here
But I don’t see you waving now
I’m way down here, wondering how
I’m gonna get you but I know now
I’ll just cry, cry, I’ll just cry

Too many teardrops for one heart to be crying
Too many teardrops for one heart to carry on

You’re gonna cry ninety-six tears
You’re gonna cry ninety-six tears
You’re gonna cry, cry, cry, cry now
You’re gonna cry, cry, cry, cry
Ninety-six tears

Come on and let me hear you cry, now
Ninety-six tears, woo
I wanna hear you cry
Night and day, yeah, all night long

Uh, ninety-six tears, cry, cry, cry
Come on, baby, let me hear you cry now, all night long
Uh, ninety-six tears, yeah, come on now
Uh, ninety-six tears

 

Us or Them? Who polices Hate Speech?

“Nadine Strossen, the former president of the ACLU, argues that censorship does more harm than good—especially when it comes to social media platforms. In an interview filmed at the 2018 Aspen Ideas Festival in June, Strossen explains that hate speech is not a recognized legal concept in the United States. “That said,” she continues, “speech that conveys a hateful message—along with speech that conveys any message—may, in a particular context, be punished if it directly causes specific imminent, serious harm.” Strossen goes on to demarcate the difference between free speech and hate speech. Ultimately, she makes a case for leaving the conversation about hate speech to citizens rather than government entities or privately-owned social media platforms.”

The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost- A video presentation.

“Most readers consider “The Road Not Taken” to be a paean to triumphant self-assertion (“I took the one less traveled by”), but the literal meaning of the poem’s own lines seems completely at odds with this interpretation. The poem’s speaker tells us he “shall be telling,” at some point in the future, of how he took the road less traveled by, yet he has already admitted that the two paths “equally lay / In leaves” and “the passing there / Had worn them really about the same.” So the road he will later call less traveled is actually the road equally traveled. The two roads are interchangeable.

According to this reading, then, the speaker will be claiming “ages and ages hence” that his decision made “all the difference” only because this is the kind of claim we make when we want to comfort or blame ourselves by assuming that our current position is the product of our own choices (as opposed to what was chosen for us or allotted to us by chance). The poem isn’t a salute to can-do individualism; it’s a commentary on the self-deception we practice when constructing the story of our own lives. “The Road Not Taken” may be, as the critic Frank Lentricchia memorably put it, “the best example in all of American poetry of a wolf in sheep’s clothing.” But we could go further: It may be the best example in all of American culture of a wolf in sheep’s clothing.” From the article The Most Misread Poem in America by David Orr in the Paris Review.

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